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Spanish Mackerel

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By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
On Sunday, with fall fishing patterns firming up on Chesapeake Bay, Tom Haller of Lusby caught a big piece of late summer action off Randall Cliffs -- a state-record Spanish mackerel.For the most part, Spanish mackerel move out of Maryland's bay waters in early to mid September, as water temperatures begin to drop.According to a catch report filed with the Department of Natural Resources, Haller was fishing aboard Capt. Charlie Marenka's charterboat, Jennifer Anne, trolling parachutes and large bucktails off the western shore for big rockfish.
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By CANDUS THOMSON | October 6, 2002
George Hemlet started catching fish with a cane pole when he was just a little lad. That itty-bitty pole wouldn't have helped him much on Wednesday, when the 70-year-old retired machinist from Bel Air caught a Spanish mackerel that broke the state record. Hemlet and six friends were chumming for rockfish aboard Capt. Frank Carver's Loosen Up, out of Deale. It took them just 45 minutes to reach their limit, so they turned their attention to other targets. They landed 50 blues and 39 Spanish mackerel and were idling by Buoy 83 when lightning struck.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | October 6, 2002
George Hemlet started catching fish with a cane pole when he was just a little lad. That itty-bitty pole wouldn't have helped him much on Wednesday, when the 70-year-old retired machinist from Bel Air caught a Spanish mackerel that broke the state record. Hemlet and six friends were chumming for rockfish aboard Capt. Frank Carver's Loosen Up, out of Deale. It took them just 45 minutes to reach their limit, so they turned their attention to other targets. They landed 50 blues and 39 Spanish mackerel and were idling by Buoy 83 when lightning struck.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1999
On Sunday, with fall fishing patterns firming up on Chesapeake Bay, Tom Haller of Lusby caught a big piece of late summer action off Randall Cliffs -- a state-record Spanish mackerel.For the most part, Spanish mackerel move out of Maryland's bay waters in early to mid September, as water temperatures begin to drop.According to a catch report filed with the Department of Natural Resources, Haller was fishing aboard Capt. Charlie Marenka's charterboat, Jennifer Anne, trolling parachutes and large bucktails off the western shore for big rockfish.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1999
Among the most pleasant surprises Chesapeake Bay anglers might encounter at this time of year is a good run of Spanish mackerel, a long, thin fish that mixes with schools of blues and rock and hits lures with abandon.Buddy Fuller of Mechanicsville got the best possible surprise on Aug. 16 -- an 8.45-pound Spanish mackerel that set a state record.Fuller, 17, was fishing southwest of the Target Ship aboard the Lisa S when the 32.5-inch fish hit a small, gold Huntington Drone spoon.The Lisa S is based at Scheible's Fishing Center in Ridge, and that day's charter party was trolling the edges of mixed schools of mackerel, bluefish and rockfish.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | August 7, 1994
Terns and gulls were screeching, whirling, diving. Here and there baitfish cleared the surface of this small portion of Chesapeake Bay, chased upward by hundreds -- perhaps thousands -- of larger fish feeding heavily.And Jim Phillips was laughing."D'you see that?" Phillips said, balancing against the starboard gunwale. "I had just taken my fly from the water and a striper came two feet out of the water after it. Too bad it missed. That would have really been something."As it was, the previous 30 minutes or so already had been something special.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | September 5, 1993
Some of the best saltwater fishing news of the year is that Spanish mackerel have invaded the Chesapeake again this year.These tasty, tough-hitting fish began turning up in the lower Bay areas about two weeks ago and the middle Bay a week later.At the last minute I had to cancel a lower Bay trip with Captain Eddie Davis a couple of weeks ago and missed out on some sizzling mackerel and bluefish action. I rescheduled for last Saturday and made up for lost time.Joining me aboard Davis' Edith Rose were Tommy Cordy, Dave Barnes, Jenny Greene and Erin Croke of Pasadena plus southern Carroll County anglers Timmy and Clarence Newberry.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The Department of Natural Resources yesterday submitted its final proposals for waterfowl seasons to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, including a 60-day duck season with five-duck bag limit. Duck hunters will be allowed to take one additional teal during duck season, bringing the total bag to six. The USFWS has allowed Maryland to extend the snow goose season to 107 days, with the last of three splits ending March 10. Split dates for snow geese are Oct. 16-Nov. 26, Dec. 6-Jan.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | August 30, 1991
Fishing is great, but it took twice as many calls as usual to find that information.Many of us did not fish last weekend, and it becomes difficult determining fishing activity if no one is fishing. Fortunately, I was able to run down enough captains to keep me straight.Actually, fishing is very good right now. In some areas the bluefish are not behaving properly, but overall the fishing is good.The upper bay might have the best and most reliable bluefish activity throughout much of the Chesapeake.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 5, 1993
A couple of hundred yards to the northeast, a quartet of small gulls could be seen working the bay surface, scouting the movements of fish below, waiting for the tracks of the predators to cross those of the prey.In this case, the prey were bluefish and Spanish mackerel mixed in a small school traveling less than 10 feet from the surface.While the birds tracked the movements from above, the charter boat tracked from behind, working west to east toward False Channel, below the mouth of the Choptank River.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | September 2, 1999
The Department of Natural Resources yesterday submitted its final proposals for waterfowl seasons to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, including a 60-day duck season with five-duck bag limit. Duck hunters will be allowed to take one additional teal during duck season, bringing the total bag to six. The USFWS has allowed Maryland to extend the snow goose season to 107 days, with the last of three splits ending March 10. Split dates for snow geese are Oct. 16-Nov. 26, Dec. 6-Jan.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1999
Among the most pleasant surprises Chesapeake Bay anglers might encounter at this time of year is a good run of Spanish mackerel, a long, thin fish that mixes with schools of blues and rock and hits lures with abandon.Buddy Fuller of Mechanicsville got the best possible surprise on Aug. 16 -- an 8.45-pound Spanish mackerel that set a state record.Fuller, 17, was fishing southwest of the Target Ship aboard the Lisa S when the 32.5-inch fish hit a small, gold Huntington Drone spoon.The Lisa S is based at Scheible's Fishing Center in Ridge, and that day's charter party was trolling the edges of mixed schools of mackerel, bluefish and rockfish.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 3, 1995
Fall rockfish season opened Friday, the earliest late-season period for striper fishing for recreational and charterboat anglers since the fishery was closed for five years starting in January of 1985. And according to several accounts, opening day was somewhere between a bang and a whimper."I don't think it was nothing to be excited about, much more than what you see any other day," said Bunky Conner of Bunky's Charterboats in Solomons. "There's been quite a few guys through here with their limits, but I haven't seen any real big fish."
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | August 7, 1994
Terns and gulls were screeching, whirling, diving. Here and there baitfish cleared the surface of this small portion of Chesapeake Bay, chased upward by hundreds -- perhaps thousands -- of larger fish feeding heavily.And Jim Phillips was laughing."D'you see that?" Phillips said, balancing against the starboard gunwale. "I had just taken my fly from the water and a striper came two feet out of the water after it. Too bad it missed. That would have really been something."As it was, the previous 30 minutes or so already had been something special.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 16, 1993
ROCKFISH VIDEOThe traditional method of catching rockfish is trolling with heavy sinkers, wire line and fairly deep-running spoons and bucktails or drift fishing with live eels or peeler crab baits.A couple of avid largemouth bass fishermen -- Gene Mueller and Bob Denyer -- would like to interest fishermen in a different approach -- casting for stripers with spinning, bait casting or fly tackle.Mueller, outdoors editor of The Washington Times, and Denyer, a top guide with Life Outdoors Unlimited, have put together a video tape called River Rockfish, which explains where, when and how to try this different twist in striper fishing.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 9, 1993
COASTAL STRIPERSRockfish anglers in Maryland's coastal waters apparently could get a jump on the fishing season this fall if regulations proposed by the Department of Natural Resources are approved by the state legislature.Under the DNR proposals, the coastal season would be from July 15 to Nov. 30 for recreational fishermen, with a minimum size of 28 inches and no maximum length. The creel limit would be one fish per person per day.The season for recreational fishermen and charter boat fishermen in the Chesapeake Bay would not open until Oct. 1.A decision by the legislature is expected by Tuesday, and according to DNR's fisheries division, coastal fishermen would be able to start fishing immediately.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | August 9, 1991
Fishing continues to be outstanding in the lower and upper bay and medium to outstanding in the middle bay.The Solomon's area is rolling in fish. Bluefish are everywhere, and Spanish mackerel are comingon strong. Ken Lamb of the Tackle Box in Lexington Park reports thatsome trollers have caught as many as 100 mackerel. These ocean fish are averaging 2 1/2 pounds, with some going to 5 pounds.Norfolk spot are plentiful in the Patuxent and a few legal croaker (hardhead) have been caught at the mouth of the Patuxent.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | September 13, 1991
**** EXCELLENT*** GOOD** FAIR* POORSalt waterOCEANInshore **** -- Flounder fishing remains good in the back bays on shiners and minnows. In the surf at North Ocean City and Assateague, the action has been increasing, with small bluefish, spot, flounder, kingfish and an occasional pompano. Night fishing at the Ocean City inlet has turned up sea trout in the 7-pound range.Offshore *** -- Blue and white marlin still are being taken at the Washington and Baltimore canyons, and dolphin have been active at the 30 fathom break inside Poor Man's Canyon.
SPORTS
By LONNY WEAVER | September 5, 1993
Some of the best saltwater fishing news of the year is that Spanish mackerel have invaded the Chesapeake again this year.These tasty, tough-hitting fish began turning up in the lower Bay areas about two weeks ago and the middle Bay a week later.At the last minute I had to cancel a lower Bay trip with Captain Eddie Davis a couple of weeks ago and missed out on some sizzling mackerel and bluefish action. I rescheduled for last Saturday and made up for lost time.Joining me aboard Davis' Edith Rose were Tommy Cordy, Dave Barnes, Jenny Greene and Erin Croke of Pasadena plus southern Carroll County anglers Timmy and Clarence Newberry.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | September 5, 1993
A couple of hundred yards to the northeast, a quartet of small gulls could be seen working the bay surface, scouting the movements of fish below, waiting for the tracks of the predators to cross those of the prey.In this case, the prey were bluefish and Spanish mackerel mixed in a small school traveling less than 10 feet from the surface.While the birds tracked the movements from above, the charter boat tracked from behind, working west to east toward False Channel, below the mouth of the Choptank River.
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