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NEWS
By Anna Gorman and Anna Gorman,Los Angeles Times | December 2, 2007
A study released last week by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center, reports that in families for whom Spanish is the dominant language among immigrant parents, English fluency increases across generations. By the third generation, Spanish has essentially faded into the background. Latinos recognize that learning English is key to economic success, according to the study, which was based on survey data collected between 2002 and 2007. "The ability to speak English is a crucial skill for getting a good job and integrating into the wider society," said D'Vera Cohn, a senior writer at the research center, a nonpartisan research organization that does not advocate immigration policy.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. - When infielder Jonathan Schoop won the Orioles' Minor League Player of the Year award in September 2011, he traveled to Camden Yards to accept the honor. The shy, skinny Curacao native, then 19 years old, couldn't have looked more uncomfortable on the field that day, tentatively shaking hands with staff and players while giving barely audible answers to reporters in a language that he was still learning. There was a common sentiment within the media: This is the kid who beat out top prospect Manny Machado for an award that bears the name of Hall of Famer?
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NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | May 6, 1993
Los Angeles. -- The lead story on last week's release of new figures from the 1990 census was that one out of seven residents of the United States (over the age of 5) speaks a language other than English at home.That represents 32 million people, of whom almost 9 million are resident in California. So the California ESL population (English as a Second Language) amounts to almost one in three people. Those numbers have jumped everywhere over the past decade, but again the increase is greater in California, where the Census Bureau says 239 different languages are spoken in the homes of those 9 million people.
HEALTH
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
A little bit of English isn't enough to get by at the doctor's office. Sitting side-by-side with immigrants at medical appointments, Baltimore County Department of Health interpreter Martha Lujardo tries to bridge the gap between the doctor and those with limited proficiency in English. She rewords questions as many times as it takes until she's satisfied that the patient understands the diagnosis and directions. Personal interpreters such as Lujardo are considered the ideal way to make health care more accessible to people who do not understand English.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
The Annapolis city council is set to tackle the issue of requiring some workers to speak English. Alderman Samuel E. Shropshire plans to introduce legislation that would require at least one member of any utility crew working underground to speak English. He called the bill "an important public safety measure." Shropshire said he was prompted to act after fielding complaints in the past two weeks from Ward 7 residents who were without electricity and phone and cable service for days at a time after Verizon workers inadvertently severed wires during maintenance work.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2000
At Towson University, Bryan Jablonski hid a tape recorder during class so he could later translate his teacher's broken English. At Princeton University, Bill Fedyna had four teachers in a math course for engineers. Three of them did not speak English. At the University of Missouri, Don Collins could communicate with the instructor of his chemistry lab only by jotting down questions in a notebook and waiting for a written response. "It's not so unusual," Collins said. "Almost everyone has a story like that."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 29, 2004
IT'S TWO years late, but the U.S. Department of Education has finally addressed one of the absurdities of the No Child Left Behind Act: the testing of recently arrived immigrant children in a language many of them don't understand. The department announced a few days ago that children who don't speak English will have a year's grace period before they have to take standardized tests in reading and math. That will be of particular help to districts such as Montgomery County with large numbers of immigrant children.
NEWS
By Jason Song and Jason Song,SUN STAFF | May 11, 2004
Norma Saenz struggles with English. "Sometimes, I talk to people, and I can tell they're not understanding me," she says. But Saenz, a Mexico native, had no trouble reading between the lines of statements by Comptroller William Donald Schaefer, who unleashed a tirade last week against Marylanders who don't speak English and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s pronouncement the next day that multiculturalism is "bunk." "It's like [Ehrlich's] saying: `What are you doing over here? Why did you come to this country?
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano | October 21, 1995
WHENEVER I hear about the latest effort by demagoguing politicians to make English the official language of the United States, I have to ask: Who said Americans speak English in the first place?2 After, that is, they learned to speak English.B4Patrick Ercolano writes editorials for The Sun.
NEWS
June 9, 1994
In a caption on Page 1B of most of yesterday's editions, th names Bernarette Dumorin and Yang Kim were transposed in a photograph that accompanied a story about a Howard County public school program for students who do not speak English.* The Sun regrets the error.
SPORTS
By peter schmuck and peter schmuck,peter.schmuck@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
N ews item: Rookie quarterback Joe Flacco makes his regular-season NFL debut today in the Ravens' season opener against the Cincinnati Bengals. My take: This could be a watershed day in Ravens history ... or it could be the day history repeats itself with another rookie quarterback moving right into the starting lineup. I'm going to stay positive. Flacco will hold his own. News item: The Orioles extended the contract of manager Dave Trembley through the 2009 season Friday and added a club option for 2010.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
The Annapolis city council is set to tackle the issue of requiring some workers to speak English. Alderman Samuel E. Shropshire plans to introduce legislation that would require at least one member of any utility crew working underground to speak English. He called the bill "an important public safety measure." Shropshire said he was prompted to act after fielding complaints in the past two weeks from Ward 7 residents who were without electricity and phone and cable service for days at a time after Verizon workers inadvertently severed wires during maintenance work.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | December 10, 2007
ATLANTA -- Late last month came shocking - shocking - news about the ability of immigrants to assimilate: Latinos in this country do learn English. Who knew? OK, I'm being slightly facetious, responding to just one of the strains of hysterical overreaction to illegal immigration. That complaint cites the alleged dangers of allowing large numbers of Spanish-speakers into the country, people who would tear apart the American cultural fabric andthreaten the very bulwark of Western civilization.
NEWS
By Anna Gorman and Anna Gorman,Los Angeles Times | December 2, 2007
A study released last week by the Pew Hispanic Center, a project of the Pew Research Center, reports that in families for whom Spanish is the dominant language among immigrant parents, English fluency increases across generations. By the third generation, Spanish has essentially faded into the background. Latinos recognize that learning English is key to economic success, according to the study, which was based on survey data collected between 2002 and 2007. "The ability to speak English is a crucial skill for getting a good job and integrating into the wider society," said D'Vera Cohn, a senior writer at the research center, a nonpartisan research organization that does not advocate immigration policy.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | November 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Just like previous immigrant groups, Hispanic immigrants in the United States speak little English in the first generation, but English dominates in the lives of the second generation and Spanish fades in the third, according to a study released yesterday. The classic pattern, reported by the Pew Hispanic Center, a Washington-based nonprofit research group, partly counters concerns raised in immigration debates that Hispanics in the United States will cluster in Spanish-speaking enclaves rather than assimilate and learn English, as previous immigrant groups have done.
NEWS
By Nancy E. Roman | November 15, 2006
The standoff between the United States and Iran over nuclear weapons, the military challenge in Iraq, the threatening trade war with China - the pressing issues of the day all call for dialogue and understanding. Yet there is no dialogue without speech. There is no speech without language. And while the world is busy learning English, not many Americans are reciprocating in kind. Three hundred million Chinese are learning English. By 2025, China will have more English speakers than the United States.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer created a flap two years ago when he vented his frustration about fast-food workers who don't speak English well. Yesterday, he made a pitch for state Department of Education programs that help people learn the language. "It's startling to know that almost 800,000 people in Maryland don't have a high school diploma, and 20 percent of that number don't have the English skills to get one," Schaefer said in a news release. "The return from investing in programs to help people learn and speak English and get a high school diploma can make a real difference in people's lives."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 11, 2001
Baltimore County police are searching for a 13-year-old immigrant from Mexico who disappeared Sunday evening, four days after she arrived in the United States. Secilia Del Carmen Carcamo-Deras, who does not speak English, left a note at her home in the 500 block of Castle Drive, just north of the Baltimore City line, about 7 p.m. informing her mother she was leaving, police said. "She is missing, she does not speak English, she does not know anyone else in the area, she does not have any money and the mother is extremely concerned for her well-being," said Cpl. Vickie Warehime, a police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | November 14, 2006
Taneytown became the first municipality in Maryland to pass a resolution declaring English its official language but stopped short last night of a proposed change to the city charter that had drawn criticism from civil rights groups and some residents. Mayor W. Robert Flickinger said the nonbinding English Language Unity resolution was preferable to a change in the charter, which would have been costly to implement and probably would have drawn lawsuits. Had the charter been amended, "you're stuck with it," he said.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
Comptroller William Donald Schaefer created a flap two years ago when he vented his frustration about fast-food workers who don't speak English well. Yesterday, he made a pitch for state Department of Education programs that help people learn the language. "It's startling to know that almost 800,000 people in Maryland don't have a high school diploma, and 20 percent of that number don't have the English skills to get one," Schaefer said in a news release. "The return from investing in programs to help people learn and speak English and get a high school diploma can make a real difference in people's lives."
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