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Spartacus

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By Lou Cedrone | May 2, 1991
The restored version of the 1960 ''Spartacus,'' starring Kirk Douglas, will play the Westview Cinema, rather than the Senator Theatre, as was originally announced. The film opens tomorrow.Tom Kiefaber, owner-operator of the Senator, said he decided not to show the film because the studio was not releasing it in 70mm. George Brehm, owner-operator of the Westview complex, said that the film will be shown in 35mm, in ''one of our big theaters, and with Dolby sound will look and sound exceptionally good.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2007
The Enoch Pratt Free Library's Southeast Anchor Library is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the release of Star Wars with a free party running from noon-4 p.m. tomorrow. Screenings will include the documentary The Making of `Star Wars' (1 p.m.) There also will be Star Wars characters, cake and free comic books. The library is at 3601 Eastern Ave. Information: prattlibrary.org. Film, free speech "Film and Free Expression," a series sponsored by the ACLU and showing at the Charles on Saturdays through June 2, offers Abraham Polonsky's 1948 Force of Evil, starring John Garfield and Thomas Gomez as brothers at odds over how the local mob should divvy up the numbers racket.
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By Gregory Kane | June 15, 1997
What's the manliest film of all time? According to brothers Todd and Brant von Hoffmann, authors of "The von Hoffmann Bros.' Big Damn Book of Sheer Manliness," it's the movie "Spartacus." Boy, are these guys way off!Real men know the manliest film of all time is "The 300 Spartans," which features 300 tough fighting guys in some of the cutest and sexiest skirts you've ever seen in your life. "Spartacus," for heaven's sake! The 300 Spartans could have wiped out his slave army by themselves.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 27, 2004
You know how bookstores typically have separate categories for literature and fiction? It's sort of like that with a lot of orchestral music. There's the literature-level type - your Beethoven, Mahler, all that high-art, good-for-you, heavy-reading material. And then there's the other stuff, a little less lofty in aspiration, a little lighter on the ears - the equivalent of "a good read." It's just as valuable, of course, except to incurable snobs. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is devoting itself this weekend to a program of what you might call real page-turners: Max Bruch's Scottish Fantasy for violin and orchestra and suites from two ballet scores by Aram Khachaturian, Spartacus and Gayaneh.
FEATURES
December 26, 1997
One of Hollywood's brawniest epics, director Stanley Kubrick's 1960 effort, "Spartacus" (noon-4 p.m., TNT), stars Kirk Douglas as the fearless leader of a slave rebellion in ancient Rome. Top-notch in all technical aspects, the film boasts a splendid ensemble cast of Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Peter Ustinov and Charles Laughton. Tony Curtis comes up amusingly short, however, as a slave with a curious Brooklyn accent ("I am da singa of songs").At a glance"The Mighty Ducks" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 6, 1991
It's true. They don't make them the way they used to. But that doesn't completely dispel the original impression that the 1960 ''Spartacus'' lumbered more than it shook. And adding an expunged five minutes (making a total of 197) to the restored version doesn't necessarily mean it is that much better.The film is big. The climactic battle scenes, employing some 8,000 soldiers, were shot in Spain, and this much is awesome. The final hour of the film, in fact, is absorbing, almost gripping, but there are those others hours to endure, and at times, they look like so much ''Hercules'' footage, despite the presence of some impressive names, among them Laurence Olivier, Kirk Douglas, Peter Ustinov, Charles Laughton, Jean Simmons and Tony Curtis.
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and By Janet Maslin,New York Times | April 29, 1991
Seen today, in the lovingly restored 197-minute version, the two-tiered historical pageant that is "Spartacus" says at least as much about America in the late 1950s as it does about ancient Rome.This sword-clanking 1960 epic about a slaves' uprising -- it is scheduled to open at the Senator Theatre in late May -- was the film that took a giant step toward ending the Hollywood blacklist, since its screenwriter, Dalton Trumbo, was finally freed from the onus of working under pseudonyms and credited under his own name.
FEATURES
March 12, 1991
The Senator Theater begins a special two-month film festival pTC Friday with the screening of the 1961 ''West Side Story.'' The musical will remain there through March 21.Other films scheduled:"The Sound of Music,'' March 22 to April 4;''Doctor Zhivago,'' April 5-18;''Ben-Hur,'' April 19 to May 2;''Spartacus,'' the restored version starring Kirk Douglas, opening May 3 and running open end.Tom Kiefaber, owner-manager of the Senator, said the titles were...
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 2, 1991
* ''One Good Cop'' A New York cop wants to adopt the three daughters of his partner who is killed in the line of duty. Michael Keaton and Anthony La Paglia star. Drama, comedy.* ''A Rage in Harlem'' A girl entrusted with a suitcase full of hot gold goes to Harlem, where everybody wants her and the gold. Gregory Hines and Robin Givens are in the cast. Comedy, drama.* ''Rich Girl'' A wealthy young woman gets a job in a club where she falls in love with the lead singer in the house band. Jill Schoelen and Don Michael Paul star.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 27, 2004
You know how bookstores typically have separate categories for literature and fiction? It's sort of like that with a lot of orchestral music. There's the literature-level type - your Beethoven, Mahler, all that high-art, good-for-you, heavy-reading material. And then there's the other stuff, a little less lofty in aspiration, a little lighter on the ears - the equivalent of "a good read." It's just as valuable, of course, except to incurable snobs. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra is devoting itself this weekend to a program of what you might call real page-turners: Max Bruch's Scottish Fantasy for violin and orchestra and suites from two ballet scores by Aram Khachaturian, Spartacus and Gayaneh.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 25, 2004
BSO at the Meyerhoff After you gorge 'til you pop today and shop 'til you drop tomorrow, you're going to need some relief. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra may have just the thing - a program of wonderfully evocative, atmospheric music. Yuri Temirkanov will be on the podium for Max Bruch's Scottish Fantasy, a late-19th century, rhapsodic treatment of old Scottish folk songs scored for violin and orchestra. With the BSO's concertmaster, Jonathan Carney, as soloist, you can expect a sweet tone and a high dose of lyricism.
FEATURES
December 26, 1997
One of Hollywood's brawniest epics, director Stanley Kubrick's 1960 effort, "Spartacus" (noon-4 p.m., TNT), stars Kirk Douglas as the fearless leader of a slave rebellion in ancient Rome. Top-notch in all technical aspects, the film boasts a splendid ensemble cast of Laurence Olivier, Jean Simmons, Peter Ustinov and Charles Laughton. Tony Curtis comes up amusingly short, however, as a slave with a curious Brooklyn accent ("I am da singa of songs").At a glance"The Mighty Ducks" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | June 15, 1997
What's the manliest film of all time? According to brothers Todd and Brant von Hoffmann, authors of "The von Hoffmann Bros.' Big Damn Book of Sheer Manliness," it's the movie "Spartacus." Boy, are these guys way off!Real men know the manliest film of all time is "The 300 Spartans," which features 300 tough fighting guys in some of the cutest and sexiest skirts you've ever seen in your life. "Spartacus," for heaven's sake! The 300 Spartans could have wiped out his slave army by themselves.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 6, 1991
It's true. They don't make them the way they used to. But that doesn't completely dispel the original impression that the 1960 ''Spartacus'' lumbered more than it shook. And adding an expunged five minutes (making a total of 197) to the restored version doesn't necessarily mean it is that much better.The film is big. The climactic battle scenes, employing some 8,000 soldiers, were shot in Spain, and this much is awesome. The final hour of the film, in fact, is absorbing, almost gripping, but there are those others hours to endure, and at times, they look like so much ''Hercules'' footage, despite the presence of some impressive names, among them Laurence Olivier, Kirk Douglas, Peter Ustinov, Charles Laughton, Jean Simmons and Tony Curtis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 3, 1991
'Spartacus'Starring Kirk Douglas, Laurence Olivier, Charles Laughton and Jean Simmons.Directed by Stanley Kubrick.Released by Universal.Rated PG-13.*** 1/2 "Spartacus," lovingly restored from its decay and now splashed across a big screen at the Westview, has this message for our times: Freedom's just another word for everything worth dying for.It's a madly romantic celebration of the spirit of liberation, a dream-state recapitulation of an episode in...
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 2, 1991
* ''One Good Cop'' A New York cop wants to adopt the three daughters of his partner who is killed in the line of duty. Michael Keaton and Anthony La Paglia star. Drama, comedy.* ''A Rage in Harlem'' A girl entrusted with a suitcase full of hot gold goes to Harlem, where everybody wants her and the gold. Gregory Hines and Robin Givens are in the cast. Comedy, drama.* ''Rich Girl'' A wealthy young woman gets a job in a club where she falls in love with the lead singer in the house band. Jill Schoelen and Don Michael Paul star.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 25, 2004
BSO at the Meyerhoff After you gorge 'til you pop today and shop 'til you drop tomorrow, you're going to need some relief. The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra may have just the thing - a program of wonderfully evocative, atmospheric music. Yuri Temirkanov will be on the podium for Max Bruch's Scottish Fantasy, a late-19th century, rhapsodic treatment of old Scottish folk songs scored for violin and orchestra. With the BSO's concertmaster, Jonathan Carney, as soloist, you can expect a sweet tone and a high dose of lyricism.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | May 18, 2007
The Enoch Pratt Free Library's Southeast Anchor Library is celebrating the 30th anniversary of the release of Star Wars with a free party running from noon-4 p.m. tomorrow. Screenings will include the documentary The Making of `Star Wars' (1 p.m.) There also will be Star Wars characters, cake and free comic books. The library is at 3601 Eastern Ave. Information: prattlibrary.org. Film, free speech "Film and Free Expression," a series sponsored by the ACLU and showing at the Charles on Saturdays through June 2, offers Abraham Polonsky's 1948 Force of Evil, starring John Garfield and Thomas Gomez as brothers at odds over how the local mob should divvy up the numbers racket.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 2, 1991
The restored version of the 1960 ''Spartacus,'' starring Kirk Douglas, will play the Westview Cinema, rather than the Senator Theatre, as was originally announced. The film opens tomorrow.Tom Kiefaber, owner-operator of the Senator, said he decided not to show the film because the studio was not releasing it in 70mm. George Brehm, owner-operator of the Westview complex, said that the film will be shown in 35mm, in ''one of our big theaters, and with Dolby sound will look and sound exceptionally good.
FEATURES
By Janet Maslin and By Janet Maslin,New York Times | April 29, 1991
Seen today, in the lovingly restored 197-minute version, the two-tiered historical pageant that is "Spartacus" says at least as much about America in the late 1950s as it does about ancient Rome.This sword-clanking 1960 epic about a slaves' uprising -- it is scheduled to open at the Senator Theatre in late May -- was the film that took a giant step toward ending the Hollywood blacklist, since its screenwriter, Dalton Trumbo, was finally freed from the onus of working under pseudonyms and credited under his own name.
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