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January 14, 1994
President Clinton did the right thing in asking Attorney General Janet Reno to appoint a special, independent counsel to look into allegations of impropriety and worse involving his and Hillary Clinton's involvement with a failed savings and loan in Arkansas while he was governor.He should have done it last week. It's unfortunate that he had to deal with this story while on his important European trip, but that's politics. His adversaries, such as Senate Minority Leader Robert Dole, believe this apparent scandal may be political pay dirt for the Republican Party, and are behaving accordingly.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
An outspoken Naval Academy professor will return to the classroom Wednesday after the academy closed an investigation spurred by complaints from midshipmen. Academy officials declined to provide details of the complaints against English professor Bruce Fleming, saying he should be afforded privacy and a presumption of innocence. "The investigation concluded and determined that Professor Fleming should return to his normal teaching duties," Cmdr. John Schofield, an academy spokesman, said Tuesday.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Wilbur D. "Woody" Preston Jr., a retired partner in the Baltimore law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston who was Maryland's special counsel during the 1985 savings and loan crisis, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. He was 90. Mr. Preston's yearlong investigation into the causes of the savings and loan crisis that swept Maryland in the mid-1980s resulted in the publication of the highly acclaimed Preston Report, which was a thorough and detailed analysis of the debacle.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2012
Wilbur D. "Woody" Preston Jr., a retired partner in the Baltimore law firm of Whiteford, Taylor & Preston who was Maryland's special counsel during the 1985 savings and loan crisis, died Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. He was 90. Mr. Preston's yearlong investigation into the causes of the savings and loan crisis that swept Maryland in the mid-1980s resulted in the publication of the highly acclaimed Preston Report, which was a thorough and detailed analysis of the debacle.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 6, 1994
The lament of White House aides that no more than Republican politics is involved in the call for a special counsel to investigate the Clintons' involvement in the Whitewater real estate deal is a classic case of whose ox is being gored.All through the Iran-contra investigations, the Republicans in power likewise dismissed as partisan politics the demand of the Democrats for an independent counsel. And while Iran-contra went directly to the matter of abuse of power in the presidency, the Whitewater case raises serious questions about possible abuse of a state governor's influence -- and possible cover-up from the White House.
NEWS
By Bob Dole and George J. Mitchell | May 18, 1999
IT IS now obvious Congress will not renew the Independent Counsel Act when it expires next month. Although we held different views about the act when we served in the Senate (Mr. Dole opposed, and Mr. Mitchell supported, the last reauthorization), we agree that an alternative is required to fill the vacuum that will follow its demise.The law's underlying purpose remains a vital one: to insure that allegations of criminal wrongdoing by high government officials are adequately investigated and prosecuted.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department named a special counsel yesterday to lead an investigation into who leaked the name of a CIA operative after Attorney General John Ashcroft recused himself from the inquiry. Deputy Attorney General James Comey said Ashcroft decided to step aside out of "an abundance of caution" that his presence could cause the appearance of a conflict of interest in an inquiry that involves the White House and agencies that include the State Department, Pentagon and CIA. Investigators are trying to determine who disclosed the name of CIA undercover operative Valerie Plame to a newspaper columnist, possibly to discredit her husband, who had criticized the Bush administration's rationale for war in Iraq.
NEWS
December 17, 1997
IT'S POPULAR these days to complain about the independent counsel law and how Attorney General Janet Reno has chosen to interpret it.She's too slow to trigger the statute, some complain. Others suggest the probes themselves are too long, too expensive and don't come up with much.Those critics may all be correct. But last week's indictment of former Housing Secretary Henry Cisnernos makes another case: that the independent counsel law sometimes functions exactly as its authors intended, creating a vehicle for the investigation of possible wrongdoing in high places as untainted by politics as possible.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2004
BOSTON - Determined to keep Massachusetts from becoming the first state to legalize same-sex marriage, Gov. Mitt Romney filed emergency legislation yesterday to permit him to hire a special counsel. The Republican governor said he would ask the special counsel to petition the state's highest court to delay the ruling that on May 17 will permit same-sex couples to wed in the state. Romney said his move would allow him to "protect the integrity of the constitutional process" and "preserve the right of citizens to make this decision rather than having it made for them by the court."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler and Jonathan Weisman and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 23, 2000
WASHINGTON - A top Justice Department investigator has recommended the appointment of a special counsel to investigate Vice President Al Gore's fund-raising activities during the 1996 presidential campaign, a senior government official said yesterday. The recommendation will go to Attorney General Janet Reno, who has twice rejected requests for an independent investigation into whether Gore broke campaign finance laws and lied about it to federal investigators. Robert Conrad, head of the Justice Department task force looking into campaign finance irregularities, interviewed Gore in April.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 4, 2008
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A new report released yesterday - hours before the polls open on Election Day - exonerates Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin in the Troopergate controversy. The investigation sanctioned by the state Personnel Board is the second into whether Palin violated state ethics law in firing her public safety commissioner, and it contradicts the earlier findings of a special counsel hired by the state Legislature. Both investigations found that Palin was within her rights to fire Public Safety Commissioner Walt Monegan.
NEWS
By RICHARD B. SCHMITT and RICHARD B. SCHMITT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 15, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a Beltway version of "Garbo Talks," former CIA operative Valerie Plame spoke out yesterday, exactly three years after her cover was blown in a newspaper column, saying that she felt betrayed by her government and that those involved "must answer for their shameful conduct" in the courtroom. A day after she and her husband sued Vice President Dick Cheney and others for conspiring to leak information about her employment, Plame spoke at a news conference at which she offered her first public comments about the case since her identity was revealed by syndicated columnist Robert Novak in an article on July 14, 2003.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | June 23, 2006
This week, a three-member board responsible for keeping the civil service free of political activity revived complaints against two former Social Security Administration employees who, during the 2004 presidential campaign, forwarded e-mails while at work revealing their allegiances. The question is how far federal workers can go in expressing their views during work hours and on government computers. It also questions whether those expressions meet the definition of "electronic leafleting" or "electioneering," which are banned under the Hatch Act. The two employees worked in the Social Security regional office in Kansas City, Mo. The first e-mail, from Leslye Sims, who now works for the Federal Aviation Administration, was titled "FW: Fwd: Fw: Why I am Supporting John Kerry for President?"
BUSINESS
By PAUL ADAMS and PAUL ADAMS,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
Legislation that would give lawmakers veto power over Constellation Energy Group's merger with a Florida utility owner may run afoul of both the state and federal constitutions, several legal experts say - raising further questions about efforts in Annapolis to deal with a crisis over electric rate increases. Constellation has threatened to sue the state if lawmakers block the merger, a move that comes amid wrangling over a 72 percent rate increase at its subsidiary, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. Legal analysts said the proposal to give lawmakers power over a utility merger has no precedent.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green and David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Maryland commuter rail chief Phillip D. Bissett is considering how to respond to a legal opinion on whether his campaign for Anne Arundel county executive puts him in violation of a law prohibiting political activity by government employees who oversee federal funds. Bissett received an opinion "within the past day" from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel, which administers the federal Hatch Act, a ban on political activity by some government workers, his campaign manager, Diane M. Rey, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2004
BOSTON - Determined to keep Massachusetts from becoming the first state to legalize same-sex marriage, Gov. Mitt Romney filed emergency legislation yesterday to permit him to hire a special counsel. The Republican governor said he would ask the special counsel to petition the state's highest court to delay the ruling that on May 17 will permit same-sex couples to wed in the state. Romney said his move would allow him to "protect the integrity of the constitutional process" and "preserve the right of citizens to make this decision rather than having it made for them by the court."
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Kenneth W. Starr, whose five-year, $46 million investigation of President Clinton sparked fierce criticism of the independent counsel law that governs his actions, will call today for that statute to be scrapped when it expires in June.The surprise testimony, to be delivered before the Senate Government Affairs Committee, might help defuse an expected barrage of blistering questions for Starr from Democrats who have lambasted him since he launched his Whitewater investigation in 1994.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan and Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 1, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department has launched a criminal investigation into allegations that Bush administration officials may have revealed the identity of a CIA operative whose husband had criticized President Bush's rationale for the war in Iraq. The investigation embroils the White House at a time when the president's reasons for going to war in Iraq are drawing increasing scrutiny and members of Congress are chafing at his request for $87 billion for the continued occupation and reconstruction of the country.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Justice Department named a special counsel yesterday to lead an investigation into who leaked the name of a CIA operative after Attorney General John Ashcroft recused himself from the inquiry. Deputy Attorney General James Comey said Ashcroft decided to step aside out of "an abundance of caution" that his presence could cause the appearance of a conflict of interest in an inquiry that involves the White House and agencies that include the State Department, Pentagon and CIA. Investigators are trying to determine who disclosed the name of CIA undercover operative Valerie Plame to a newspaper columnist, possibly to discredit her husband, who had criticized the Bush administration's rationale for war in Iraq.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
There are times when Janet Reno has to be told to speak up, when her left hand shakes uncontrollably and when she tires too soon. But the former U.S. attorney general says Parkinson's disease has not kept her from kayaking, hiking and running for governor of Florida. And that was the point of her appearance in Baltimore yesterday -- to emphasize that a disease known for its debilitating effects isn't that way for everyone. Reno recounted her experiences with Parkinson's for about 300 fellow Parkinson's patients, doctors and nurses yesterday at a forum sponsored by the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
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