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NEWS
July 26, 1994
It's election season, and everyone wants candidates to talk about the issues. That includes special-interest groups.This year, every organization from the Maryland Diabetes Association to the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association is bombarding politicians with questionnaires designed to pin them down on matters near and dear to their hearts.These surveys make candidates uneasy. In Anne Arundel County, District 32 state Senate candidate Ed Middlebrooks says that's because many of them seek firm "yes" or "no" answers to complex issues, leaving no room for a middle ground or an open mind.
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NEWS
May 16, 2011
Maryland law allows small political contributions to be bundled together and reported as "lump sums" in disclosure reports, and to hear defenders of the practice talk about it, the tactic is merely the campaign finance loophole for the little guy. The fat cats have their limited liability corporations, personal loans and political slates that allow them to funnel tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars into candidates' campaign accounts with no...
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NEWS
April 3, 1994
It's all about money. Your money. Much of what Congress or the General Assembly does affects your pocketbook. Problem is, it also affects other pocketbooks. Sometimes deep ones. Owned by people who don't mind sharing a little of their wealth with the legislators whose decisions affect how well those pocketbooks are filled. Two articles last Monday neatly illuminated the connection.Reporter John W. Frece explained from Annapolis how the bills drawing the most attention in the legislature's closing weeks involve one business interest battling another.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | September 8, 2003
TO A LARGE EXTENT, hypocrisy is the coin of the realm in politics. "Do what I say and not what I do" is often the thought of the day in our nation's capital, from both sides of the aisle. With a wink and a nod to special interest groups, some lawmakers and some administrations can betray the trust of the American people. Such betrayals take place because of campaign contributions, out of fear of the special interest group or as a favor to friends. Whatever the reason, the result is detrimental to the vast majority of taxpayers.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
More campaign contributions, Mr. Gilchrest?Surprised campaigners for 1st District congressional candidate Wayne T. Gilchrest are hearing exactly that question after they launched a radio ad poking fun at opponent Tom McMillen's numerous flights abroad and across the country.Based on a report that listed Mr. McMillen as among the top 100 congressmen to have accepted free travel and accommodations from special interest groups, the ad depicts the Democratic candidate being pampered by a flight attendant.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | July 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Liberal Democratic Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and her conservative GOP Senate challenger, Alan Keyes, finally have something in common. They both collected the majority of their large campaign contributions from outside Maryland.During the first six months of this year, Ms. Mikulski received 55 percent of her large donations -- those over $200 -- from out of state. The figure for Mr. Keyes was 72 percent, Federal Election Commission records show.For Ms. Mikulski, that means $109,979 of the $199,626 she received in large contributions between Jan. 1 and June 30 was from outsiders.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM and BRIAN SULLAM,Brian Sullam is a reporter for The Sun | December 22, 1991
Among the six Democrats vying for the party's presidential nomination who debated last Sunday, the issue that created the most contention was not health care, economics, foreign relations or even trade. It was campaign contributions.Jerry Brown, the former governor of California, created a stir when he implied that his opponents were bought and paid for by special interest groups. Mr. Brown focused his comments on contributions made by Political Action Committees, better known PACs, pointing out that General Electric, the parent company NBC Television which was broadcasting the debate, gave $350,000 in PAC contributions to federal elected officials.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | April 14, 1992
A non-partisan political organization has established a data base and a toll-free number to aid voters who have questions about presidential, congressional and gubernatorial candidates.The information is available through the Center for National Independence in Politics, a non-profit group that provides voters with information about how political candidates stand on a variety of issues.The center's data bank includes biographical information, campaign financing data, voting records and evaluations of candidates made by special interest groups ranging from the National Rifle Association to the American Civil Liberties Union.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 10, 1994
U.S. Senate candidates Paul S. Sarbanes and Bill Brock have made their respective ties to Maryland a strong campaign theme this fall, yet both are relying heavily on money from outside the state.Fund-raising records show that of the $1.7 million Mr. Sarbanes had raised by late August, at least 38 percent came from political action committees, which make donations for special interest groups -- usually from other states.Moreover, out-of-state money accounted for nearly three quarters of the contributions from individuals listed by the Sarbanes campaign.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | September 8, 2003
TO A LARGE EXTENT, hypocrisy is the coin of the realm in politics. "Do what I say and not what I do" is often the thought of the day in our nation's capital, from both sides of the aisle. With a wink and a nod to special interest groups, some lawmakers and some administrations can betray the trust of the American people. Such betrayals take place because of campaign contributions, out of fear of the special interest group or as a favor to friends. Whatever the reason, the result is detrimental to the vast majority of taxpayers.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1997
While some Westminster parents are angry at South Carroll residents for spiriting away the new high school originally planned for Cranberry Road South, Jean Repsher is pondering the sincerest form of flattery."
NEWS
July 14, 1996
Planning group in action an eye-openerI was disgusted after reading your article dated June 19, regarding the Carroll County planning commission members changing their vote on a number of major subdivisions after the public left. So, as a concerned citizen, I attended the next meeting on June 28 to see for myself what transpires at them.One of the items on the agenda was to adopt guidelines for determining inadequate facilities for schools. I questioned how many of the commissioners had actually visited overcrowded schools.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
Legislation that could potentially save motorists hundreds of dollars annually in insurance premiums is sputtering in the General Assembly.Facing vigorous opposition from trial lawyers, doctors and insurance companies, supporters of Gov. Parris N. Glendening's auto insurance reform bill now rate the proposal's chances as iffy -- chiefly because of lukewarm public support.Baltimore drivers long have felt the pinch of insurance rates that can be two or three times higher than those of their suburban and rural counterparts.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 10, 1994
U.S. Senate candidates Paul S. Sarbanes and Bill Brock have made their respective ties to Maryland a strong campaign theme this fall, yet both are relying heavily on money from outside the state.Fund-raising records show that of the $1.7 million Mr. Sarbanes had raised by late August, at least 38 percent came from political action committees, which make donations for special interest groups -- usually from other states.Moreover, out-of-state money accounted for nearly three quarters of the contributions from individuals listed by the Sarbanes campaign.
NEWS
September 18, 1994
Government on Air: Brawn, No BrainsAs an employee who commutes daily from Anne Arundel to Howard County, I will be subject to the Environmental Protection Agency's employee commuter program -- the topic of your July 23 editorial, "One Metro Area, One Airshed."While my neighbors who work for the federal government in Washington can commute alone, I must find someone with whom I can share my ride to and from work.Employer trip reduction programs are costly and have only a slight effect on pollution.
NEWS
July 26, 1994
It's election season, and everyone wants candidates to talk about the issues. That includes special-interest groups.This year, every organization from the Maryland Diabetes Association to the Maryland Trial Lawyers Association is bombarding politicians with questionnaires designed to pin them down on matters near and dear to their hearts.These surveys make candidates uneasy. In Anne Arundel County, District 32 state Senate candidate Ed Middlebrooks says that's because many of them seek firm "yes" or "no" answers to complex issues, leaving no room for a middle ground or an open mind.
NEWS
September 18, 1994
Government on Air: Brawn, No BrainsAs an employee who commutes daily from Anne Arundel to Howard County, I will be subject to the Environmental Protection Agency's employee commuter program -- the topic of your July 23 editorial, "One Metro Area, One Airshed."While my neighbors who work for the federal government in Washington can commute alone, I must find someone with whom I can share my ride to and from work.Employer trip reduction programs are costly and have only a slight effect on pollution.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | November 1, 1990
Writing home from Annapolis to his rural constituents almost 15 winters ago, freshman Del. Roy Dyson displayed the disarming naivete that had won him the hearts and votes of Southern Marylanders during the previous November election.Dyson, baby-faced and at 25 the youngest member of the General Assembly, was describing his first encounter with special interest groups.Lobbyists had wined and dined him at a local restaurant, he said in a column published in a local weekly newspaper, and he wasn't wild about the experience.
NEWS
April 3, 1994
It's all about money. Your money. Much of what Congress or the General Assembly does affects your pocketbook. Problem is, it also affects other pocketbooks. Sometimes deep ones. Owned by people who don't mind sharing a little of their wealth with the legislators whose decisions affect how well those pocketbooks are filled. Two articles last Monday neatly illuminated the connection.Reporter John W. Frece explained from Annapolis how the bills drawing the most attention in the legislature's closing weeks involve one business interest battling another.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | September 28, 1992
More campaign contributions, Mr. Gilchrest?Surprised campaigners for 1st District congressional candidate Wayne T. Gilchrest are hearing exactly that question after they launched a radio ad poking fun at opponent Tom McMillen's numerous flights abroad and across the country.Based on a report that listed Mr. McMillen as among the top 100 congressmen to have accepted free travel and accommodations from special interest groups, the ad depicts the Democratic candidate being pampered by a flight attendant.
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