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TRAVEL
By Mercury News | August 5, 2007
How can I find out about tours of Washington, D.C., that are conducted in Spanish? We couldn't find operators or companies that provide regularly scheduled Spanish-speaking group tours of Washington. However, WashingTours and Events (wash ingtours.net), which is owned and operated by Maricar Donato, offers private tours of the city in Spanish and several other languages. She handles primarily large groups but can also accommodate small parties. Donato charges $65 an hour, regardless of the size of the group, but you must provide the car, and her tours are a minimum of four hours.
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NEWS
By Kaitlin Thomas | April 24, 2014
On a recent trip to San Antonio, Texas, I was struck by a realization: Spanish is no longer merely a foreign language; it has officially become a domestic one. Ordering a coffee at Starbucks, having a drink with colleagues at a local restaurant, asking a stranger on the street for directions - all of these are scenarios that would have once, in the not-so-distant past, necessitated an unspoken adherence to a "speak in English" public standard....
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NEWS
By Kaitlin Thomas | April 24, 2014
On a recent trip to San Antonio, Texas, I was struck by a realization: Spanish is no longer merely a foreign language; it has officially become a domestic one. Ordering a coffee at Starbucks, having a drink with colleagues at a local restaurant, asking a stranger on the street for directions - all of these are scenarios that would have once, in the not-so-distant past, necessitated an unspoken adherence to a "speak in English" public standard....
NEWS
By Tony Glaros | April 8, 2014
Inside the hushed contours of the racetrack kitchen, deep in the cloistered, hardscrabble world of the backstretch at Laurel Park racetrack, every head was bowed. The Rev. Segundo Mir, who pastors a mostly Spanish-speaking flock at First Baptist Church of Laurel, led the 14 people in the room in prayer. "Thank you, Lord, for this beautiful day, the blue sky," he began in a honey-thick baritone. The Monday evening assembly is a long tradition, a standing invitation for anyone who works at the track and is moved to attend.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2005
Hector Pastrama feels like he spends more time in his car than he does at home -- which can be torture without the right tunes. But last month, his trips across Maryland and Delaware taking supply orders from Hispanic-owned groceries became considerably more tolerable when 99.1 WHFS-FM ditched its alternative rock format to become "El Zol," the region's newest, most powerful Spanish-language radio station. "It gets me to the last toll," said Pastrama, referring to the toll plaza on Interstate 95 just north of the Susquehanna River.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 23, 2000
On bent knee, his arm outstretched, Mark Hiteshew proposed to a beautiful cockroach this week as part of an inaugural foreign-language summer camp sponsored by the Baltimore County school system. Mark, 13, and 29 other middle and high school students paid $100 each to polish their Spanish language skills during a weeklong camp at the Essex campus of the Community College of Baltimore County. Mark, a pupil at Catonsville Middle School, dropped to his knee for his role in a fanciful production of "La Cucarachita Bonita," a fable that the students will present in Spanish to their parents today, the last day of the language camp.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | August 14, 2003
Comcast yesterday added 18 Spanish-language channels to its digital cable television lineups in cities and counties throughout the state. Viewers with digital cable can now view the channels in Baltimore City, Annapolis and Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Calvert, Howard and Harford counties. While the channels can be viewed at no cost through Aug. 31 by those Comcast customers who subscribe to digital service, the monthly fee to continue receiving the Spanish-language channels will be $9.95 starting next month.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
"Durante mi vida y todos mis viajes, siempre recordare que el espaM-qol es la lengua mejor." That's the way Loch Raven High School senior Michael Hackett feels about the Spanish language. For those unfamiliar with the Romance language of Spain and of Central and South America, Hackett says it's the best. He's not alone. Student enrollment in Spanish language classes in Baltimore County has challenged teacher hiring recently, and forced the Board of Education to consider spending $470,000 on new textbooks.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2004
The killings of three children last week in a Park Heights apartment were at the front of many parishioners' minds yesterday as they walked into what is considered the mother of Baltimore's Hispanic churches. It didn't matter that the families of Alexis Espejo Quezada, 10, Lucero Solis Quezada, 9, and Ricardo A. Quezada Jr., 9, did not attend St. Michael the Archangel Roman Catholic Church, at Wolfe and Lombard streets, or its nearby sister church, St. Patrick. It didn't matter that most parishioners - a combination of immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador and elsewhere, along with some longtime residents - didn't know the children personally.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 1998
I am a Spanish teacher interested in studying in Spain with my 9-year-old son. Do you know of programs that can accommodate both parent and child?Spanish-language programs for travelers are easy to find in most of Spain's large cities; finding classes for both adults and young children, however, is a difficult proposition. (The tourist office on Madrid's Plaza Mayor could not readily name one such school in Madrid, which, with its high prices and traffic jams, you might want to avoid anyway)
NEWS
By Daniel Garza | February 10, 2014
Much like its English language counterpart, the White House's Spanish-language health care website, CuidadoDeSalud.gov, has been filled with technical issues, mistranslations and links to English-only pages and forms since its launch. It's a laughing stock, but the joke is on Hispanics and Latinos like myself. Beyond the faulty launch of the federal website, the Affordable Care Act penalizes the Hispanic-American community in Maryland in several serious ways. The end result that a law that was supposed to help us actually makes affordable and quality health care even harder to find.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2013
There was lots of mail on the Fox telecast of the Ravens' epic win Sunday over the Vikings. In the interest of getting more reader reaction into this post, I'll keep my words to a minimum. I'll try anyway. I've noticed the "Z responds" part is sometimes longer than that to which I am responding. What can I say? Let's start with Kitty, who writes: Dear Z, I thoroughly enjoy your column in the Sun.  I must comment on the last 4 paragraphs of your column today (12/9/13).  I am a FiOS customer and was totally frustrated by the audio of Sunday's game.  As you described, I heard no sound, then English, Spanish, English, etc. for the entire 1st half.   I thought something was wrong with my TV.   You seem to have enjoyed Fox's coverage, but a graphic on the screen explaining the audio difficulties would have been greatly appreciated.  I listened to WBAL , which was difficult as they are a few minutes ahead of the video.  I would have loved to have heard from Hale, Myers, and Ryan on the broadcasting team, but I COULDN'T UNDERSTAND anything being said!
NEWS
March 7, 2010
A Spanish-speaking operator will answer calls to the Aprenda a Vivir Spanish Language Line of the Anne Arundel County Health Department at 410-222-4479, 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays and Thursdays. Callers can leave messages at other times. Information about community health services and free Spanish-language informational materials are available.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2001
"Durante mi vida y todos mis viajes, siempre recordare que el espanol es la lengua mejor." That's the way Loch Raven High School senior Michael Hackett feels about the Spanish language. For those unfamiliar with the Romance language of Spain and of Central and South America, Hackett says it's the best. He's not alone. Student enrollment in Spanish language classes in Baltimore County has challenged teacher hiring recently, and forced the Board of Education to consider spending $470,000 on new textbooks.
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