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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | December 5, 2012
The late Morris Martick closed Martick's Restaurant Francais, his legendary Mulberry Street restaurant, in 2008 after a memorable 38-year run. Now, Martick's is coming back -- as a speakeasy. The operators of the speakeasy are Morris Martick's surviving brother, Alex, his nephew, Steve Shockett, and Brooks Bennett. Shockett said he and his partners hope to have Martick's Speakeasy open by early February. In that it will be a licensed, legal establishment, Martick's will not run as a literal speakeasy but as one of the new breed of drinking establishments that celebrate the speakeasy spirit with classic cocktails and trappings, like hidden entrances and minimal signage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The Martick's speakeasy we told you about last December is getting closer. Brooks Bennett, the operator of the new Martick's, said he hopes to have the establishment open in early August, pending approval of the liquor license and from the health department. The storied Mulberry Street property started out as a grocery store, run by Morris Martick's parents, who ran it as a speakeasy during the Prohibition years, and as a licensed bar from the repeal through 1970. It was then that Morris Martick, who died in December 2011, converted the property into a French restaurant.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The Martick's speakeasy we told you about last December is getting closer. Brooks Bennett, the operator of the new Martick's, said he hopes to have the establishment open in early August, pending approval of the liquor license and from the health department. The storied Mulberry Street property started out as a grocery store, run by Morris Martick's parents, who ran it as a speakeasy during the Prohibition years, and as a licensed bar from the repeal through 1970. It was then that Morris Martick, who died in December 2011, converted the property into a French restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
In mid-January, Jim Burger took a routine stroll around his neighborhood, Remington. The freelance photographer walked along the same streets and passed the same buildings he normally does. Then, out of the corner of his eye, Burger watched someone walk into a building he had long considered vacant. He knew of the corner rowhouse for its previous failures as bars: Joe's Tavern, Molly's Public House and, most recently, the Kitty Kat Bar. Curious, he followed. Without a sign outside, Burger had no idea he had entered WC Harlan, a wonderfully quaint, dimly lit bar that seemed plucked from the Prohibition era. From the black-and-white photos on the wall to the crank-to-open cash register, every well-placed detail helped transport him to a forgotten time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
In mid-January, Jim Burger took a routine stroll around his neighborhood, Remington. The freelance photographer walked along the same streets and passed the same buildings he normally does. Then, out of the corner of his eye, Burger watched someone walk into a building he had long considered vacant. He knew of the corner rowhouse for its previous failures as bars: Joe's Tavern, Molly's Public House and, most recently, the Kitty Kat Bar. Curious, he followed. Without a sign outside, Burger had no idea he had entered WC Harlan, a wonderfully quaint, dimly lit bar that seemed plucked from the Prohibition era. From the black-and-white photos on the wall to the crank-to-open cash register, every well-placed detail helped transport him to a forgotten time.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | December 3, 2003
THIS WEEK marks the 70th anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition, so to celebrate I recently mixed up a batch of speakeasy cocktails. The recipes for concoctions called Horse's Neck, Flu Cocktail and Rock and Rye came from Manhattan Oases, a book originally published in 1932 that was written and illustrated by Al Hirschfeld, the noted theatrical caricaturist who died in January at the age of 99. As a young man about town, Hirschfeld toured dozens of...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large | April 28, 1995
Speakeasy in Canton has been so successful that owner Bill Vasilakopoulos is opening a second restaurant serving continental food at the Anchorage Marina at 2501 Boston St. He's naming it Anastasia, after his mother. The first floor of the new place will have a bar, casual dining and live music. The dining room on the second floor, which has a fine view of the water, will be a little more formal. The new chef is George Platis, formerly of the Camden Club. Mr. Vasilakopoulos says he's shooting for an opening date at the end of May.* Don't miss the Culinary Extravaganza at Harbor Court Hotel on Wednesday.
NEWS
November 9, 2007
Meet the artist -- Gallery 44, 9460 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City, will present an exhibition of work by Amy Lynn and an opportunity to meet the artist at a reception to benefit Success in Style from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to noon tomorrow. Lynn's piece, called Speakeasy, is above. Admission is free; a portion of sales will be donated to Success in Style, a local nonprofit organization that supplies professional attire to disadvantaged women seeking work. 410-465-5200.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 7, 1993
Speakeasy, 2840 O'Donnell St., (410) 276-2977. Open every day for lunch and dinner. AE, DC, MC, V. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: no. Prices: appetizers, $4.95-$6.95; entrees, $7.95-$17.95.A restaurant called Speakeasy Saloon and Dining House may sound a little rough and tumble for you, but Canton's newest restaurant is actually a modest, even sweet little place. True, there's a bar in front of the downstairs dining room, and maybe on the weekend things get a little wild. But on a weeknight the bar crowd -- it looked like three or four regulars -- was quite sedate.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | October 17, 1990
A Depression-era "speakeasy," a Hard Rock Cafe, a high-technology information center and a public museum for the contemporary arts are among seven eclectic ideas city officials have to choose from for Baltimore's vacant Pier 4 Power Plant.The bids were submitted in response to the Schmoke administration's request in August for proposals for the Power Plant, which has been vacant since the Six Flags Corp. closed its nightclub there in January. The deadline for submitting plans was Monday.City officials have not made the proposals available for review, but they did release the names of bidders and brief descriptions of each proposal.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | December 5, 2012
The late Morris Martick closed Martick's Restaurant Francais, his legendary Mulberry Street restaurant, in 2008 after a memorable 38-year run. Now, Martick's is coming back -- as a speakeasy. The operators of the speakeasy are Morris Martick's surviving brother, Alex, his nephew, Steve Shockett, and Brooks Bennett. Shockett said he and his partners hope to have Martick's Speakeasy open by early February. In that it will be a licensed, legal establishment, Martick's will not run as a literal speakeasy but as one of the new breed of drinking establishments that celebrate the speakeasy spirit with classic cocktails and trappings, like hidden entrances and minimal signage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | May 22, 2012
South Baltimore's own "Speakeasy that sells pizza," Hersh's Pizza and Drinks, with its gray motifs and urbane styling, features some seriously sophisticated cocktails, courtesy of bartender Jamaal Green. The selection of libations rotates on a regular basis, keeping the flavors interesting and fresh. One such addition to the list: the Ginger Smash. The Ginger Smash, "a very seasonal rustic drink," as Green describes it, is a hard cocktail loaded with tartness thanks in part to muddled kumquats and an ounce of Clement Creole Shrubb, an aged rum drink flavored with orange bitters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | April 16, 2012
It's time to brush up on your Prohibition-era swagger, Baltimore. 1920s-era everything has made a comeback in recent years, from fashion to TV and now the Baltimore bar scene. The Fork & Wrench, new to Canton, is high on speakeasy style. Picture lush tapestry-lined bar tables, intimate, low lights and swing and blues wailing from the speakers. The cocktail menu is reflective of the age of jazz: flirty, rich, smooth and daring. But if you're looking for an extensive drink list, go elsewhere.
NEWS
November 9, 2007
Meet the artist -- Gallery 44, 9460 Baltimore National Pike, Ellicott City, will present an exhibition of work by Amy Lynn and an opportunity to meet the artist at a reception to benefit Success in Style from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. today and 10 a.m. to noon tomorrow. Lynn's piece, called Speakeasy, is above. Admission is free; a portion of sales will be donated to Success in Style, a local nonprofit organization that supplies professional attire to disadvantaged women seeking work. 410-465-5200.
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
HE HAS BEEN THE WORKing man's interviewer for longer than one can remember without looking it up. Author and oral historian Louis "Studs" Terkel -- he of summer heart surgery, he who gave us Working -- now is treating readers to his childhood passion: music. And They All Sang (New Press) is Terkel's 16th book but his first collection of interviews mined from his storied career as a disc jockey. "As an asthmatic child of eight, hearing came to me with much more ease than breathing. Bound to the hearth, I heard music I might otherwise have missed," Terkel, 93, wrote in the book's introduction.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | December 3, 2003
THIS WEEK marks the 70th anniversary of the repeal of Prohibition, so to celebrate I recently mixed up a batch of speakeasy cocktails. The recipes for concoctions called Horse's Neck, Flu Cocktail and Rock and Rye came from Manhattan Oases, a book originally published in 1932 that was written and illustrated by Al Hirschfeld, the noted theatrical caricaturist who died in January at the age of 99. As a young man about town, Hirschfeld toured dozens of...
BUSINESS
October 10, 1994
* Regis Corp., a national hair salon chain, has chosen Fran Clark, manager of the Regis Hairstylists in the Harford Mall, as recipient of its President's Achievement Award and a trip to London.* Charlestown Retirement Community, in Catonsville, has been listed in the November issue of Money magazine as being among the top senior housing/life care retirement communities in the nation.On the board* Chesapeake Bank & Trust Co. announced the election of William R. Kirk to its board of directors.
NEWS
By ROB HIAASEN and ROB HIAASEN,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2005
HE HAS BEEN THE WORKing man's interviewer for longer than one can remember without looking it up. Author and oral historian Louis "Studs" Terkel -- he of summer heart surgery, he who gave us Working -- now is treating readers to his childhood passion: music. And They All Sang (New Press) is Terkel's 16th book but his first collection of interviews mined from his storied career as a disc jockey. "As an asthmatic child of eight, hearing came to me with much more ease than breathing. Bound to the hearth, I heard music I might otherwise have missed," Terkel, 93, wrote in the book's introduction.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2003
Sam McCready sits in a blue leather wing chair that dominates the cozy northeastern corner of his cottage. He is framed in a halo of baskets in assorted sizes and colors hanging overhead. To his left is a large fireplace, encased in stone and fitted with a wood-burning stove that softly hisses. Behind him, paneled wall shelves display assorted pieces of Spode china that glisten in the pale light of a winter morning outside his windowed door. McCready's mood is both reflective and appreciative as he raises his eyes to the exposed, oak ceiling beams.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | April 5, 2001
The police dub them "roving whorehouses." A liquor board official refers to them as modern-day speak-easies that change addresses weekly. Saturday night, drawn by a flier that promised a "locked door freak fest" where "up to 30 sexy dancers" would be on hand, 50 men packed a West Baltimore after-hours club. But this time, authorities intervened, raiding the establishment. Tipped off by a neighbor, police and state liquor agents burst into Ronnie's West Side Gallery in the 2100 block of W. Lanvale St. - part of a stepped-up campaign to rid the city of unlicensed clubs where alcohol is illegally sold.
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