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Speaker Newt Gingrich

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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Staff writer Karen Hosler contributed to this article | November 16, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In remarks that reveal the personal tenor of the budget battle, House Speaker Newt Gingrich suggested yesterday that he and Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole toughened the spending bill that has led to the partial government shutdown because they felt President Clinton snubbed them on a recent plane ride.At a breakfast session with reporters, Mr. Gingrich said he was insulted and appalled that, on the long trip aboard Air Force One this month to and from the funeral of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, the president failed to invite the Republican leaders to the front of the plane to discuss the budget, and then made them exit at the rear of the plane.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | February 12, 2012
One of my favorite activities this primary season is to read the seemingly endless analyses of former House Speaker Newt Gingrich. The profiles run the gamut from glowing to scathing; just about every Washington pundit has a strong opinion of "Mr. Speaker. " Yet, most of the talking heads have not worked with the man or known him very well. I have worked with Newt, consider him a friend, but also understand the eccentricities of this fascinating leader. (I am also Maryland chairman of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign.)
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NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 3, 1995
WASHINGTON -- After trumpeting a new era of openness in the House, Speaker Newt Gingrich is considering curtailing or even canceling his morning news conferences because he doesn't like the questions and he's got an over-exposure problem.The news prompted immediate protests from the Capitol Hill press corps, which has relied on some form of daily briefings by the speaker for nearly three decades."There's obviously going to be a fair amount of consternation," said Karen Tumulty, a Time magazine reporter and member of the periodicals gallery executive committee.
NEWS
By Richard B. Schmitt and Richard B. Schmitt,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich urged Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales to resign, saying yesterday that the "self-created mess" over the firings of eight U.S. attorneys last year has hampered Gonzales' ability to do his job. "I cannot imagine how he is going to be effective for the rest of this administration," Gingrich said on Fox News Sunday. "They're going to be involved in endless hearings, which is going to take up an immense amount of time and effort. I think the country ... would be much better served to have a new team at the Justice Department."
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | December 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett introduced legislation yesterday to require members of Congress to make what he called the "ultimate" promise to voters: Take a pay cut if they fail to balance the federal budget."
NEWS
September 28, 1996
DID SPEAKER NEWT GINGRICH provide "accurate, reliable and complete information" to the House Ethics Committee probing charges that he improperly used tax-exempt funds to promote his conservative political causes? The fact that an investigating subcommittee -- divided evenly between Democrats and Republicans -- would even raise such a question and instruct its counsel to look into it further significantly elevates the "Gingrich issue" in this election.Democratic foes of Mr. Gingrich, especially Rep. John Lewis from a Georgia district adjoining the speaker's, were quick to urge that he step aside.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1996
ATLANTA -- House Speaker Newt Gingrich and his Democratic opponent, cookie entrepreneur Michael J. Coles, sparred Friday night in a fiery debate in which Coles blamed Gingrich for last year's government shutdown and Gingrich repeatedly characterized Coles as a liberal.Because the public television debate lasted only 30 minutes, the two candidates exchanged charges at a furious pace.Gingrich repeatedly linked Coles to what he characterized as the Democratic Party's liberal leadership in the House of Representatives, ridiculed him for refusing to announce his presidential preference, and made much ado about a minor violation of child labor law committed by Coles' company.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When House Speaker Newt Gingrich becomes a private citizen again in January, he might be able to earn a few bucks posing as a poster boy for retirement planning; his congressional career is an advertisement for how not to do it.When the young Turk from Georgia joined the House in 1978, he refused to participate in the congressional pension system, claiming it was too rich a deal. He relented in August 1989, but by then his principle had cost him hundreds of thousands of dollars.
NEWS
March 23, 1995
FROM A question-and-answer session with Speaker Newt Gingrich at a National Newspaper Association meeting:Moderator: Did you tell a business group that if one disagrees with editorial policy, curtailing advertising could be an effective approach for change?Speaker Gingrich: Absolutely. Absolutely. What I said -- and I'll say it anywhere -- the news media is the fourth estate. It deserves to be just as carefully scrutinized, just as critically looked at. It should be held up to the same standard as politicians or judges or anybody else.
NEWS
By Carl T. Rowan | January 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The 105th Congress seems destined to become the meanest, least productive place in America for the next two years.The fight over House Speaker Newt Gingrich has become so acrimonious, so deeply personal for scores of lawmakers that the most urgent legislative hopes are sinking fast into the funk of unprecedented partisanship.Mr. Gingrich is so wounded by scandals that he will never again be able to ramrod into law anything controversial or of consequence, even if he survives a grim public detailing of his alleged ethics violations.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,sun reporter | March 15, 2007
If former House Speaker Newt Gingrich decides to run for president, he won't be announcing it soon. "I think it is absurd to have people out here running around raising money, arguing about politics for an entire year ... to finally get sworn in January 2009," Gingrich said last night before addressing a crowd of about 1,000 at Goucher College in Towson. "I think that's just a dumb way to spend your life. And that's a lot of money. It's a consultant-full employment campaign that has nothing to do with the average American."
NEWS
March 7, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Admit it, you hate politics: the gotcha games in which a quote can be taken out of context and used as a pretext for bashing one's opponent; the sound bites replacing reasoned argument; the focus groups and pollsters who tell candidates what to say instead of encouraging them to believe in something; the concentration on gaining and then maintaining power for its own sake; the enormous cost of elections, which transforms politicians into...
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | December 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As she introduces herself next month to a national audience, incoming House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will be stressing her roots in working-class, Catholic Baltimore as a way of recasting the liberal image with which Republicans have tried to brand her. An unusual four-day schedule of festivities to celebrate her swearing-in is tentatively scheduled to begin in Baltimore on Jan. 2 at the Church of St. Leo the Great in Little Italy. Pelosi's childhood in that neighborhood, where she attended Mass, went to parochial school and learned politics at the knee of her father, Mayor and Congressman Thomas J. D'Alesandro Jr., is a key chapter of the biography that she will be promoting as she prepares to become the highest-ranking woman ever in U.S. government.
NEWS
April 24, 2003
MUCH BUZZ in Washington this week over former House Speaker Newt Gingrich's attack on the State Department. Was he fronting for hawks at the Pentagon who fear Secretary of State Colin L. Powell will convince President Bush to go squishy on Syria just when saber-rattling was beginning to work? Or is he simply a washed-up blowhard looking for a way to weasel back into the limelight? In either case, Mr. Gingrich struck a chord because he focused attention on a raging debate within the Bush administration over the most effective use of whatever postwar moment of power lingers from the conflict in Iraq.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 19, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When House Speaker Newt Gingrich becomes a private citizen again in January, he might be able to earn a few bucks posing as a poster boy for retirement planning; his congressional career is an advertisement for how not to do it.When the young Turk from Georgia joined the House in 1978, he refused to participate in the congressional pension system, claiming it was too rich a deal. He relented in August 1989, but by then his principle had cost him hundreds of thousands of dollars.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- For all the talk about how the loss of five Republican seats in the House was the undoing of Speaker Newt Gingrich, in the end it was the recognition of so many of his colleagues that the face -- and voice -- he put on the Republican Party was too great a burden for it to bear heading toward the next presidential election.Also, it was their awareness that a less divisive figure than Mr. Gingrich was needed to pull the party together and construct an effective legislative agenda.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | November 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- For all the talk about how the loss of five Republican seats in the House was the undoing of Speaker Newt Gingrich, in the end it was the recognition of so many of his colleagues that the face -- and voice -- he put on the Republican Party was too great a burden for it to bear heading toward the next presidential election.Also, it was their awareness that a less divisive figure than Mr. Gingrich was needed to pull the party together and construct an effective legislative agenda.
NEWS
May 27, 1997
ANY CHANCE FOR an impartial, blue-ribbon study of the impact of gambling on this country vanished when Congress' two top Republicans chose extremists on both ends of the social spectrum for this federal panel. President Clinton compounded the problem this month by naming three more members who are far from impartial. And, finally, the congressional GOP leaders finished the debacle by choosing an ardent social conservative to chair this panel.Instead of giving Americans a solid, down-the-middle analysis of the implications of casinos, slots parlors, sports betting and lotteries, this panel will be incapable of agreeing on much of anything.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Robert L. Livingston, the pragmatic chairman of the House Appropriations Committee, all but seized the reins of the House of Representatives yesterday after his sole remaining rival, California Rep. Christopher Cox, dropped out of the race in a show of Republican unity.Livingston's future job seems so assured that last night retiring Speaker Newt Gingrich hailed the lanky, 55-year-old Louisianian as "the next speaker of the House."In a calculated show of support, Livingston warmly greeted Gingrich at the speaker's farewell address to the political action committee GOPAC.
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