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NEWS
January 19, 2007
James L. Pryor Jr., a retired travel agency owner and golfer, died of complications from orthopedic surgery Jan. 12 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 72. Born and raised in Charlottesville, Va., Mr. Pryor earned a bachelor's degree in 1955 from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. From 1955 to 1957, he served with the Army's Special Forces. After leaving the Army, he went to work at the former Washington National Airport as a ticket agent and later was promoted to sales.
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NEWS
June 10, 2014
I served 24 years in the United States Army, 21 of them in Special Forces, and I fought in two combat campaigns, El Salvador and Operation Iraqi Freedom. Command Sgt. Major Dan Pitzer, a former prisoner of war in Vietnam and later a senior civilian instructor for the Army's SERE school was a close friend of mine. He shared many experiences with me about his four years as a captive of the Viet Cong. Unlike Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, Sergeant Pitzer did not "walk away" from his unit and actively seek refuge with the enemy ( "Bergdahl is free, but at what cost," June 9)
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is considering sending a small contingent of U.S. Special Forces to Somalia to help track down and seize Mohammed Farah Aidid, the fugitive warlord, a senior State Department official involved in U.S. policy on Somalia said yesterday.The official, Ambassador David H. Shinn, who has just completed an inspection of United Nations operations in Somalia, said the move is being considered as part of an accelerated review of U.S. policy in Somalia ordered by the White House on Monday.
NEWS
May 8, 2014
As the details of the Benghazi catastrophe continue to unravel, it is so sad because in retrospect the deaths of Ambassador Chris Stevens and his three cohorts could have been avoided. It has been interesting to discover through some research that Ambassador Stevens completely understood the importance of a special forces team to aid in the security of his embassy personnel. He believed that by explaining his concerns, the Defense Department would postpone the decision so he could have time to work with the Libyan government and get diplomatic immunity for the special forces.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun Reporter | September 24, 2006
MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. -- So many of America's special operations commandos have been thrown into combat in Iraq and Afghanistan that only a handful of the elite troops are available for the quiet but critical work of training local security forces and stabilizing governments elsewhere -- raising worries about al-Qaida and related terrorist groups expanding in other parts of the world. The demand for Army Green Berets, Navy SEALs and other highly trained units in battle, which senior military commanders expect will last for the foreseeable future, is a tough problem for the military and for its relatively small and overstretched special operations forces centered here in a bustling wartime headquarters.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2002
WASHINGTON - They were crucial to the defeat of the Taliban government, calling in precision airstrikes while huddled in the hills with Afghan allies. And these shadowy warriors are playing an increasingly larger role in the overall war on terror, training foreign troops from the gorges of Georgia to the steamy jungles of the Philippines. Now, military leaders are looking at these special operations forces - from the Army's Green Berets to the Navy's SEALs - with heightened interest, proposing to increase their numbers, provide new equipment and set up more training missions with rank-and-file troops.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | March 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration has dispatched elite Army training teams to Africa in recent months in an effort to establish a low-cost U.S. military presence in a region rife with political and economic instability, terrorism and guerrilla warfare.The increase in U.S. military activities has occurred over the past 20 months, ever since the Army Special Operations Command officially reactivated the 3rd Special Forces Group -- a Vietnam War-era Green Beret unit -- for extensive security assignments in Africa and, to a lesser extent, in the Caribbean.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
Men in shorts and T-shirts pumped out push-ups. Men in camouflage packed their equipment into boxes. Another knot of men listened to a squat sergeant chew them out for dawdling. "Get it done," he repeated between expletives.All of them belonged to two Maryland National Guard green beret companies reporting yesterday for active duty to the Gunpowder Military Reservation in Glen Arm. They are the first combat units from Maryland and the first Army Guard special forces units in the country to be activated for the gulf crisis.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 8, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon wants a double-digit percentage increase in the budget for its special operations troops - the elite commando force that includes Army Green Berets and Navy SEALs - saying they are an important tool in the war on terrorism and pointing to their success in ousting the Taliban from power in Afghanistan. "The global nature of the war, the nature of the enemy and the need for fast, efficient operations in hunting down and rooting out terrorist networks ... have all contributed to the need for an expanded role for the special operations forces," Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld told reporters at a news conference yesterday.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Staff writer Will Englund contributed to this article | December 23, 1995
KISELJAK, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- To all those in the Cardinal Gibbons High School class of 1970 who remember Frank Bohle as an under-whelming football player, has the Army got a surprise for you:Lieutenant Colonel Bohle is leading a Special Forces battalion in Bosnia, overseeing a highly sensitive job of smoothing communications among armies that speak different languages."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Chief Petty Officer Tori Novo says she finds herself saying "no" to young people who want to ship out to sea with the Navy more often than she used to. A recruiter for seven years, Novo says she has seen the standards for enlisting in the Navy become tougher. And that means more young people who desperately want to join the Navy — for a career with a steady paycheck, for educational opportunities, for a chance to serve their country — don't make the cut. Many of those applicants — the ones "who would beg on their hands and knees to get in" — might make excellent sailors, Novo says.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
You can't complete a Tough Mudder alone - the grueling 10- to 12-mile course with more than 20 obstacles designed by British Special Forces is set up to make sure of that. And of the expected 14,000 people participating in the Mid-Atlantic challenges this weekend in Gerrardstown, W.Va., perhaps no one understands this fact more than Baltimore resident Kate Robertson, 29, and her team. Helping one another navigate obstacles that border on cruel and unusual punishment - such as army-crawling on a layer of ice to avoid electric wires overhead - proves even more challenging when one of your teammates is a paraplegic.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
A Special Forces soldier from Baltimore County was killed Saturday in Afghanistan, officials said. Army Staff Sgt. Brandon Robert Pepper, a 1999 graduate of Kenwood High School in Essex, was on patrol in Ghazni province in Eastern Afghanistan when his unit was attacked by insurgents, according to Army Special Forces Command. He was 31. In a statement, his family called him "A good brother, a caring brother, a loving brother. " "Brandon was a good friend to all of us, and was always willing to help.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2011
The buzz of propellers drifted down over the airfield at Aberdeen Proving Ground as the stubby gray plane came into view. The loadmaster from the Maryland Air National Guard crew dropped the rear hatch open. One by one, six soldiers filed out of the airplane and into the sky. Special Forces soldiers with the Maryland National Guard spent the day Friday jumping out of the new C-27J Spartan, one of four the Guard will begin deploying to Afghanistan next year. The twin-engine turboprops, which may be used to transport cargo or troops, replace the Guard's eight C-130J Hercules.
NEWS
By Lawrence Korb and Lucy Panza | October 18, 2011
With the recent announcement that Australia will allow its female soldiers to serve in all combat roles, including the special forces and infantry, the United States government is once again confronted with an age-old question: Why are American women still denied the chance to serve their country equally on the basis of their sex? American women now make up 14 percent of our armed forces and, as of 2008, there were 57 female generals or admirals on active duty, including six with three-star rank and one who had achieved four stars.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2011
There is a motto etched on a Navy SEAL training school building in California: "The only easy day was yesterday. " It captures the grit and willpower required to be a member of the Navy's elite force, a group that includes Naval Academy graduates and is supposed to have the training and smarts to be sent on any mission, anywhere in the world at any time. Sunday's operation was one that two presidents have called America's No. 1 priority: Bring Osama bin Laden to justice. It shoved the SEALs into the limelight.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 18, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - With still no sign of President Saddam Hussein, American Special Forces captured one of his half-brothers, a former intelligence chief who is the third on a list of 55 Iraqis wanted by U.S. authorities to be captured so far. Other ghosts of the old regime are emerging: Relatives of about 700 Iraqi soldiers killed in the war picked through shallow graves yesterday at a military hospital in southern Baghdad, as another mass grave of 1,600...
NEWS
April 4, 2004
Aaron Bank, 101, known as "the father of the Green Berets" for his role as the first commander of the Army's elite Special Forces, died Thursday in Dana Point, Calif. In 1952, the Army approved 2,300 spaces for men in a Special Forces unit, the 10th Special Forces Group, at Fort Bragg, N.C. Colonel Bank was a key figure in pushing for its creation.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
A fter months of deliberation, President Barack Obama is scheduled to reveal his strategy for the war in Afghanistan on Tuesday. According to numerous news reports over the weekend, he will announce plans to send about 30,000 more troops to the region. That decision - which comes close to fulfilling Gen. Stanley McChrystal's 40,000-troop request - may be the safe move politically by a Democrat worried about looking soft in the war on terror. But we fear that it will prove to be a mistake.
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