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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Dozens of Baltimore classrooms could be staffed by long-term substitutes when school begins in less than two weeks, a plan drawing concern particularly because special-education students — who struggle the most academically — could be the largest group affected. System leaders and local advocates are expressing reservations about the plan to fill some of the system's 190 teacher vacancies. David Stone, vice chair of the city school board, said poor performance on state tests by special-education students this year shows that stability in their classrooms is important.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Dozens of Baltimore classrooms could be staffed by long-term substitutes when school begins in less than two weeks, a plan drawing concern particularly because special-education students — who struggle the most academically — could be the largest group affected. System leaders and local advocates are expressing reservations about the plan to fill some of the system's 190 teacher vacancies. David Stone, vice chair of the city school board, said poor performance on state tests by special-education students this year shows that stability in their classrooms is important.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
Patricia Cook-Ferguson, a longtime Baltimore teacher and president of the Baltimore County NAACP known for wearing multiple hats in advocating for youth education and civil rights advancements, died Wednesday of complications from lung cancer. She was 56. "She was the heart and soul of our chapter," said Tony Fugett, who as first vice president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People chapter will assume Mrs. Cook-Ferguson's responsibilities. Mrs. Cook-Ferguson had been ill for about a year, and was hospitalized about three weeks ago at Northwest Hospital, where she died in hospice care, said her son, Carlton Ferguson Jr. The NAACP chapter described Mrs. Cook-Ferguson as an "ardent supporter of civil rights and equal justice," and she was lauded as a leader in the Baltimore Teachers Union and the American Federation of Teachers in Maryland, where she had held multiple positions.
NEWS
May 29, 2014
Sandra H. French Age : 70 Occupation : Retired Educator Education: A.B. Mulhenberg College, English major with Education and Spanish minors Postgraduate work at Loyola College, 30 credits in English and Education Master's Equivalent Certificate: Maryland State Department of Education Previous elected office/community involvement : Governor's Appointee, Commission on Special Education, Access and Equity...
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sun Staff | August 9, 2005
In a tense and at times heated federal court hearing, city school officials unveiled yesterday a plan to hire two outside consultants to turn around its beleaguered special-education program while state officials maintained they need to take control of much of the system's operations. U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis presided over the all-day hearing - to be continued tomorrow - to determine which of three proposals to put into place to prevent what he deemed "a crisis" - the continuing failure to provide services to the city's special-education students.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 8, 2010
Saying that Baltimore's schools have made great strides in the past several years toward providing better teaching to special education students, a federal judge ended 26 years of oversight of the school system and paved the way for a final settlement in two years. U.S. District Court Judge Marvin Garbis accepted an agreement from the parties in a lawsuit that began in 1984 when the Maryland Disabilities Law Center filed suit on behalf of several special education students saying they were not being offered adequate services.
NEWS
January 27, 1991
County school officials are looking for community residents to serveon a review committee that will spend the remainder of the 1990-1991and 1991-1992 school years evaluating the special education program.Applicants must live or work in Howard County, be available for committee meetings and be committed to objectivity through the process.Application forms are available from the Department of Education assessment office at 313-6701.The applications must be postmarkedno later than Feb. 1.Applications are to be submitted to PhyllisH.
NEWS
By Michael S. Rosenberg | October 9, 1998
LIKE MOST special educators I know, I chose the teaching profession because of a deep commitment to children, fueled by the belief that all students, regardless of socioeconomic status or disability, can benefit from an appropriate education.Consequently, the recent series in The Sun "Lost Learning" filled with an uneasy combination of thoughts and feelings. For example, I was angry that so many city students were unable to learn to read and outraged that compensation for such deficiencies took the form of electronic gadgets and cruises in the Caribbean.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 6, 2013
A bill introduced in Annapolis this legislative session would make it easier for parents to challenge school systems when they believe their special education students are not receiving a proper education. Senate Bill 691, introduced by Sen. Karen Montgomery, a Montgomery County democrat, seeks to shift the burden of proof to local school systems in due process hearings, which advocates say are usually burdensome for parents who are often outnumbered, overwhelmed and outspent when they go before an administrative judge to settle disputes.  Due process hearings--which mirror civil court trials--are one of the pivotal rights afforded to parents under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Staff Writer | May 7, 1993
Doris Moody said her grandson missed five months of classes last year because the Baltimore school system couldn't find a slot for the special education student who has emotional problems and dyslexia, a reading impairment.And after her grandson, Carl Jones, 13, was accepted into Herring Run Middle School last year, he had no regular teacher for two months. Instead, a teacher's aide ran the class while the teacher was out sick, said Ms. Moody.She is so frustrated with the school system that she's now looking for a private school for Carl.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
The publisher of the "Curious George" children's books expanded its presence in the fast-growing early-childhood education market with the acquisition of Cockeysville-based children's learning website Curiosityville. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, which publishes children's books and develops educational assessments, curriculum supplements and professional training for K-12 education, announced the purchase this week but did not disclose the purchase price. "We have looked for market extensions, and the most natural one is early childhood, served by special education and pre-K," said John Dragoon, chief marketing officer for Boston-based Houghton Mifflin.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 2, 2014
Sharon L. Friedlander, a much beloved Baltimore County public schools special education teacher, died Jan. 24 of giant cell myocarditis, a rare disease that attacks the heart, at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The longtime Pikesville resident was 59. "Sharon had a smile and a 'Good morning' for everyone and greeted them whether she knew them or not. She was kind to every single person and you couldn't help but love her," said Connie J. Berman, a Baltimore County public schools special education teacher, colleague and a friend of 17 years.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Maryland's high school graduation rate has been climbing steadily for the past four years and reached nearly 85 percent — far above the national average — this past June, according to data released Tuesday. More students from every corner of the state are staying in school to earn a diploma, but the increases were most pronounced among Hispanic and African-American students. State education officials credited the passage of Maryland's Dream Act, which gave hope to Hispanic students who want to attend college in the state, as one of the factors for the 2.5 percentage point increase in the graduation rate for Hispanics.
NEWS
By Kalman R. Hettleman | December 5, 2013
The Baltimore Sun gets high marks for uncovering the shameful fact that Maryland ranks first nationally in improperly excluding students with disabilities from taking the leading national test of reading ability ( "Md. excluded large number of special-education students in national test," Nov. 16). These exclusions inflate the state's test scores. They also deflate Maryland's reputation as the No. 1 education state as ranked by Education Week. The exclusions help to reveal how certain practices ruin many, if not most, chances that students with disabilities have for academic success.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
Jean E. Hill, a Baltimore model and actress who later performed in three John Waters films, died Wednesday of renal failure at Mercy Medical Center. She was 67. "Jean Hill was my only African-American star. She was a talented comedian, a brave actress and a much valued member of the Dreamland acting gang I worked with in my movies," said Mr. Waters. "She had a personality almost too large for show business, and she startled closed-minded people in every level of society. Sometimes raunchy in her public life, Jean was always classy in her private one, and underneath it all was a real lady," he said.
NEWS
By Amy K. Noggle | April 22, 2013
Growing up in the 1970s, I never set foot in a school until it was time for me to go to kindergarten. However, times have changed. Over the past three decades, the number of preschools in our country has grown exponentially, and with this growth comes the expectation that children will attend preschool in order to be "ready" for kindergarten by age 5. Unfortunately, this expectation is often accompanied by great pressure to send one's child to the...
NEWS
By KALMAN R. HETTLEMAN | November 18, 2005
School boards across the country are generally rejoicing over the decision by the Supreme Court that parents who appeal their child's special-education plan, usually to an administrative law judge, have the legal burden of proving that the plan was not "appropriate" under federal law. The parents in the case, Schaffer v. Weast, which originated in Montgomery County, claimed that the school system should bear the burden of proving that the child's plan...
NEWS
January 20, 2008
Because of inclement weather at the end of last week, The Howard County Public School System's Special Education Job Fair, scheduled from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday at Harper's Choice Middle School, has been rescheduled for Jan. 31. The times and location will not be changed. Interviews that had been scheduled will be honored during the Jan. 31 job fair. Candidates who need to adjust the time of their interviews can visit www.hcpss.org. Information: Marya Pecukonis, 410-313-5694. HCC helps with student aid forms Howard Community College's office of Financial Aid Services invites students and their parents to receive free hands-on assistance in completing the 2008-2009 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
With a little yelp, lots of tears and a bouquet of flowers from her developmentally disabled twin sister, who inspired her to help students persevere, special educator Ketia C. Stokes was named Baltimore City's 2013 Teacher of the Year. The Green Street Academy teacher was surprised with the honor in an emotional gathering at the school Thursday morning, which included Baltimore schools CEO Andrés Alonso and her family. "You are the epitome of all that's good in my eyes," said Alonso, who started his teaching career as a special educator and pointed out that Stokes was the first special-education teacher to receive the honor in his nearly six-year tenure.
NEWS
Erica L. Green | March 6, 2013
A bill introduced in Annapolis this legislative session would make it easier for parents to challenge school systems when they believe their special education students are not receiving a proper education. Senate Bill 691, introduced by Sen. Karen Montgomery, a Montgomery County democrat, seeks to shift the burden of proof to local school systems in due process hearings, which advocates say are usually burdensome for parents who are often outnumbered, overwhelmed and outspent when they go before an administrative judge to settle disputes.  Due process hearings--which mirror civil court trials--are one of the pivotal rights afforded to parents under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)
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