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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 24, 2013
John Hopkins professor Jon Lorsch will replace neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson as commencement speaker at the institution's School of Medicine. Lorsch will become director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences this summer. He has spent the last 12 years studying how cells make proteins, a process that can help look at why people get cancer. Carson voluntarily stepped down this month as commencement speaker for Hopkins School of Medicine and School of Education after making controversial comments about same-sex marriage.
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BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
The nation's transportation system is broken, agreed a panel of transportation wonks gathered in downtown Baltimore on Thursday, but they could not agree on how to fix it. "Transportation is broken. There's no way to fund it. America is one big pothole," said Ray LaHood, a former U.S. transportation secretary. "It will be up to the American people to say enough is enough. " Opinions for fixing it at the Greater Baltimore Committee's seventh annual transportation summit ranged from increasing federal investment in local infrastructure projects that would help address broader issues to cutting all federal investment in such projects to focus on national highway needs instead.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Judge John Hanson Briscoe Sr., scion of a prominent Southern Maryland family who served as speaker of the House of Delegates and later as a judge for the Circuit Court of St. Mary's County, died Wednesday of cancer at Half Pone Farm in Hollywood, St. Mary's County. He was 79. "John was a really great legislator and did a great job as speaker. He was very effective," said former Gov. Harry R. Hughes. "He was very honorable and smart, and I'm really glad that I can call him a good friend.
NEWS
By Lynne Agress | September 22, 2014
Now that the school year has begun, we have many questions: Is the new Core Curriculum good or bad? What about "No Child Left Behind"? How many remedial courses should a college student be allowed to take? Letter grades versus pass/fail? The questions and ensuing discussions are endless. But what about reading? If every first grader learned to read - to read well - I believe we would see many more successful students - on all levels, as well as many more successful people as a whole.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
Roy Felipe, executive director of the Howard County YMCA will be thefeatured speaker at the Columbia Business Exchange's March 6 meetingfrom 5-7 p.m. at the county YMCA on Montgomery Road.The meeting will begin with a networking mixer for exchange members and guests and a brief presentation about the YMCA and the programs it offers.Proceeds will benefit the YMCA's Financial Assistance Program. Cost is $15.Information: 381-7383.
NEWS
November 16, 1993
The shock waves from House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr.'s announcement that he is stepping down on Jan. 3 won't stop reverberating off the State House walls for months. Mr. Mitchell was a calming influence in Annapolis. His decision to quit in a hurry robs Maryland government of its equilibrium.Who will succeed the 57-year-old Kent County delegate? A compromise choice for the interim, 1994 session could well be Del. Gary Alexander of Prince George's County, who has been speaker pro tem for a year.
NEWS
June 10, 1991
After staging a one-man filibuster for six months, House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell has endorsed higher transportation taxes. That is good news for the state's economy, for highway travelers and for the state's road-improvement program.There never was much doubt that Maryland faced a crisis in transportation. Eighteen months ago, state officials bluntly told legislators -- including Mr. Mitchell -- that the cost of expanding roads, repairing bridges and adding mass-transit options would require more revenue this year.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Forced by circumstances beyond thei control, which all circumstances seem to be, to choose a new speaker, House Republicans, a proudly nonconformist and notably predictable crowd, thought long and hard, as thinking is measured here. After a few hours, they determined that the best speaker would be the man who praises the emblematic result of the last Congress, the $217 billion highway bill.Bike paths to the 21st centuryThat bill, with its more than 1,850 bicycle paths, "demonstration projects" and other acts of uncomplicated rapacity, strikes Rep. Bob Livingston as a splendid jobs program:"A lot of people are going to have highways because of that bill and a lot of people are going to have jobs because of that bill and a lot of people are going to be better off throughout America because of that bill.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1995
The speaker of the House of Delegates, Casper R. Taylor Jr., was hospitalized yesterday after complaining of chest pains. The Washington Hospital Center in Washington, D.C., reported Mr. Taylor, 60, in serious but stable condition yesterday evening.The speaker, who just last week had completed the grueling 90-day legislative session in Annapolis, complained to his family of chest pains over the weekend, said Dan McMullen, a family friend.When the pain returned yesterday after a midmorning walk around his Cumberland neighborhood, Mr. Taylor and his wife, Polly, drove to the city's Memorial Hospital and Medical Center, where he was admitted to the intensive care unit.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | April 9, 1994
Former House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., who resigned from the General Assembly in December, has been hired as a political consultant by the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.Arthur Slusark, a spokesman for the utility, said he could not say precisely what Mr. Mitchell will do for the company, or discuss the terms of his contract, because those matters are being worked out. He also said the company will not disclose how much Mr. Mitchell will be paid.But...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
Johns Hopkins University will host a former North Korean detainee, the hiker whose accident was adapted into the movie "127 Hours," and actors from "Breaking Bad" and "The Office," among several other speakers this fall. The university's annual Milton S. Eisenhower Symposium will feature journalist Laura Ling, who was detained in North Korea in 2009; former National Security Adviser Thomas Donilon; hiker Aron Ralston; RJ Mitte, who played Flynn on "Breaking Bad"; and B.J. Novak, who played Ryan on "The Office.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2014
Fourth in a series of profiles of candidates for governor. Charles Lollar was at it again last week, the only Republican on stage with the three Democrats running for governor, wooing a crowd largely unable to cast a vote in the fast-approaching GOP primary. His Republican rivals skipped the event at a Silver Spring church, but as he has done throughout the campaign, Lollar focused on charming voters in a Democratic stronghold. The ordained preacher and former tea party activist spreads a spirited message about rising above partisanship.
NEWS
June 1, 2014
There has been much tsk-tsking this college graduation season about students protesting their administration-chosen commencement speakers ( "College: where kids become leftists," May 25). The finger-waggers seem to take one of two positions: Either we weren't rude like that in my day or lefty faculty have corrupted the values we parents tried to give our children and have done away with free speech. (Set aside for the moment the question of how effective 18 years of parental influence must have been if it can be wiped out by a couple of hours a week with faculty members over four years.)
NEWS
May 30, 2014
There has been much tsk-tsking this college graduation season about students protesting their administration-chosen commencement speakers ( "It's speech season on campus - and it's notable for ones not given," May 21). The finger-waggers seem to take one of two positions: 1) We weren't rude like that in our day; or 2) Leftist faculty have corrupted the values we tried to give our children and done away with free speech. Set aside for the moment the question of how effective 18 years of parental influence could have been if it can be wiped out by a couple of hours a week with a college faculty member.
NEWS
May 28, 2014
Regarding Susan Reimer 's recent column on rejected commencement speakers, what seems hard to understand is why the school committees that choose commencement speakers seem unable to find anyone on their own campuses who might have a modicum of wisdom to impart to graduates ( "It's speech season on campus - and it's notable for ones not given," May 21). That such committees have to shop beyond their college gates to find inspiration seems to indicate either the committees' lack of imagination and rigor or their campuses' complete lack of a stimulating faculty.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | May 26, 2014
"…You should see that obedient flock who at the mere sign from me will hasten to heap the hot cinders upon the stakes in which we shall burn you for coming to meddle with us. " - Fyodor Dostoyevsky, "The Grand Inquisitor" parable within "The Brothers Karamazov. " Commencement ceremonies are meant for families and friends of the new graduates to celebrate a loved one's move to another stage in life and for the hosting school to celebrate itself and its commitment to education.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer Sun staff writer William F. Zorzi Jr. contributed to this article | November 24, 1994
The Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. announced yesterday that former Speaker of the House of Delegates R. Clayton Mitchell Jr. will oversee the company's efforts to lobby the Maryland General Assembly, in which he served for more than two decades.The announcement comes a little less than a year after Mr. Mitchell resigned as speaker of the 141-member House. The job of speaker is one of the three most powerful in Maryland government. As manager of BGE's public affairs department, Mr. Mitchell, 58, will oversee the company's three lobbyists in Annapolis as they try to influence some of the legislators that he presided over as speaker.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 22, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich said on television the other day that he's ''probably'' going to announce within the next week or so ''that I'm not going to run.''For president, that is. Maybe it's because he's under the impression that he already is president. Or more likely because reality has newly jumped up and hit him in the face.The latest Gallup poll for CNN and USA Today reports that 59 percent of voters surveyed disapprove of the job he's doing, to only 27 percent who approve.
NEWS
May 21, 2014
Faculty and students at the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School preparing to hear Visa CEO Charles W. Scharf speak at their graduation ceremony on Wednesday should be aware of his company's unsavory partnership with the National Rifle Association (NRA). Credit card giant Visa's affiliate program helps organizations market financial products to their members. Purchases made with the NRA Visa Card, however, also fund "legislative action in support of … Second Amendment rights. " In practice, this means Visa is helping to pay for lobbying against common-sense policies like background checks on gun buyers and for dangerous legislation that would force colleges and universities to allow gun on campus against their will.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 21, 2014
It is the season for graduations and graduation speeches, most of which dissolve into the sunshine, remembered by no one, but particularly not the happy graduates. That is changing. The season is now memorable for the speeches that are not given, the speakers having been driven off by student activists. Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice withdrew from her scheduled appearance at Rutgers after students protested her acquiescence to President George W. Bush during the war in Iraq.
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