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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld a Baltimore County man's conviction in the death of his wife who went missing the night she was supposed to go to a Motley Crue concert in Washington and whose body was never found. Dennis J. Tetso, 47, who was found guilty of second-degree murder in the presumed death of Tracey Leigh Gardner, lost his appeal that argued a lack of insufficient evidence to support conviction for second-degree murder. Although Gardner's body was never recovered, the court's opinion agreed with the state's arguments that Gardner's disappearance and lack of contact with family and friends and use of credit cards was enough to show that Gardner was dead.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A man convicted in a 2010 fatal shooting at a Hess gas station in exchange for $9,000 argued unsuccessfully that he should get a new trial because the judge in his case had once been the target in a similar scheme. The Court of Special Appeals upheld Walter P. Bishop Jr.'s conviction in an opinion announced Tuesday. Bishop, now 32, was convicted and sentenced to two consecutive life sentences plus 20 years for shooting William "Ray" Porter at a Joppa Road gas station in Towson on March 1, 2010.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Maryland's second-highest court upheld Friday a judge's ruling that the Cove Point gas facility can be converted to be used for exports, siding with the company that owns the plant and against an environmental group. The Sierra Club argued in court that a 2005 agreement between the organization and the plant's owner, Dominion, prevents it from being used as a base for sending liquefied natural gas abroad. Dominion disagreed, arguing that while the agreement did not explicitly mention exports, it did not preclude them.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Baltimore County officials are praising a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that the county didn't need to hire a third party to settle a 2011 dispute with the police union. The dispute centered on an incentive program the county started in 2010 to encourage good attendance among employees. If a worker used no sick time for a year, he or she would get money to buy a $100 savings bond and a congratulatory letter from the county executive. But the program was "only modestly successful," according to county officials, and the savings bond component was ended the next year.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1999
Retired Court of Special Appeals Judge Ridgely P. Melvin Jr., who was on the judicial panel that recommended the disbarment of former Vice President Spiro T. Agnew, died Saturday of heart failure at his Annapolis home. He was 82.In November 1974, Gov. Marvin Mandel elevated Judge Melvin from Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to the Court of Special Appeals, the state court that is second to the Court of Appeals in legal authority in Maryland.Colleagues described Judge Melvin as a moderate.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | September 2, 2009
Maryland's second-highest court has ruled that Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration was within its rights to fire a holdover patronage employee from former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s term. Monday's ruling - the latest in a long-running legal saga surrounding state personnel practices - was in the case of Gregory Maddalone, who was fired shortly after O'Malley, a Democrat, came into office in 2007 after defeating Ehrlich, a Republican. Maddalone, a former ice dancer, was a central figure in an investigation by Democratic lawmakers who accused the Ehrlich administration of firing longtime state employees for political reasons and hiring "loyalists" to replace them.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
An unsuccessful City Council candidate appealed to Maryland's second-highest court this week in a lawsuit alleging that Councilwoman Paula Johnson Branch should not have been allowed to run in November's election because of missing campaign finance reports. Glenn L. Ross, the Green Party candidate who lost to Branch, is asking the Maryland Court of Special Appeals to overturn a decision made in the case last week by Circuit Judge Joseph P. McCurdy Jr. On Thursday, McCurdy granted Branch's motion to dismiss Ross' case on grounds that he missed deadlines for objecting to the ballot.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
The state's second-highest court has overturned a $4 million verdict by a Baltimore County jury last year, which found that a defectively designed steering column on a Nissan pickup truck caused the death of a Carroll County man who died in a 1994 crash.The Court of Special Appeals ruled yesterday that evidence presented by lawyers for the family of crash victim Donald A. Nave failed to prove the design defect.The family's lawyers presented testimony during the trial showing that the steering column should have collapsed like a telescope on impact during the accident, but instead severed Nave's aorta, killing him instantly.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 16, 1997
The Maryland Court of Special Appeals upheld yesterday the conviction of Jane F. DeCosta, the Timonium teen-ager found guilty of being an accessory after the fact to the 1995 murder of a Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital counselor.The appellate court did not agree with any of the five arguments against DeCosta's January conviction in Baltimore County Circuit Court. She was acquitted of more serious charges in the death of Sharon Edwards, 26.Judge Barbara Kerr Howe imposed a five-year sentence, suspending all but the 15 months DeCosta spent in jail after her arrest, on the condition that DeCosta enter a locked mental health facility.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Raymond G. Thieme Jr., who presided over some of the most important trials in the county's history, was elevated to the Court of Special Appeals yesterday by Gov. Parris N. Glendening.Thieme, 65, of Pasadena, was appointed despite acknowledging during Republican candidate Ellen R. Sauerbrey's suit to overturn the outcome of the 1994 gubernatorial election that he did not vote for the man who has just promoted him.Thieme said that he recalled making the comment -- which was reported in news accounts -- but that he did not think about its effect on his chances when he applied for a judgeship on the state's second-highest court this year.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
Russell J. White, a retired trial attorney who won an acquittal in a nationally watched case in 1980 in which his client was accused of shooting boys throwing snowballs at his house, died of complications from dementia Wednesday at the Heart Home in Lutherville. The Mays Chapel North resident was 85. "He had a gift that can't be taught in a school. Russ had a wonderful way with juries," said his former law partner, Joseph F. Murphy, who went on to become chief judge of the Court of Special Appeals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
In a setback for Maryland's last drive-in theatre, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals has turned aside a request by the owner of Baltimore County's Bengies Drive-In to reinstate a jury verdict ordering Royal Farms to pay for a fence to keep light from one of its stores from encroaching on his property. In a decision issued Wednesday, Judge Andrea M. Leahy wrote that Baltimore Circuit Judge Robert Cahill was correct in setting aside the $838,000 jury verdict, which was reached following a June 2012 trial.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
An appeals court on Wednesday sanctioned the police's use of genetic material obtained in one investigation to solve other crimes, but agreed with attorneys for a burglar that questions surround the little known practice. Three judges of the Court of Special Appeals upheld the burglary conviction of George Varriale, a homeless Anne Arundel County man, which was based in part on DNA that he had voluntarily given to police to clear himself in a rape investigation . Genetic material obtained by police with consent of a suspect is not subject to the same legal protections as that compelled from people arrested for certain crimes - the profile need not be expunged from law enforcement databases if the suspect is cleared of wrongdoing, for example.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2014
A lawsuit that accuses Creig Northrop Team, Long & Foster and several mortgage firms — including Long & Foster's Prosperity Mortgage Co. — of perpetrating mortgage fraud to ease home buying and selling could go before a jury, after the Maryland Court of Special Appeals reversed a lower court decision that found the statute of limitations had expired in the case. Creig Northrop Team sold more homes than any other real estate group in the state last year and was one of the top five in the country, according to a ranking by RealTrend.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
A Baltimore judge ruled this week that she will not enforce her decision to dismiss a multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed by the former developers of the "Superblock" until an appellate court rules on the case. City officials expressed disappointment with the ruling, which they said could further slow development of the long-stalled project on Baltimore's west side. "It's always frustrating to me when the legal process is protracted and it prevents meaningful development in the city," Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
A nearly $1.7 million payment from Baltimore County to the police union to resolve a battle over retiree health care costs included about $228,000 in interest accrued while the county fought court rulings in the case. The county wrote a check last week to the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 to reimburse more than 400 retirees who the state's highest court determined were overcharged for health insurance premiums. The dispute began seven years ago, eventually reaching the Maryland Court of Appeals in 2012.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1998
With time running out before the first golfers tee off at Hayfields Country Club, opponents of the project go to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals today to keep the beloved Hunt Valley farm from becoming a golf course and housing development.A lawyer for the Valleys Planning Council, an influential land preservation group, will argue that Baltimore County erred in granting permission for the country club and adjacent housing development by failing to consider the harm the project would cause to the environment, agricultural resources and the county's history.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | September 5, 1993
Fallston residents opposed to a proposed foster-care complex in their neighborhood will take their case Friday to the Court of Special Appeals.At the center of the dispute between the Fallston Meadows Community Association and the Board of Child Care of the United Methodist Church is a $6 million home for 60 abused and neglected children that the church wants to build at Harford and Reckord roads.The community association is appealing a December 1992 Harford County Circuit Court decision by retired Circuit Judge Broadnax Cameron Jr. that upheld a special exception allowing the church agency to build the 41,500-square-foot complex on land zoned for agricultural use.In court papers filed in the Court of Special Appeals by Baltimore attorneys Paul W. Grimm, Gina M. Harasti and Pamela S. Foresman, the residents argue that Judge Cameron's ruling contradicted evidence that the home would "adversely impact the safety, health and general welfare of the community."
NEWS
April 23, 2014
Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter knows how to get County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's attention. A year and a half after Maryland's highest court upheld an arbitrator's decision that Baltimore County had overcharged a group of police department retirees for their health insurance benefits and owed them recompense, the county still has not paid and is working its hardest to avoid ever doing so. Now Mr. Finifter has threatened to hold...
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man who was found guilty of a burglary based in part on DNA evidence asked a state appellate court Thursday to throw out his conviction, arguing that police improperly kept his genetic information in the database they used to link him to a Coke can from the crime scene. George Varriale, 46, gave a DNA sample to Anne Arundel County police in 2012 as they were investigating a reported rape. The sample did not link him to that crime, but police later used it to place him at the 2008 burglary of a Glen Burnie business.
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