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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | October 8, 1996
Central Special School will remain closed for a second consecutive day today because the water supply at the five-school South River complex in Edgewater has been contaminated by solvents.Meanwhile, county and school officials were to continue tests today and to flush the water system.What caused the contamination remained a mystery, and officials were looking for the source, said John A. Morris, public works spokesman.A teacher at one school noticed a kerosene-like odor from drinking fountain Thursday, prompting officials to shut off water to the complex, he said.
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NEWS
By Kate Hollander | February 25, 2014
When my daughter was diagnosed with autism four years ago, our family was determined to make sure she received the right education, one that would meet her needs and give her a chance to fulfill her potential. We never imagined how hard we would have to fight - or how much money we would spend - to give her that. Now 7 years old and in second grade at the Gateway School in Baltimore, my daughter is thriving and continues to progress academically. But her enrollment at one of the state's "nonpublic" special education schools was threatened last year.
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NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1998
About 30 Howard County teen-agers with severe behavioral problems will be transferred to a school in Baltimore County from a psychiatric hospital in Ellicott City to reduce costs, the Howard school board decided yesterday.For two years starting this fall, the students will attend Strawbridge School near Randallstown because costs at Taylor Manor have escalated in recent years, Michael E. Hickey, Howard school superintendent, said at yesterday's board meeting.Also at the meeting, the board approved an evening school for some special education students and for students who are expelled or suspended.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2013
While most children see dream jobs, spouses and freedom in their futures, Brian Bailey saw only death. The autistic boy, who stopped speaking at 18 months, grew up with anxiety about getting older, and his rocky educational track record early on didn't allay his fears. "I was obsessing from the beginning about his future, asking 'What am I going to do?' " said his mother, Jennell Bailey, as she recalled his one week in a Baltimore public school general-education classroom, where she said he wasn't flourishing.
NEWS
May 18, 1998
Woman gives prize to Edgewater schoolKatherine Gonsalves recently presented certificates for 50,000 Campbell Soup labels to Central Special School in Edgewater.A resident of Severna Park, Gonsalves won the certificates in a prize drawing conducted by Safeway Food and Drug.Gonsalves chose to award the labels to Central Special School because her granddaughter attends the school.The labels can be used by schools to earn supplies and equipment from Campbell's. The school intends to redeem the labels for videotaping equipment to assist students in recording their progress.
NEWS
June 26, 1996
Sallie Todd Harrison, 65, special education teacherSallie Todd Harrison, a longtime special education teacher in Anne Arundel County, died of cancer Saturday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Severna Park resident was 65.She taught at the Sunny Glen Special School from 1966 to 1967, the Sunny Acre Special School from 1967 to 1976 and the Central Special Education School from 1976 until 1993, when she retired.The former Sallie Todd was born in Roxboro, N.C. She received a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland College Park in 1975 and a master's degree from Bowie State College in 1982.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 1, 1996
Vision and hearing technicians from the county health department and school nurses have scheduled vision and hearing screenings in public and private schools in the county through September.The screenings are required by state law for children in preschool, kindergarten, third and eighth grades, and for students new to county schools, private schools, nursery schools and day care programs. They are designed to detect vision and hearing problems that might impair a child's ability to do well in school.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and William B. Talbott and Mark Bomster and William B. Talbott,Staff Writers GnB | April 10, 1992
A 20-year-old student and a teacher were stabbed with a steak knife today at Joseph C. Briscoe High School during a fight between two girls who had been feuding for a week, school officials said.School police arrested Michelle Newton, 18, of the 500 block of W. Preston St., and charged her with two counts of assault and stabbing and one count of possession of a deadly weapon. Injured were Renee Washington, 20, a student at the school, and Jaqueline Ridges, the teacher who intervened in the argument.
NEWS
February 26, 1992
Within hours after a security guard was shot and wounded while disarming a student at Roland Park Middle School, Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke was proposing an "alternative" school for disruptive middle schoolers. It is an excellent idea.The city has no special program for disruptive students. Those who cause problems in one school are often simply transferred to another school -- which is how the student with the gun came to be enrolled at Roland Park. While some students may benefit from a fresh start, a new environment and different peer group, often such disciplinary transfers simply move a problem from one school to another.
NEWS
May 15, 1994
Each year, some 50,000 children are suspended from Maryland public schools. Many of them are punished because they have disrupted classes. Ask any teacher or principal and he or she will tell you that just one unruly youngster can destroy the most dedicated efforts in the classroom.Some jurisdictions have alternative schools to handle troublemakers. But that often concentrates all the bad apples in one barrel. Too often, these alternative schools become warehouses in which troubled kids are dumped to bide their time.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2010
A 6-year-old special-needs student was in serious condition after he fell out of the back of a moving school bus Wednesday afternoon, city schools and Baltimore County police said Thursday. Baltimore County paramedics responded to the incident shortly after 3 p.m. Wednesday, where they found the injured boy after he fell off a bus that was taking him to his West Baltimore home from a Baltimore County special-education school. The student was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he remains in serious condition, according to Lt. Rob McCullough, spokesman for the Baltimore County Police Department.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | May 29, 2008
The Baltimore school system is contracting with an outside company to run a school for special-education students, a move that will combine two special-education schools currently operating alongside each other in the same building. Pennsylvania-based Specialized Education Services Inc. received a three-year contract, worth $4.2 million for the first year, to run the Woodbourne Day School and Central Career Academy at Briscoe. The amount the company receives in future years will depend on a funding formula for special-education services set by the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2004
At lunchtime, severely disabled students at Ruth Parker Eason School in Millersville gaze at the light-up toys and glow-in-the-dark gizmos that line the walls of Paula Gentile's darkened classroom while they are fed by stomach tubes. The colorful displays offer important stimuli to the students, many of whom have multiple physical and cognitive disabilities. "These kids tend to be so static," Gentile said. But the scenery at two of Anne Arundel County's special education centers will change under a plan that has some parents worried.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | March 13, 2003
Maryland Superintendent of Schools Nancy S. Grasmick stood before the Howard County delegation yesterday in Annapolis and announced plans to rebuild Cedar Lane school in Columbia as a state - and potentially national - model for serving severely disabled students. It was an abrupt about-face from signals her staff had been giving county educators. Until yesterday, the understood command had been to explore dismantling the much-loved and physically inadequate facility, which educates 115 extremely disabled children and young adults ages 3 to 21, and distribute its students among neighborhood schools.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
The 30 members of the concert band and string ensemble from Notre Dame Preparatory School had an appreciative audience yesterday when they performed at the Ridge Ruxton School in Baltimore County. The entire student body of Ridge Ruxton, a county school with 160 students ages 3 to 21 who have intensive special education needs, turned out for the concert in the gym. "When we invited the Notre Dame Prep band to come, we thought it would be a little different for our pupils to interact with nondisabled students," said Ed Bennett, principal at Ridge Ruxton.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 16, 2001
Supporters of several Baltimore special education schools recommended for closing in the next two years made pleas last night to keep them open, saying that disadvantaged students would be further hurt by the proposed changes. At a hearing before city education officials at Polytechnic Institute, the parents and grandparents of students, as well as teachers and other staff spoke on behalf of the schools that face closure as part of a sweeping reorganization plan announced last month. Four special education centers - Central Career Center at Briscoe, Claremont School, Upton Home and Hospital Services School, and Waverly Career Center - are on the list for closure.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1999
Even as they praised the ambitious objectives of a future alternative school for troubled students, Howard County school board members reiterated last night that money will ultimately determine the scope of the project. After a meeting last week that left board members with questions about plans for the school, a workshop was held last night to study the alternative learning center's space requirements and curriculum in greater detail. The school -- which would open in 2001 -- would be unique in Howard County, serving middle and high school students who have been disruptive or have emotional disabilities.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | December 13, 1993
The teaching of values, the conviction to follow through on dreams and visions and a firm belief in God are what made Archbishop Spalding High School worthy of national recognition this year, Bishop William C. Newman, of the Baltimore Archdiocese, said Friday.At the assembly in the auditorium, the school received its official banner from the U.S. Department of Education, which honored the school this summer by naming it a Blue Ribbon school -- the first Anne Arundel County school, public or private, to receive the honor.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
Supporters of several Baltimore special education schools recommended for closing in the next two years made pleas last night to keep them open, saying that disadvantaged students would be further hurt by the proposed changes. At a hearing before city education officials at Polytechnic Institute, the parents and grandparents of students, as well as teachers and other staff spoke on behalf of the schools that face closure as part of a sweeping reorganization plan announced last month. Four special education centers - Central Career Center at Briscoe, Claremont School, Upton Home and Hospital Services School, and Waverly Career Center - are on the list for closure.
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