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Spanish American War

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By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Writer | September 19, 1994
Ever since the United States declared its hegemony in the Americas with the Monroe Doctrine in 1823, its policy toward the nations of the Caribbean has lacked two things: consistency and variety.That is only one of its problems.Another, according to many with experience in the region, is that this policy is often built on ignorance."We don't know much about these countries," said Lawrence Pezzullo, President Clinton's former special envoy to Haiti.Mr. Pezzullo explained that because U.S. policy has been so Europe-directed since the end of World War II, "once you get out of the Atlantic corridor the ignorance is profound.
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NEWS
June 3, 2014
Dan Bongino suggests that newspapers need to change to make money ( "Bongino: Sun's left-wing views show why print media are becoming irrelevant," May 31). He's right, yellow journalism makes money. But he's wrong, yellow journalism is not new. In 1898 William Randolph Hearst, owner of the New York Journal used yellow journalism to get America involved in a war with Spain. In the Spanish-American War, people died and Mr. Hearst made lots of money. Was it worth it? In 2014, the Koch brothers use the tea party and Fox News in the same manner.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1997
Nothing is more bully than war, "Rough Riders" would have us believe, and no man was ever more bully than Theodore Roosevelt. His mythic charge up Cuba's San Juan Hill is rousingly dramatized in TNT's four-hour miniseries, which, unfortunately, overstays its welcome by at least a third.This dream project for writer-director John Milius ("Red Dawn," "Conan the Barbarian"), for whom macho has provided a way of life and a paycheck, so oozes with testosterone that your TV screen may start sprouting facial hair.
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
If you have not yet read Luke O'Neil's "The Year We Broke the Internet" at Esquire , let me quote a couple of salient passages:  This, he says, is how online sites operate: " Give me the viral pictures, and I'll give you the truth. And then, after an appropriate waiting period, I'll give you the  other  truth, and capitalize on that traffic too. It's almost a perfect callback to William Randolph Hearst's infamous declaration on the eve of the Spanish-American War, “You furnish the pictures and I'll furnish the war.” Even more fitting, historians don't think he ever said anything like that.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
The United States military overwhelms an outmatched opponent, easily taking the capital city of a country half a world away. Mission accomplished, or so it seems. Actually, it was the beginning of a protracted guerrilla war, years of bloody fighting that led to allegations of brutality on the battlefield and widespread protests and political controversy at home. It is not Iraq that Johns Hopkins University historian Paul Kramer is writing about; it is the Philippines. His newly published book The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines tells the story of a war fought as the 19th century turned into the 20th that is largely left out of the history books.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 21, 1998
One hundred years ago, Sgt. Augustus Walley was in Cuba and the Philippines, fighting in the Spanish-American War. A member of the all-black Buffalo Soldiers cavalry unit, he fought alongside Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders at Kettle Hill and San Juan Heights.Yesterday, the memory of the Reisterstown native was honored with the unveiling of a memorial plaque at the intersection of Route 140 and Cockeys Mills Road in Reisterstown.For Houston Wedlock, a retired Army sergeant and Buffalo Soldier re-enactor, the memorial represents long-overdue recognition for Walley, who also received two Medals of Honor.
NEWS
June 3, 2014
Dan Bongino suggests that newspapers need to change to make money ( "Bongino: Sun's left-wing views show why print media are becoming irrelevant," May 31). He's right, yellow journalism makes money. But he's wrong, yellow journalism is not new. In 1898 William Randolph Hearst, owner of the New York Journal used yellow journalism to get America involved in a war with Spain. In the Spanish-American War, people died and Mr. Hearst made lots of money. Was it worth it? In 2014, the Koch brothers use the tea party and Fox News in the same manner.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen | November 29, 1992
A SHIP TO REMEMBER:THE MAINE AND THESPANISH-AMERICAN WAR.Michael Blow.William Morrow.` 496 pages. $27.50."In my opinion," wrote Charles Dwight Sigsbee, captain of the battleship Maine, "the arrival of the Maine has caused the United States Government to dominate the situation. It has reduced to absurdity the warnings and threats published from Spanish sources previous to the arrival of the vessel."They would prove to be prophetic words.The Maine had been ordered to Havana in January 1898 by President William McKinley following Cuban riots earlier that month.
NEWS
By Andrew G. Sherwood and Andrew G. Sherwood,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Baltimore County historian Louis Diggs reminisced about his Army service during the Korean War era in a discussion yesterday at the Pikesville library about Maryland's first African-American National Guard unit. The presentation was part of the Friends of the Library program designed to open the library to speakers and the community. Diggs said he joined the Maryland National Guard five days before the Korean War broke out in 1950, when he signed up for the 726th Transportation Truck Company of the all-African-American 231st Transportation Truck Battalion.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | August 28, 1997
OYSTER BAY, N.Y. -- Nearly a hundred years after the last shots were fired, admirers of Theodore Roosevelt are gearing up to fight a new battle of San Juan Hill.If they win, Roosevelt will finally get the Medal of Honor he was denied after his Rough Riders helped capture the Cuban hill and turned the volunteer officer into a national hero.Roosevelt's commanding officers nominated him for the nation's highest military honor soon after the Spanish-American War, but the Army balked. Some say it was because his gallantry wasn't extraordinary enough.
NEWS
September 5, 2013
Thanks to The Sun I now know what it may have been to read the paper in 1898 prior to the Spanish American War ("Punishing Syria," Aug. 27). Your editorial was all that yellow journalism could be, waving the bloody flag, citing massacres that no one could actually attribute to any one side with assurance. We have a president who states that crossing a red line will have serious consequences and then retreats like Hamlet to think on those consequences and issue more rhetoric. Secretary of State John Kerry comes forth twice to cite an unspecified intelligence report that is certain proof of the guilt of the Syrian regime and that we will form a coalition to deliver consequences to the guilty, even though we really don't know who they are. And the supposed members of the coalition have one by one opted out, so we are left with a coalition of one. And we are told by our media, fully subservient to our would-be Caesar, that we must teach them a lesson, we must throw some bombs or missiles at the Syrian regime as punishment for their terrible crimes against their own people.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | August 8, 2013
They're back! The isolationist poltergeists that forever haunt the Republican Party. Or so we're told. In July, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky had a set-to over American foreign policy. Mr. Christie clumsily denounced "this strain of libertarianism that's going through parties right now and making big headlines I think is a very dangerous thought. " It was clumsy in its garbled syntax but also in its ill-considered shot at "libertarianism. " What he meant to say, I think, was "isolationist," and that is the term a host of commentators on the left and right are using to describe Mr. Paul and his ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 14, 2012
Heavy Seas Alehouse is scheduled to open officially on Wednesday, taking over the Tack Factory space formerly occupied by Tsunami and Diablita. The key word is "officially. " The new restaurant, the first to carry the name of the popular Baltimore-based beer brand, opened its doors quietly on Feb. 7, a week ahead of its announced opening. But word got out. A day after its stealth opening, the restaurant was nicely filled. The bar was fully occupied, as were many of the bar area's tables, which include two long, community-style high tables.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2011
In a recent obituary, I mauled the spelling of a ship's name, the USS Reina Mercedes, which was a three-masted Spanish-American War prize that dated to 1887 and had been a fixture on the Naval Academy waterfront for decades. It wasn't long before my inbox was swimming with emails regarding my mistake, and a few old salts even put pen to paper to let me know I had it wrong. A number of academy graduates pointed out the error of my ways, and they were joined by Jeff Landaw , an eagle-eyed veteran Baltimore Sun copy editor and longtime colleague, who saw it after it was too late to spare me professional embarrassment.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
It took America less than 100 days to start and finish the Spanish-American War. Americans have been paying for that "splendid little war" ever since. That line on your wireless and landline phone bills that says "federal excise tax" started as a toll on phone calls by wealthy Americans to pay for the war. The war ended quickly, 108 years ago. But the temporary tax did not, growing over time to net more than the wealthy as telephones became ubiquitous. Yesterday, however, U.S. Treasury Secretary John W. Snow said the government will finally abolish the "outdated, antiquated tax that has survived a century beyond its original purpose, and by now should have been ancient history."
NEWS
May 17, 2006
Well-reasoned plan for border control I believe that Monday's address was the finest speech of President Bush's entire career, and I salute him for seeking a reasoned approach - a rational ground on which all interested parties can and should stand ("Bush pledges `secure, orderly, fair' system," May 16). Indeed, I plan on framing this speech for my office wall. That said, I would add that we cannot and should not permit citizens' groups such as the Minutemen to police our frontiers. That is the job of the U.S. Army, not the National Guard, whose forces should remain at the command of their home states' governors for floods, riot control and other such immediate response actions.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTER | May 26, 2006
It took America less than 100 days to start and finish the Spanish-American War. Americans have been paying for that "splendid little war" ever since. That line on your wireless and landline phone bills that says "federal excise tax" started as a toll on phone calls by wealthy Americans to pay for the war. The war ended quickly, 108 years ago. But the temporary tax did not, growing over time to net more than the wealthy as telephones became ubiquitous. Yesterday, however, U.S. Treasury Secretary John W. Snow said the government will finally abolish the "outdated, antiquated tax that has survived a century beyond its original purpose, and by now should have been ancient history."
NEWS
May 26, 1997
FOR 22 YEARS, a period longer than the time between the end of World War I and the beginning of World War II, the United States has been blessedly free of conflict that inflicts death, injury and heartbreak in numbing numbers. For that, the nation should be thankful on this Memorial Day.Total estimated U.S. casualty figures tell the story: Revolutionary War, 10,623; War of 1812, 6,765; Mexican War, 17,436; Civil War, 780,013; Spanish-American War, 4,108; World War I, 320,710; World War II, 1,076,162; Korean War, 136,935; Vietnam War, 211,471; Persian Gulf War, 760.Since then, in major military actions, the U.S. has suffered 30 combat deaths in Somalia and none in Bosnia, the former a humanitarian effort that turned sour and the latter a peace-keeping operation that has left American forces relatively unharmed.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | April 16, 2006
The United States military overwhelms an outmatched opponent, easily taking the capital city of a country half a world away. Mission accomplished, or so it seems. Actually, it was the beginning of a protracted guerrilla war, years of bloody fighting that led to allegations of brutality on the battlefield and widespread protests and political controversy at home. It is not Iraq that Johns Hopkins University historian Paul Kramer is writing about; it is the Philippines. His newly published book The Blood of Government: Race, Empire, the United States and the Philippines tells the story of a war fought as the 19th century turned into the 20th that is largely left out of the history books.
NEWS
By Andrew G. Sherwood and Andrew G. Sherwood,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Baltimore County historian Louis Diggs reminisced about his Army service during the Korean War era in a discussion yesterday at the Pikesville library about Maryland's first African-American National Guard unit. The presentation was part of the Friends of the Library program designed to open the library to speakers and the community. Diggs said he joined the Maryland National Guard five days before the Korean War broke out in 1950, when he signed up for the 726th Transportation Truck Company of the all-African-American 231st Transportation Truck Battalion.
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