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Special Master

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NEWS
July 27, 1996
JUDGE MARVIN J. Garbis of the U.S. District Court has already decided that a special master should be named as part of the settlement of the American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit over public housing in Baltimore. The judge still must choose a special master and define his responsibilities. Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson would like that role to be as limited as possible.That would be a mistake. This special master must be more than an ombudsman for complaints from suburban residents disgruntled by the movement of public housing tenants to the counties, or for housing tenants themselves.
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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
Under pressure from a federal judge who has threatened to hold them in contempt, Baltimore school officials have made "substantial strides" to bring the district's special education computer system up to good working condition, according to a new report by a court liaison. The system tracks information on the thousands of city children who receive special education services. As a result of a lawsuit filed 18 years ago, the school district is required to ensure that the system is functioning properly.
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NEWS
April 16, 1996
THE LIST OF those who believe the federal courts should appoint a special master to help carry out the public housing settlement involving Baltimore and the nearby counties is fairly long: Among them, U.S. Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros, U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, Baltimore County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and other county leaders.The only person whose opinion really counts, however, is that of U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis. He must ultimately decide whether to accept the plan that would enable some 2,000 families to move from public housing projects in Baltimore to subsidized units elsewhere in the city and suburbs.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
A retired judge recommended yesterday that the Maryland Court of Appeals uphold almost all of the governor's legislative redistricting plan, dismissing arguments that it hurts minority representation and divides such communities as Dundalk and Hampstead. But retired Court of Appeals Judge Robert L. Karwacki called for a change to the lower Eastern Shore map, saying Somerset County should be joined with Worcester and Wicomico counties to restore the district of Sen. J. Lowell Stoltzfus.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Lyle Denniston and Susan Baer and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Citing 24 incidents suggesting that independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's office improperly leaked information to reporters, a federal judge has ordered a full-scale investigation to wind up late this year -- an inquiry that could lead to a contempt-of-court citation.U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson, in a late September ruling unsealed yesterday, said that President Clinton's lawyers had produced evidence of "serious and repetitive" violations of grand jury secrecy rules.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 18, 2002
Under pressure from a federal judge who has threatened to hold them in contempt, Baltimore school officials have made "substantial strides" to bring the district's special education computer system up to good working condition, according to a new report by a court liaison. The system tracks information on the thousands of city children who receive special education services. As a result of a lawsuit filed 18 years ago, the school district is required to ensure that the system is functioning properly.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
An Anne Arundel County judge is expected to decide Dec. 17 whether Maryland's gay rights law will go to referendum in next year's election. Circuit Judge Eugene M. Lerner set the hearing date yesterday. He is presiding over a lawsuit filed by supporters of the law, who contend that petitions calling for the referendum contain invalid signatures and should be thrown out. The judge also issued an order yesterday that requires the referendum's backers to pay part of the $40,000 fee of a special master, who was hired by the court to review petition signatures.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
Supporters and opponents of Maryland's gay rights law spent yesterday poring over petitions that will determine whether the statute goes to referendum in next year's election. Their reviews were prompted by a court-appointed special master's finding that thousands of signatures on petitions calling for a referendum vote might not be valid. At issue is a law that would outlaw discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, housing and public accommodations, approved by the General Assembly this year after heavy lobbying by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | July 19, 1991
NFL players won yet another skirmish in their legal war against the owners yesterday when a special master appointed by a federal judge in Baltimore recommended that pension benefits be increased for retired players.Joseph A. LoCicero, appointed by U.S. District Judge Joseph C. Howard, recommended that benefits be increased by one-third or insurance company annuities be purchased to increase the benefits.The pension fund case is just one of six legal disputes between the owners and the players, and the players have been coming out ahead lately, prompting Doug Allen, assistant executive director of the NFL Players Association, to say that the NFLPA is "the victory-a-week club."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
A retired judge recommended yesterday that the Maryland Court of Appeals uphold almost all of the governor's legislative redistricting plan, dismissing arguments that it hurts minority representation and divides such communities as Dundalk and Hampstead. But retired Court of Appeals Judge Robert L. Karwacki called for a change to the lower Eastern Shore map, saying Somerset County should be joined with Worcester and Wicomico counties to restore the district of Sen. J. Lowell Stoltzfus.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2001
An Anne Arundel County judge is expected to decide Dec. 17 whether Maryland's gay rights law will go to referendum in next year's election. Circuit Judge Eugene M. Lerner set the hearing date yesterday. He is presiding over a lawsuit filed by supporters of the law, who contend that petitions calling for the referendum contain invalid signatures and should be thrown out. The judge also issued an order yesterday that requires the referendum's backers to pay part of the $40,000 fee of a special master, who was hired by the court to review petition signatures.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
Supporters and opponents of Maryland's gay rights law spent yesterday poring over petitions that will determine whether the statute goes to referendum in next year's election. Their reviews were prompted by a court-appointed special master's finding that thousands of signatures on petitions calling for a referendum vote might not be valid. At issue is a law that would outlaw discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, housing and public accommodations, approved by the General Assembly this year after heavy lobbying by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Lyle Denniston and Susan Baer and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Citing 24 incidents suggesting that independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's office improperly leaked information to reporters, a federal judge has ordered a full-scale investigation to wind up late this year -- an inquiry that could lead to a contempt-of-court citation.U.S. District Judge Norma Holloway Johnson, in a late September ruling unsealed yesterday, said that President Clinton's lawyers had produced evidence of "serious and repetitive" violations of grand jury secrecy rules.
NEWS
July 27, 1996
JUDGE MARVIN J. Garbis of the U.S. District Court has already decided that a special master should be named as part of the settlement of the American Civil Liberties Union lawsuit over public housing in Baltimore. The judge still must choose a special master and define his responsibilities. Baltimore Housing Commissioner Daniel P. Henson would like that role to be as limited as possible.That would be a mistake. This special master must be more than an ombudsman for complaints from suburban residents disgruntled by the movement of public housing tenants to the counties, or for housing tenants themselves.
NEWS
April 16, 1996
THE LIST OF those who believe the federal courts should appoint a special master to help carry out the public housing settlement involving Baltimore and the nearby counties is fairly long: Among them, U.S. Housing Secretary Henry G. Cisneros, U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, Baltimore County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger and other county leaders.The only person whose opinion really counts, however, is that of U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis. He must ultimately decide whether to accept the plan that would enable some 2,000 families to move from public housing projects in Baltimore to subsidized units elsewhere in the city and suburbs.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino | July 19, 1991
NFL players won yet another skirmish in their legal war against the owners yesterday when a special master appointed by a federal judge in Baltimore recommended that pension benefits be increased for retired players.Joseph A. LoCicero, appointed by U.S. District Judge Joseph C. Howard, recommended that benefits be increased by one-third or insurance company annuities be purchased to increase the benefits.The pension fund case is just one of six legal disputes between the owners and the players, and the players have been coming out ahead lately, prompting Doug Allen, assistant executive director of the NFL Players Association, to say that the NFLPA is "the victory-a-week club."
NEWS
By SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 11, 2000
WASHINGTON -- In a move that could add two years to the time it takes to decide a dispute between Maryland and Virginia over the Potomac River, the Supreme Court chose a Maine lawyer yesterday to gather facts and suggest how to rule. The court appointed Ralph I. Lancaster Jr. of Portland as a "special master" to gather evidence about Virginia's desire to build a pipe to take drinking water from the Potomac. Lancaster's selection was an alternative to the court's moving to decide the case on its own. Special masters are often used by the court in boundary disputes between states.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2004
Stephen B. Burbank, the man who will decide this weekend whether Terrell Owens plays the 2004 football season in Philadelphia or Baltimore, admits it: He likes the Eagles. Stand down, Ravens fans. The Eagles that Burbank enjoys feature musicians Glenn Frey and Don Henley, not quarterback Donovan McNabb and coach Andy Reid. "I grew up in the '60s," Burbank said. "I like Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, the Eagles, music like that." Burbank, 57, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School in Philadelphia, was picked nearly two years ago by the NFL and its players association to arbitrate disputes involving their collective bargaining agreement.
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