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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 21, 2011
Paul Thomas Baker, a retired FBI special agent who later became a private investigator, died Jan. 1 of pneumonia at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 85. Mr. Baker, the son of a letter carrier and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Irvington. After graduating from Mount St. Joseph High School in 1943, he enlisted in the Navy, where he served in the Pacific as a pharmacist technician and later as personal secretary to Rear Adm. Charles M. Oman of the Navy Medical Corps.
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NEWS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
The FBI announced Thursday that a Maryland man - who is accused killing his wife, mother and three sons in 1976 - has been added to the bureau's 10 most wanted list. Authorities say William Bradford Bishop Jr., a cultured, high-ranking State Department official, beat his wife, Annette, 37, to death with a sledgehammer on March 1, 1976 in Carderock Springs, an upper-class Bethesda neighborhood. Authorities allege he then waited for his mother, Lobelia Bishop, 68, who lived with the family, to return from walking the dog, and then killed her with the same weapon.
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NEWS
April 30, 2004
Michael Forrest Kirchenbauer, a retired special agent with the FBI, died of cancer Sunday at his home in Newark, Del. The former Baltimore resident was 58. Mr. Kirchenbauer was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson and Parkville. He was a 1963 graduate of Parkville High School and earned a law degree from the University of Baltimore. He joined the FBI in 1969 and held positions in upstate New York and Manhattan before being assigned to the agency's Wilmington, Del., office. He retired in 1996.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 10, 2013
A 31-year-old Port Deposit man was sentenced last week to 12 years in federal prison for possessing child pornography. Michael Dean Ragan Jr.'s prison term will be followed by 35 years of supervised release and he will be required to register as a sex offender in the place where he lives, where he works and where goes to school, under the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act, according to the sentence imposed Sept. 4 by U.S. District Judge Ellen L. Hollander in Federal District Court in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 27, 2008
Kathleen E. Moran, who worked in real estate sales for more than two decades and earlier had been an FBI special agent, died Sunday of a recurrent meningioma at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Parkville resident was 56. Ms. Moran was born in Baltimore and raised in Lauraville. She was a 1970 graduate of Northern High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1975 from what is now Towson University. After graduating from Towson, where she played lacrosse, volleyball and basketball, she taught and coached at Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School and Catholic High School of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | May 26, 2009
When Ava Cooper-Davis took over the Washington division of the Drug Enforcement Administration in March, she became the fourth woman in the region to head a federal law enforcement agency's field office, alongside the "special agents in charge" at the FBI, ATF and the Secret Service. While most of the SACs, as they're known, said it was simply happenstance that the best people qualified for the jobs happen to be female, others see significance in the coincidence. Or, at the very least, they think it's "cool."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Thomas H. Farrow, a retired Baltimore FBI agent who talked a gun-wielding hijacker into a surrender aboard a jet, died of congestive heart failure Monday at Rockingham Memorial Hospital in Harrisonburg, Va. The former Marriottsville resident was 82. On Jan. 2, 1973, Mr. Farrow was called to Friendship Airport (now Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport) to investigate Flight 928. A hijacker armed with a .45-caliber automatic pistol had hidden in the washroom of a Piedmont jet that had landed after a stop in nearby Washington.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
A 34-year-old Florida man pleaded guilty late Wednesday to illegally selling night vision goggles and other military style gear online to an undercover federal agent in Baltimore pretending to be an overseas buyer — a charge that could land him in prison for 20 years. Anthony J. Torresi, of Coral Gables, did not have the required U.S. Department of State license to sell the items when he posted them on eBay and then arranged to sell them to a buyer who he believed was in New Zealand, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office of Rod J. Rosenstein.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
Convicted killer Harold Benjamin Dean, the only person eve to escape from Maryland's Supermax prison, was captured by the FBI yesterday afternoon in Ohio after 10 months on the run.Dean, 40, had been working for several months as an attendant at a Sunoco service station in the Columbus suburb of Reynoldsburg, living under the assumed name of Edward R. Ratliff, federal agents said.He had been arrested under the Ratliff name May 1 in Washington, Pa., on a misdemeanor charge of receiving stolen goods but was released from jail before his fingerprints were matched in FBI records, authorities said.
NEWS
By MATTHEW DOLAN and MATTHEW DOLAN,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
A Department of Justice inspector general report obtained by The Sun found "credible evidence of serious misconduct" by agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Baltimore division who investigated the death of federal prosecutor Jonathan P. Luna two years ago. The previously undisclosed report gives new insight into the frenzied first days of the unsolved Luna investigation - with FBI agents delving into the private life and mysterious death...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2013
A Florida man who sold military-style night-vision goggles without a license to an undercover agent in Baltimore - believing him to be an overseas buyer - was sentenced to 18 months in prison and three years of probation late Wednesday, prosecutors announced Thursday. Anthony J. Torresi, of Coral Gables, had posted the goggles on eBay, and sold them to an undercover U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agent in Baltimore in 2011, prosecutors in U.S. Attorney Rod J. Rosenstein's office said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
A 34-year-old Florida man pleaded guilty late Wednesday to illegally selling night vision goggles and other military style gear online to an undercover federal agent in Baltimore pretending to be an overseas buyer — a charge that could land him in prison for 20 years. Anthony J. Torresi, of Coral Gables, did not have the required U.S. Department of State license to sell the items when he posted them on eBay and then arranged to sell them to a buyer who he believed was in New Zealand, according to the Maryland U.S. Attorney's Office of Rod J. Rosenstein.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Annapolis Alderman Mathew Silverman resigned Friday, citing time conflicts with his job as a special agent at the U.S. Department of Justice, according to city officials. Silverman, a Democrat, was elected to the City Council in 2009 while he was an Anne Arundel County police officer. He subsequently took what he has called "a dream job" with the justice department. In a Friday letter to his council colleagues and Mayor Joshua Cohen, Silverman, 33, wrote that new job responsibilities require him to be on call 24 hours a day and may conflict with his city work.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2012
The FBI has named Baltimore native Stephen E. Vogt as special agent in charge for its office in the city. Vogt started work in his new position last week, FBI spokesman Rich Wolf said. Richard A. McFeely, who previously headed the Baltimore office, left recently after just under three years to become the FBI's assistant director of criminal and cyber operations. Before coming to Baltimore, Vogt was the legal attache in Afghanistan — the personal representative of the FBI director — and also served in Iraq.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
Though his tenure as the special agent in charge of the FBI's Baltimore field office wasn't long - just under three years - Richard A. McFeely helped oversee investigations that took out high-profile targets that had been on the radar of law enforcement long before he arrived.  As he moves on to FBI headquarters to become assistant director of criminal and cyber operations, McFeely agreed to discuss some of those cases with The Sun, including the...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2012
George K. McKinney, who was the first African-American to be appointed U.S. marshal for the District of Maryland, and whose career in federal service spanned more than four decades, died June 17 of leukemia at his Northwest Baltimore home. He was 77. "It is with deep sadness that I acknowledge the passing of my dear friend, retired U.S. marshal George K. McKinney," Rep. Elijah E. Cummings said in a statement. "George held the distinct honor of being the only African-American appointed U.S. marshal to two different jurisdictions by two different presidents.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | July 22, 2009
The head of Baltimore's FBI field office has left to become the assistant director of the bureau's Inspection Division. Amy Jo Lyons, who was named Baltimore's special agent in charge in April 2008, is now responsible for internal investigations within the agency and ensuring that its programs work and are in line with FBI goals, Director Robert S. Mueller III said in a statement. Lyons was a special agent with the Drug Enforcement Administration before joining the FBi in 1990. Since then, she's investigated drug-money laundering operations, Italian organized crime and international terrorism and terrorists, including Zacharias Moussaoui, the only person tried by the U.S. in connection with the Sept.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 19, 2012
A Delaware jewelry store owner is offering $10,000 for information about a November robbery in which an 8,000-carat ruby - shaped like the Liberty Bell and worth $2 million - was stolen, the FBI announced Tuesday. Armed with hammers and a handgun, four suspects took over the Stuart Kingston Galleries in Wilmington on Nov. 1, the FBI said. They tied up employees and “smashed display cases, making off with a large volume of high-end jewelry and diamonds.” They quartet left the scene in a U-Haul can and were last spotted on Interstate 95, heading north toward Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | December 15, 2011
Baltimore attorney Stanley Needleman, 69, has been sentenced to a year and a day in federal prison by a U.S. District Court judge.  Needleman pleaded guilty in September, four months after agents from the Drug Enforcement Administration raided his downtown law office and Pikesville home and found $1.15 million in unreported income inside two safes. Agents found a ledger detailing the cash payments from his legal clients, prosecutors said. Prosecutors said at sentencing that Needleman had funneled cash into family members accounts and on ttwo occasions cashed checks for over $10,000 for convicted drug traffickers at a local liquor store but did not deposit the monies received.  He also used $30,000 in cash of his own money to post bail for a client in violation Maryland Rules of Professional Conduct, prosecutors said.
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