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Special Tax District

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NEWS
June 6, 1995
An effort is under way to allow a second residential neighborhood in Baltimore to levy additional taxes to pay for private security and sanitation services. It's good to see people want to invest more in Baltimore to make it a more livable city, but wouldn't it make sense to wait until the first residential special benefits district can be properly evaluated before attempting to create another one?It has been just six months since a referendum approved creating a special tax district in Charles Village, South Charles Village and a small part of Waverly.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2007
There is a next year in Ocean City, at least one more season for the Maryland resort's signature business - the 117-year-old Trimper Rides. After squabbling with tax collectors since spring, members of the closely held family corporation say they will keep the attraction open in 2008. They hope to buy time for state and local officials to come up with a rescue plan that would preserve the boardwalk arcades and rides that have become synonymous with a place generations of tourists have visited.
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NEWS
August 30, 1993
Residents question town's special tax districtThe Maryland Court of Appeals has agreed to hear a lawsuit filed by Cape St. Claire residents challenging the legality of the community's special tax district.A group of nine residents has said they shouldn't be taxed foservices they don't use, such as private clubhouses not open to the general public and built with money from special benefit district funds.The county has 38 special taxing districts, which must be formed by a majority of homeowners and are created to raise money for services the county can't provide.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2003
Anne Arundel County residents who live on the Little Magothy River, a secluded waterway more popular with blue herons and beavers than with speedboats and personal watercraft, agree that they should protect the river and its inhabitants. But a proposal to tax property owners $350 a year each to pay for dredging that would keep the river from turning marshy has divided the communities of Cape St. Claire, Woods Landing and Bayhead, among others. Some opponents accuse wealthy neighbors with flashy fishing boats of forcing an excessive fee on those with modest incomes and canoes.
NEWS
October 9, 1992
A group of Columbia residents began waving around some tantalizing numbers recently. According to this group, the Community Panel on Governance, Columbia could save up to $25 million and allow its residents to write off $3 million a year in state and federal taxes if the town were incorporated or made a special tax district.The panel is recommending that the Columbia Forum, which is charged with coming up with future goals for Columbia, establish a commission to look into the merits of changing the town's status and the possible benefits that would result.
NEWS
March 2, 1993
One of the best ideas for helping Historic Ellicott City reach its full potential may have died before it ever got a chance. If so, the cause of death can be traced to one of the most dreaded words of contemporary civic discourse: Taxes.Should we be surprised?A proposal to establish a special tax district along the quaint row of shops and restaurants was unceremoniously trashed last week by merchants. They argued that such a tax would be passed along to customers, who would then shun their Main Street establishments.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
Merchants in historic Ellicott City are fighting a proposal to create a special tax district for their area that would pay for such expenses as promotions, maintenance and security.The tax is among recommendations outlined in a 46-page report by the Ellicott City Marketing Task Force. The group was formed in April by County Executive Charles I. Ecker to suggest improvements for the historic district.The report lays out a five-year plan to improve marketing and tourism, operations, growth and development in the historic district.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
A cost-saving measure mulled by the Crofton Civic Association board to have town hall employees pay for a larger share of their health insurance turns out to be impossible under state law, according to the town manager.Board member Gayle Colner Sears suggested Monday night that in reviewing compensation packages, the board should consider having employees pay for half of their health insurance, instead of the current 20 percent. The Crofton special tax district pays for 80 percent of the insurance for five of six police officers and for Barbara Swann, town manager.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | April 11, 1991
While the Crofton Civic Association prepares to commission a study looking at the pros and cons of municipal incorporation, a group representing residents living outside the special tax district are concerned about being left out of the process."
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | January 23, 1995
Property owners in the Crofton special tax district will vote tonight on a bylaw change that would require their approval for increases in the budget.The amendment, proposed by resident William J. Flynn, would give property owners a vote on any budget exceeding the previous year's. The bylaws now say the Crofton Civic Association can set spending levels without voter approval if increases do not exceed the previous budget by more than 5 percent.Mr. Flynn, who has lived in Crofton for 28 years, told the civic association in November that residents needed more say in how the special tax district collects and spends money.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
IT SEEMED like a perfect match of a desire and a willingness to accommodate it. Influential developers John Paterakis and C. William Struever wanted more security and street-sweeping for their properties at Inner Harbor East and at the old Allied Signal site and other parts of Fells Point. The Downtown Partnership, with more than a decade of experience providing such services to the central business district, was agreeable to extending its reach. And state legislators representing the city's waterfront shepherded through bills to expand the boundaries of the partnership's authority to impose a tax surcharge.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2003
Harford County representatives to the House of Delegates have placed a plan by County Executive James M. Harkins to create special taxing districts on its summer-study agenda, effectively killing the bill for this General Assembly session, officials confirmed yesterday. Del. Barry Glassman, a Republican who is delegation chairman, said yesterday that he sent a letter to Harkins late last week notifying him of the delegates' decision. "There were just so many unanswered questions," Glassman said.
NEWS
February 26, 1997
FINANCING ROAD IMPROVEMENTS, particularly those designed to attract large industrial and commercial enterprises, used to be a relatively simple task. Draw up the engineering plans, hold a public hearing and the County Council would add the project to the capital improvements budget.But with its 2-year-old tax cap, Anne Arundel County no longer has an easy route to finance major road projects with general obligation bonds.Undeveloped properties along Route 32 between the Howard County line and the National Security Agency near Fort Meade should be among the most attractive commercial and industrial properties in the county.
NEWS
February 18, 1997
GIVE MICHAEL PACE credit. The Anne Arundel County school board member's idea of creating special taxation districts to generate more money for education suffers from some fundamental flaws, but he raises an interesting question: How long can Anne Arundel, given its existing tax cap, maintain the quality of its school system and provide other essential services?Mr. Pace's intent is noble. He wants to develop a palatable method of raising more money for education. In his plan, the county would be broken into smaller units, such as councilmanic districts.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | February 14, 1997
Crofton-style special tax districts could be used to boost school spending under a controversial plan being offered by former Anne Arundel County school board President Michael A. Pace.The Edgewater lawyer is to propose to the county's House delegation this morning a plan to allow sections of the county to create districts to levy property taxes in addition to the county's taxes to raise money for neighborhood schools.Pace said his plan would provide a way around the county's tax cap. But critics say it would widen the gap in education resources between rich and poor areas, between areas where people want to funnel money to schools and where they don't.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1996
A cost-saving measure mulled by the Crofton Civic Association board to have town hall employees pay for a larger share of their health insurance turns out to be impossible under state law, according to the town manager.Board member Gayle Colner Sears suggested Monday night that in reviewing compensation packages, the board should consider having employees pay for half of their health insurance, instead of the current 20 percent. The Crofton special tax district pays for 80 percent of the insurance for five of six police officers and for Barbara Swann, town manager.
NEWS
March 5, 1992
A century and a half ago when travelers traversed present-day Pikesville, they had to pay a toll: A score of sheep could pass for 20 cents.They can't raise money for improvements in Pikesville like that any more. Instead, merchants in that northwest Baltimore County community are forming a special tax district to better coordinate their marketing, spruce up their streets and combat the malls that have wooed away much of their business.With recent approval by the County Council, Pikesville is creating a commercial district management authority.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | March 25, 1991
The Crofton Civic Association wants to know: Would the community benefit by becoming a city or town?After a daylong seminar Saturday covering a wide range of topics, members said they want Town Manager Jordan Harding to find out what it will cost for a detailed study of incorporation. But with literally hundreds of factors to consider, itwill be some time before members of the special tax district will beable to formally debate the issue.Even a committee which started meeting eight months ago couldn't reach a conclusion.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 25, 1996
1/8 TC Carroll's legislative delegation will seek an amendment to enable the county to create special tax districts to help residents in unincorporated areas pay for infrastructure improvements.The County Commissioners requested the legislation in response to a Lineboro group's concerns about failing septic systems and possible well pollution. The delegation agreed to the request, but would allow use of the tax districts only to pay for water and sewer improvements.The districts would function much like homeowners' associations.
NEWS
November 28, 1995
SPECIAL BENEFITS tax districts are nothing new for Maryland. They have been around since 1929 in Anne Arundel County, where 14 new taxing districts have been created in the past six years. But the situation there is different from Baltimore, which only has two such districts, with voters currently deciding in a mail-in referendum whether to add a third.In Anne Arundel, the best way for many waterfront communities to pay to maintain roads and piers is by placing a special tax on themselves.
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