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NEWS
By Tia Matthews and Tia Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
Upper Fells Point is moving to a Latin beat.Caribbean Sazon offers carryout dishes such as chuletas and arroz habichuela. Caribbean Market has aisles of Latino food products by Goya, Iberia and Vitarroz. And Acapulco Music and Video has more than 20 shelves of videos, including "El Rey del Talon," "El Nino Jesus" and Willie Gonzalez in concert, as well as newspapers from Colombia and Guatemala.Now, Hispanic business owners have organized to search for loans and government funds in the first moves toward creating Spanish Town, a district much like the city's Little Italy.
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2002
Being from southeast Los Angeles, Liz Zacharia said it's hard to find Mexican food in Baltimore like she is used to at home. But at the Fells Point Fun Festival yesterday, she and her boyfriend, Steve Santillan, savored a chicken tamale she said was worthy of the West Coast city. "It's really good," Zacharia said as she put a forkful in her mouth, squinting in the midday sun. Then she looked at the plate and apologized to her boyfriend: "Oh, I'm eating it all." Zacharia, who lives in Bolton Hill, and Santillan, who lives in Little Italy, stopped by the Plaza Hispana on Broadway, a square block of Hispanic culture on display as part of Fells Point's largest outdoor festival.
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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1995
The governor's newly appointed liaison to the Hispanic community yesterday promised to back an attempt by Hispanic business owners to create a specially designated "Spanish Town" in Upper Fells Point.Luis Ortega, who chairs Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Commission on Hispanic Affairs, said he will work "strongly" for the designation."It's necessary. It would give a tremendous support for the businesses there," he said during an interview in his Saratoga Street office. "I am offering my support to them.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
Javier G. Bustamante brims with enthusiasm when he talks about his vision for a section of South Broadway he likes to call Spanish Town, his confidence building with every frame of his PowerPoint presentation. "We are right now in the most important part of town," he said, pointing out the development corridor that runs from Inner Harbor East to Canton, and a few blocks north around Johns Hopkins Hospital. "When you look at us, we're smack in the middle. We definitely want to develop. This is our time."
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
A week after and a block from the Fells Point Festival -- one of the city's most popular street fairs -- the hardscrabble business district unofficially known as Spanish Town will play host to a fair this weekend.The 3rd Annual Festival of Nations -- on South Broadway, from Pratt to Bank streets -- is billed as a celebration of Baltimore's diverse cultures. Organizers also hope to highlight the international flavor of the neighborhood. -- From 11 a.m to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, the smell of roasting papusas -- pancake-like Salvadoran treats stuffed with pork and cheese -- will mingle with spicy Korean barbecue, rotisserie chicken, Indian spices and other treats dished out from the fair's 10 booths.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2001
In Spanish Town, the early afternoons are for business, food and daydreams. Pedro Canderio sits behind the counter in his Latin music store on Broadway, his girlfriend on his lap. On the walls, $7.99 bullfighting and "Last Supper" tapestries hang above racks of Los Gator Bravos and Invencibles CDs. A soap opera plays from a TV in the back. "I look in here and see," he says, "a gorgeous restaurant." There's not a customer in the place. But Don Pedro doesn't seem to mind. In this prime space, Canderio sees a hot Hispanic restaurant.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2002
Javier G. Bustamante brims with enthusiasm when he talks about his vision for a section of South Broadway he likes to call Spanish Town, his confidence building with every frame of his PowerPoint presentation. "We are right now in the most important part of town," he said, pointing out the development corridor that runs from Inner Harbor East to Canton, and a few blocks north around Johns Hopkins Hospital. "When you look at us, we're smack in the middle. We definitely want to develop. This is our time."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2002
Being from southeast Los Angeles, Liz Zacharia said it's hard to find Mexican food in Baltimore like she is used to at home. But at the Fells Point Fun Festival yesterday, she and her boyfriend, Steve Santillan, savored a chicken tamale she said was worthy of the West Coast city. "It's really good," Zacharia said as she put a forkful in her mouth, squinting in the midday sun. Then she looked at the plate and apologized to her boyfriend: "Oh, I'm eating it all." Zacharia, who lives in Bolton Hill, and Santillan, who lives in Little Italy, stopped by the Plaza Hispana on Broadway, a square block of Hispanic culture on display as part of Fells Point's largest outdoor festival.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
An association of the city's Hispanic entrepreneurs -- formed last year to create the kind of network that helped earlier waves of immigrant-owned businesses -- is ineffective and increasingly divided over how to help struggling merchants, members say.The rift in the Hispanic Business Association stems from deep differences in the city's growing Hispanic population -- estimated to be between 20,000 and 30,000 -- over how to win government help in the upper...
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | April 14, 1992
In a little Spanish townWas on a night like this . . . THE OWNERS of the abandoned Southern Hotel at Light and Redwood streets say it's a hazard. They want to tear it down and use the space for a city park until the economy improves and they can build a $180 million office tower.Preservationists beg to differ about razing the Southern, but it's not to enter the argument to suggest that if a park were established at the site, Baltimoreans of a certain age could sit on a bench and hear Spanish music from above.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2001
In Spanish Town, the early afternoons are for business, food and daydreams. Pedro Canderio sits behind the counter in his Latin music store on Broadway, his girlfriend on his lap. On the walls, $7.99 bullfighting and "Last Supper" tapestries hang above racks of Los Gator Bravos and Invencibles CDs. A soap opera plays from a TV in the back. "I look in here and see," he says, "a gorgeous restaurant." There's not a customer in the place. But Don Pedro doesn't seem to mind. In this prime space, Canderio sees a hot Hispanic restaurant.
NEWS
By Kurt Streeter and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1999
A week after and a block from the Fells Point Festival -- one of the city's most popular street fairs -- the hardscrabble business district unofficially known as Spanish Town will play host to a fair this weekend.The 3rd Annual Festival of Nations -- on South Broadway, from Pratt to Bank streets -- is billed as a celebration of Baltimore's diverse cultures. Organizers also hope to highlight the international flavor of the neighborhood. -- From 11 a.m to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, the smell of roasting papusas -- pancake-like Salvadoran treats stuffed with pork and cheese -- will mingle with spicy Korean barbecue, rotisserie chicken, Indian spices and other treats dished out from the fair's 10 booths.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
An association of the city's Hispanic entrepreneurs -- formed last year to create the kind of network that helped earlier waves of immigrant-owned businesses -- is ineffective and increasingly divided over how to help struggling merchants, members say.The rift in the Hispanic Business Association stems from deep differences in the city's growing Hispanic population -- estimated to be between 20,000 and 30,000 -- over how to win government help in the upper...
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1995
The governor's newly appointed liaison to the Hispanic community yesterday promised to back an attempt by Hispanic business owners to create a specially designated "Spanish Town" in Upper Fells Point.Luis Ortega, who chairs Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Commission on Hispanic Affairs, said he will work "strongly" for the designation."It's necessary. It would give a tremendous support for the businesses there," he said during an interview in his Saratoga Street office. "I am offering my support to them.
NEWS
By Tia Matthews and Tia Matthews,Sun Staff Writer | April 5, 1995
Upper Fells Point is moving to a Latin beat.Caribbean Sazon offers carryout dishes such as chuletas and arroz habichuela. Caribbean Market has aisles of Latino food products by Goya, Iberia and Vitarroz. And Acapulco Music and Video has more than 20 shelves of videos, including "El Rey del Talon," "El Nino Jesus" and Willie Gonzalez in concert, as well as newspapers from Colombia and Guatemala.Now, Hispanic business owners have organized to search for loans and government funds in the first moves toward creating Spanish Town, a district much like the city's Little Italy.
NEWS
March 19, 2004
IN BALTIMORE'S Spanish Town, Latino immigrants crowd into makeshift apartments to live cheaply while working in low-wage day labor jobs. Mostly men who are here alone, they care more about sending money home to their families south of the border than their living conditions. For too long, the situation has been ignored. We can no longer look the other way: A fatal fire in an overcrowded rowhouse on East Baltimore Street shows why. Two Latino men died in the Feb. 20 blaze. The casualties could have been greater: Nine other Latino men lived there, and some escaped by jumping from a building cornice.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 5, 1999
In a scene from Vicki Baum's potboiler novel "Grand Hotel" played out in the 1932 MGM classic film of the same name, actor Lewis Stone looks out over the crowded hotel lobby filled with the comings and goings of Greta Garbo, John and Lionel Barrymore, Joan Crawford and Jean Hersholt and wryly mutters, "Grand Hotel ... people come ... people go ... nothing ever happens." Unlike the fictional Grand Hotel, something is sure to happen soon at Baltimore's Southern Hotel, the long-shuttered 14-story "Queen of Light Street" that opened for business in 1918 and closed its doors in 1964.
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