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NEWS
February 10, 2010
Why am I not surprised? Once again, Maryland politicians put their own pockets and special interests in front of the consumers (" Wine-shipment ban might stay in place," Feb. 8). Too bad our elected folks hide behind lame excuses like the fear of additional underage drinking. How naive. Like ordering wine on-line is the first thing a theenager is heading out to this week's party. I can hear them now. "Why Mary, are they having veal at John's house when his parents leave town? I was thinking of a nice Pinot Noir from Oregon."
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  STYMIE Holding, with Mr. Mencken, that "no man guilty of golf should be eligible for office of trust or profit under the United states," I am mercifully unacquainted with the terminology of the game and was unaware that the word of the week originated on the links in Scotland.  A stymie  (pronounced STY-mee)
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NEWS
January 19, 2010
Why has The Sun been quiet on the "Cadillac" health care plan debate? If you're an ordinary citizen who has a "Cadillac" health care plan, you will pay a 40 percent excise tax on the plan. Unless of course you're a union member or government employee and have a "Cadillac" plan. Then you will not pay the tax. President Obama promised to change the way Washington does business. Special interests and the influence of lobbyists was going to end. It's time for The Sun and the national media to call him on it. Len Bollinger Send your comments to talkback@baltimoresun.
NEWS
May 25, 2014
The article "Kamenetz and developer funding chest for campaigns" (May 21) made it clear that County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and the moneyed development interests that support him want Councilwoman Vicki Almond out of office because she does not automatically do what they want her to do. They have contributed obscene amounts of money to defeat her because she votes for what she thinks is best for her constituents and Baltimore County. I am proud that she has questioned the administration's actions on labor issues and sweetheart deals for developers.
NEWS
By Michael Barnes and Connie Morella | August 10, 2010
With the congressional election season ramping up for this fall, it's impossible to ignore the ugly influence that money has on our elective system. As Republican and Democratic former members of Congress, we have seen this influence firsthand. Money severely impacts who can run for office, who gets elected and who has a seat at the table when policy is made. It casts a pall over our government that must be addressed if we are to realize our basic democratic ideal of government of, by and for the people.
NEWS
May 28, 2010
It seems that the Baltimore City Council has once again sided with special interest groups instead of the health and welfare of Baltimore City residents. The beverage tax is a way to raise significant revenue without a significant cost to consumers. It is hard to believe that business owners will suffer due to a 4 cent tax. If the City Council were serious about raising revenue, they would increase it to 10 cents. If consumers chose not to purchase unhealthy beverages due to a 4 cent increase, so be it. Milk and juice are excluded from the tax and can be healthier options.
NEWS
By Renee E. Fox, Tina L. Cheng and Maureen Black | May 16, 2014
Next week, the Senate Appropriations Committee will decide whether to allow special interests - rather than science - to determine which foods can be provided through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). WIC, celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, currently serves more than half of all infants born in the United States and more than 146,000 women and children here in Maryland. The WIC food package provides nutrition and breastfeeding support to low-income and nutritionally vulnerable pregnant and breastfeeding moms and children up to five years of age. The effect of nutritional deficiencies on young children can be devastating and enduring.
NEWS
By Ralph Benko | March 2, 2010
We send our elected representatives far from home to conduct the people's business. We send them to Washington, D.C., where they form what our flyboys (and flygirls) call "a target-rich environment" for the lobbyists and for the political party leadership. We send them far from us … to conduct our business. There was no other way in the 18th and 19th centuries and most of the 20th. In the 21st century, of course, this is absurd. As things now stand, it is too easy for lobbyists and party leadership to get at our elected legislators.
NEWS
July 26, 1994
It's election season, and everyone wants candidates to talk about the issues. That includes special-interest groups.This year, every organization from the Maryland Diabetes Association to the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association is bombarding politicians with questionnaires designed to pin them down on matters near and dear to their hearts.These surveys make candidates uneasy. In Anne Arundel County, District 32 state Senate candidate Ed Middlebrooks says that's because many of them seek firm "yes" or "no" answers to complex issues, leaving no room for a middle ground or an open mind.
NEWS
By John Fairhall and Karen Hosler and John Fairhall and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | February 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton was right about everything except the timing when he warned Monday that special interests would begin attacking his economic program "within minutes" of the conclusion of his speech to Congress tonight.In fact, the attack has already begun, from coal companies and presumably from other industries concerned about an expected broad-based energy tax.On Capitol Hill, three representatives of ARCO, a major oil and chemical company, met in secret yesterday with six aides to members of the powerful House Ways and Means Committee, and discussed the tax issue over turkey sandwiches.
NEWS
By Renee E. Fox, Tina L. Cheng and Maureen Black | May 16, 2014
Next week, the Senate Appropriations Committee will decide whether to allow special interests - rather than science - to determine which foods can be provided through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC). WIC, celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, currently serves more than half of all infants born in the United States and more than 146,000 women and children here in Maryland. The WIC food package provides nutrition and breastfeeding support to low-income and nutritionally vulnerable pregnant and breastfeeding moms and children up to five years of age. The effect of nutritional deficiencies on young children can be devastating and enduring.
NEWS
April 28, 2014
The insidious piece of legislation to temporarily ban a wind farm in Somerset County is an appalling example of the politics of special interests at work ( "Gone with the wind farm?" April 20). The bill is completely unnecessary to protect the mission of Patuxent River Naval Air Station or, for that matter, the bottom lines of the defense contractors who are behind it. What the bill does do is to give one region of the state, an affluent area, veto power over the economic development of another area, which happens to be its poorest.
NEWS
February 10, 2014
I recently read the "Campaign reform in action" (Feb. 5) editorial endorsing public financing of political campaigns, and I could not agree more. As a young person and relatively new voter, contending with the post-Citizens United election system is disheartening. I'm fresh out of college and work for a nonprofit, and with big elections coming up in Maryland and across the country, it's one of the first opportunities my peers and I will have to donate to candidates we support, albeit in a small way. Unfortunately, it feels like our contributions are meaningless pittance in comparison to multi-million dollar donations from special interests.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 10, 2013
Annapolis has been giving in to angry citizens since the burning of the good ship Peggy Stewart for violating the tea boycott in 1774. Now a plan to polish the aging City Dock is about to go up in smoke, too. Mayor Josh Cohen has yielded to a group of fusty historic types who don't want to see a brick moved, merchants who fear competition and Edward Hartman, who holds the city hostage for two boat shows a year and doesn't want to lose a square foot...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
Dr. Carlton Lasley Sexton, a retired Baltimore internist who was also a member of the clinical faculty of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, died July 20 of pneumonia at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. The former longtime Stevenson resident was 87. The son of a businessman and a homemaker, Dr. Sexton was born and raised in Pensacola, Fla., where he graduated from Pensacola High School. He combined his undergraduate and medical school education in the Navy's V-12 program, an accelerated course of study during World War II that was designed to prepare physicians for military service.
NEWS
April 30, 2012
The Sun finally got one thing right: A special session of the Maryland legislature is needed - but not for the reasons stated in your editorial ("Twice as nice?" April 25). King Marty and his clown princes, Mike and Michael, need to reverse the shell game they've been playing with their subjects for the last several years. Every year, the king raises taxes to fund "shortages" in, alternately, the education, transportation and public safety budgets. Then, when the peasants are not looking, they shift the money to the special interests - satisfying their big-time donors - and to failed social programs.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | February 23, 2007
A proposal aimed at reducing the influence of special interests in legislative campaigns by having Maryland taxpayers pay for them was debated in a state Senate committee yesterday. The bill's primary Senate sponsor, Prince George's County Democrat Paul G. Pinsky, said the bill would reduce the appearance of favoritism among legislators and enable candidates to focus on issues, not fundraisers. To be eligible for "public financing," candidates would have to raise seed money in sums of $5 or more from about 350 registered voters in their districts in addition to $6,750 in other contributions.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | March 27, 2012
One week after Maryland received a D- for corruption risk on a national report, legislators are poised to cement crony capitalism into the state code. Allegedly designed to expedite major developments and create jobs, legislation supported by Gov.Martin O'Malleyoutlining rules for public-private partnerships passed the House on Monday. The amendments in HB 576 - which give public-private partnerships special legal status, and do it retroactively - show this legislation is about one project near and dear to the O'Malley administration: State Center.
NEWS
March 19, 2012
There is no better way to support democracy than to give people the information they need in order to make informed decisions. Taxpayers and stockholders alike deserve to know what corporate and union funds are being spent on elections. TheU.S. Supreme Court's ruling in the Citizens United case may have defined money as a form of free speech but it was decidedly anti-democratic. If Congress wants to demonstrate that it represents the people rather than the special interests, it could do so in no clearer way than to pass the Democracy Is Strengthened by Casting Light On Spending in Elections, or DISCLOSE Act, which is currently stalled in the House and Senate.
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