Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSparky Anderson
IN THE NEWS

Sparky Anderson

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Jack Morris* ... ... ... ... 162 Saves: Mike Henneman.. ... ... ... .22 * -- no longer with team. 1990 record vs. Orioles: 7-6. Last division title: 1987 Fast facts * The Tigers figure to have 16 players aged 30 or older on their Opening Day roster. * Cecil Fielder and Mickey Tettleton had a combined 548 plate appearances last year without putting the ball in play. * In 1990 games at Tiger Stadium, an average of 9.52 runs were scored, highest in the league. * Sparky Anderson is the only manager to win a World Series in both major leagues. * Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker are entering their 14th year as a double-play combination, longest streak in history | April 4, 1991
ManagerSparky Anderson (974-860 in 12 seasons with the Tigers; 1,837-1,446 in 21 seasons)1990 record79-83, 3rd place, 9 games behind.1990 offensive leadersBA: Alan Trammell ... ... ... ... .304HR: Cecil Fielder ... ... ... ... ..51RBI: Cecil Fielder... ... ... ... 132SB: Tony Phillips ... ... ... ... ..191990 pitching leadersWins: Jack Morris* ... ... ... ... .15ERA: Edwin Nunez* ... ... ... ...2.24
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 8, 2010
Gift for gab a plus Bill Shaikin Los Angeles Times It would be too simple to say that Anderson won because he lasted, although it is true players knew there would be no point in trying to undermine the manager and get him fired. Anderson had great players, of course, especially in Cincinnati. But his genius was in making players feel good even when they faltered. The clubhouse usually opens to the media 10 minutes after a game, but Anderson would keep his clubhouse closed for 15 or 20 minutes after a tough loss.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
Chris Hoiles capped an eight-run sixth inning Tuesday night with his third career grand slam, but he said an earlier home run by Leo Gomez was the turning point in the Orioles' 12-9 comeback win over the Tigers."
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
The Atlanta Braves hadn't won a thing in seven years when they installed Bobby Cox as manager 65 games into the 1990 season. They haven't finished a full season out of first place since. So a manager must be pretty important to a baseball franchise, right? Well, consider an alternative example from Orioles history. Earl Weaver was a genius, pretty much any baseball person will tell you. He went through 15 seasons and three generations of talent without guiding a loser and retired after the 1982 Orioles won 94 games.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Evening Sun Staff | May 23, 1991
DETROIT -- A fastball that sometimes gets up to 95 mph normally wouldn't help a hitter who is struggling, but that might have been the case with Cecil Fielder last night.Not that Fielder is actually struggling. He does have eight home runs and 31 runs batted in. "But I should be better than a .240 hitter," he said.Part of the problem, according to Fielder, is that he's been using too much of his ample body and not enough of his arms. "[Ben] McDonald is so quick that I think it actually helped me get my hands and arms moving faster," said Fielder.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 22, 1995
LAKELAND, Fla. -- Sparky Anderson will never manage the Detroit Tigers again, and that's the way he wants it.Anderson should be a hero for his refusal to manage replacement players, but as it turns out, he's not a hero at all.He's a man who pocketed $350,000 of his $1.2 million contract, then told his employer to stick it.He's a man who said the Tigers have been run "with phoniness" under owner Mike Ilitch.And he's a man who waited until the last possible moment to bolt, further alienating a front office that no longer was in his corner.
SPORTS
By Bill Madden and Bill Madden,New York Daily News | February 21, 1995
LAKELAND, Fla. -- His bags were packed and Sparky Anderson was leaving on a jet plane for California on Sunday. It had been a short spring -- three days to be exact -- and the 60-year-old dean of major-league managers was going home, probably never to return.It is the price he apparently is willing to pay rather than manage replacement baseball players. But like everything else about this hideous baseball strike, there is as much wrong with Sparky's self-induced exit from the scene as there is right.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
Anybody who's waiting for the New York Yankees to pull an accordion act and fold is in for both a surprise and a long wait. That at least is the opinion of one of the most interested and knowledgeable observers.Sparky Anderson said he doesn't think it's an accident that the team with perhaps the fewest acknowledged stars is leading the toughest division in baseball. And he can sum up the Yankees' early success with one word."Depth," said Anderson, manager of the Detroit Tigers, who are tied with the two-time defending World Series champion Toronto Blue Jays -- but are 10 games behind the Yankees.
SPORTS
By Charlie Vincent and Charlie Vincent,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 9, 1997
Usually, when an athlete writes a book, it is because he wants to remind you of how great he was.Of how the media mistreated him.Of how he overcame dumb managers, bad coaching and crummy luck to become (this is the place for the drum roll) rich and famous and great.Usually, when an athlete writes a book, it is to remind you that he is special and most of us are not.The absence of such self-serving verbiage is what makes Kirk Gibson's book "Bottom of the Ninth" both extraordinary and worth its $35 price tag.Not a whole lot of secrets are revealed in the 161-page coffee table book, written with Detroit sports writer Lynn Henning.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 6, 1992
Reading Time, Two Minutes: Whenever a network executive says, "The fans are the big winners here," as one from ABC did the other day, you immediately call time and begin groping for your wallet.Both touting and playing down its latest venture, ABC, in conjunction with the most powerful college football teams and conferences, is running a pay-per-view package this fall.There will be regional games, anywhere from three to five each Saturday. If what your area is getting over commercial TV doesn't set right, you can order up one of the other games on the menu at a cost of about $10.The one-year experiment seems to be targeting the 3 million alumni the Big Ten has scattered around the country.
SPORTS
By Charlie Vincent and Charlie Vincent,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 9, 1997
Usually, when an athlete writes a book, it is because he wants to remind you of how great he was.Of how the media mistreated him.Of how he overcame dumb managers, bad coaching and crummy luck to become (this is the place for the drum roll) rich and famous and great.Usually, when an athlete writes a book, it is to remind you that he is special and most of us are not.The absence of such self-serving verbiage is what makes Kirk Gibson's book "Bottom of the Ninth" both extraordinary and worth its $35 price tag.Not a whole lot of secrets are revealed in the 161-page coffee table book, written with Detroit sports writer Lynn Henning.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | February 22, 1995
LAKELAND, Fla. -- Sparky Anderson will never manage the Detroit Tigers again, and that's the way he wants it.Anderson should be a hero for his refusal to manage replacement players, but as it turns out, he's not a hero at all.He's a man who pocketed $350,000 of his $1.2 million contract, then told his employer to stick it.He's a man who said the Tigers have been run "with phoniness" under owner Mike Ilitch.And he's a man who waited until the last possible moment to bolt, further alienating a front office that no longer was in his corner.
SPORTS
By Bill Madden and Bill Madden,New York Daily News | February 21, 1995
LAKELAND, Fla. -- His bags were packed and Sparky Anderson was leaving on a jet plane for California on Sunday. It had been a short spring -- three days to be exact -- and the 60-year-old dean of major-league managers was going home, probably never to return.It is the price he apparently is willing to pay rather than manage replacement baseball players. But like everything else about this hideous baseball strike, there is as much wrong with Sparky's self-induced exit from the scene as there is right.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
Anybody who's waiting for the New York Yankees to pull an accordion act and fold is in for both a surprise and a long wait. That at least is the opinion of one of the most interested and knowledgeable observers.Sparky Anderson said he doesn't think it's an accident that the team with perhaps the fewest acknowledged stars is leading the toughest division in baseball. And he can sum up the Yankees' early success with one word."Depth," said Anderson, manager of the Detroit Tigers, who are tied with the two-time defending World Series champion Toronto Blue Jays -- but are 10 games behind the Yankees.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
Chris Hoiles capped an eight-run sixth inning Tuesday night with his third career grand slam, but he said an earlier home run by Leo Gomez was the turning point in the Orioles' 12-9 comeback win over the Tigers."
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | May 6, 1992
Reading Time, Two Minutes: Whenever a network executive says, "The fans are the big winners here," as one from ABC did the other day, you immediately call time and begin groping for your wallet.Both touting and playing down its latest venture, ABC, in conjunction with the most powerful college football teams and conferences, is running a pay-per-view package this fall.There will be regional games, anywhere from three to five each Saturday. If what your area is getting over commercial TV doesn't set right, you can order up one of the other games on the menu at a cost of about $10.The one-year experiment seems to be targeting the 3 million alumni the Big Ten has scattered around the country.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2005
The Atlanta Braves hadn't won a thing in seven years when they installed Bobby Cox as manager 65 games into the 1990 season. They haven't finished a full season out of first place since. So a manager must be pretty important to a baseball franchise, right? Well, consider an alternative example from Orioles history. Earl Weaver was a genius, pretty much any baseball person will tell you. He went through 15 seasons and three generations of talent without guiding a loser and retired after the 1982 Orioles won 94 games.
SPORTS
November 8, 2010
Gift for gab a plus Bill Shaikin Los Angeles Times It would be too simple to say that Anderson won because he lasted, although it is true players knew there would be no point in trying to undermine the manager and get him fired. Anderson had great players, of course, especially in Cincinnati. But his genius was in making players feel good even when they faltered. The clubhouse usually opens to the media 10 minutes after a game, but Anderson would keep his clubhouse closed for 15 or 20 minutes after a tough loss.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Evening Sun Staff | May 23, 1991
DETROIT -- A fastball that sometimes gets up to 95 mph normally wouldn't help a hitter who is struggling, but that might have been the case with Cecil Fielder last night.Not that Fielder is actually struggling. He does have eight home runs and 31 runs batted in. "But I should be better than a .240 hitter," he said.Part of the problem, according to Fielder, is that he's been using too much of his ample body and not enough of his arms. "[Ben] McDonald is so quick that I think it actually helped me get my hands and arms moving faster," said Fielder.
SPORTS
By Jack Morris* ... ... ... ... 162 Saves: Mike Henneman.. ... ... ... .22 * -- no longer with team. 1990 record vs. Orioles: 7-6. Last division title: 1987 Fast facts * The Tigers figure to have 16 players aged 30 or older on their Opening Day roster. * Cecil Fielder and Mickey Tettleton had a combined 548 plate appearances last year without putting the ball in play. * In 1990 games at Tiger Stadium, an average of 9.52 runs were scored, highest in the league. * Sparky Anderson is the only manager to win a World Series in both major leagues. * Alan Trammell and Lou Whitaker are entering their 14th year as a double-play combination, longest streak in history | April 4, 1991
ManagerSparky Anderson (974-860 in 12 seasons with the Tigers; 1,837-1,446 in 21 seasons)1990 record79-83, 3rd place, 9 games behind.1990 offensive leadersBA: Alan Trammell ... ... ... ... .304HR: Cecil Fielder ... ... ... ... ..51RBI: Cecil Fielder... ... ... ... 132SB: Tony Phillips ... ... ... ... ..191990 pitching leadersWins: Jack Morris* ... ... ... ... .15ERA: Edwin Nunez* ... ... ... ...2.24
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.