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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2004
By all accounts, Bob Morse is a solid citizen who runs a small wedding video and Web design business in northern California. So why did he send an e-mail peddling hard-core Russian pornography to Francis Uy at the Johns Hopkins University? The short answer: He didn't know he'd done it. For Uy, who works at Hopkins' Center for Talented Youth, the Russian porn offer was just one of 77 junk messages that landed in his home and office inboxes that day. From all that garbage, he had to fish out 16 e-mails that were actually for him. Both men were victims of an assault that has turned the Internet into a war zone - a contest of wills between spammers and those who would stop them.
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BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | September 13, 2007
When I returned from an extended vacation, I was "rewarded" with more than 400 e-mails. I noted that there were 90 e-mails in my outbox. This seemed odd, seeing that I had just turned my computer on. I opened the outbox just in time to see a number of e-mails queued up for sending. I tried to delete the bunch but was only able to stop a few before the outbox automatically emptied. Interestingly, the e-mails in question were not in my sent-box. This same phenomenon has happened several times since I first noticed it. It probably is a routine occurrence, but it went unnoticed previously.
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BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | September 13, 2007
When I returned from an extended vacation, I was "rewarded" with more than 400 e-mails. I noted that there were 90 e-mails in my outbox. This seemed odd, seeing that I had just turned my computer on. I opened the outbox just in time to see a number of e-mails queued up for sending. I tried to delete the bunch but was only able to stop a few before the outbox automatically emptied. Interestingly, the e-mails in question were not in my sent-box. This same phenomenon has happened several times since I first noticed it. It probably is a routine occurrence, but it went unnoticed previously.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2005
ATLANTA - EarthLink Inc., the fourth-largest U.S. Internet service provider, said yesterday that two Florida men it sued have agreed to stop sending customers unwanted e-mail. EarthLink said Damon DeCrescenzo and David Burstyn, two of 16 defendants in the company's lawsuit filed in Atlanta last year, agreed not to send unsolicited commercial e-mail and to pay an undisclosed settlement. Spokeswoman Carla Shaw said the suit against the other defendants will go on. EarthLink last year sued a group of individuals and companies it called the "Alabama Spammers" last year, accusing them of sending more than 250 million pieces of illegal commercial e-mail, or "spam," to promote herbal supplements and impotence drugs.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | January 26, 2005
ATLANTA - EarthLink Inc., the fourth-largest U.S. Internet service provider, said yesterday that two Florida men it sued have agreed to stop sending customers unwanted e-mail. EarthLink said Damon DeCrescenzo and David Burstyn, two of 16 defendants in the company's lawsuit filed in Atlanta last year, agreed not to send unsolicited commercial e-mail and to pay an undisclosed settlement. Spokeswoman Carla Shaw said the suit against the other defendants will go on. EarthLink last year sued a group of individuals and companies it called the "Alabama Spammers" last year, accusing them of sending more than 250 million pieces of illegal commercial e-mail, or "spam," to promote herbal supplements and impotence drugs.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 2004
NEW YORK - Time Warner Inc.'s America Online unit, Microsoft Corp., EarthLink Inc. and Yahoo Inc. - the four largest U.S. Internet mail providers - sued dozens of junk e-mail senders yesterday in a second wave of lawsuits under a new U.S. law designed to curb spam. The six lawsuits, filed in California, Georgia and Washington state, target senders of unwanted commercial e-mail peddling pornography, prescription pills, cheap mortgages and other products, the companies said in statements.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
A man described as one of the world's most prolific spam distributors was arrested yesterday in Raleigh, N.C., and charged with four felony counts under Virginia's new anti-spam law in a case that experts say reflects the nation's growing frustration with annoying junk e-mail. Jeremy Jaynes, 29, who authorities say also goes by the names of Jeremy James and Gaven Stubberfield, is accused by Virginia prosecutors of flooding computer users with more than 100,000 unsolicited bulk e-mails over a monthlong period this summer and deceptively hiding his identity so that users could not trace his Internet address.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 29, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- America Online Inc., the No. 1 online service, filed another lawsuit yesterday to stop its customers from being flooded with millions of unsolicited pieces of "junk" e-mail.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Diego against Michael Persaud, claims that he committed fraud by using various names to send millions of e-mail messages to America Online customers. Those messages solicit money in exchange for a directory of companies that offer home employment.The lawsuit is one of nine filed by AOL in five states against people who send out "spam," a term for unwanted electronic mail.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Last summer, when Del. Brian J. Feldman's campaign e-mail account was hijacked by a spammer who used it to send ads for a pornographic Web site, he was flooded with replies. "Some said, `I'm interested, but I want more information,' " recalled Feldman, a Montgomery County Democrat. "Some said, `Please remove me from your distribution list.' And some - the people from my district who knew me - said, `Have you gone crazy?' " Feldman had not gone crazy. He was another victim of the computer worms that have put countless e-mail accounts at the service of spammers whose junk e-mail is driving computer users crazier every day. His experience - which he described as "a potential catastrophe for a political career" - gave an extra push to a bill the General Assembly enacted Monday night in the frantic closing hours of the session.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Tatum and Christine Tatum,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 19, 2003
CHICAGO - Spam-fighters are pushing a new way to stop junk e-mail that mirrors the "do not call" lists aimed at curbing telemarketers' annoying phone solicitations. Sen. Charles E. Schumer, a New York Democrat, introduced a measure last week that would establish a national "do not e-mail" registry and penalize marketers who refuse to honor it. The anti-spam legislation would require the Federal Trade Commission to construct a system that informs marketers of consumers' wishes. Companies that send messages to e-mail addresses listed in the national registry could be fined $5,000 per e-mail per day. The penalties could be even more severe for spammers who send unsolicited messages to minors, including pornographic e-mail.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | October 29, 2004
NEW YORK - Time Warner Inc.'s America Online unit, Microsoft Corp., EarthLink Inc. and Yahoo Inc. - the four largest U.S. Internet mail providers - sued dozens of junk e-mail senders yesterday in a second wave of lawsuits under a new U.S. law designed to curb spam. The six lawsuits, filed in California, Georgia and Washington state, target senders of unwanted commercial e-mail peddling pornography, prescription pills, cheap mortgages and other products, the companies said in statements.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2004
Last summer, when Del. Brian J. Feldman's campaign e-mail account was hijacked by a spammer who used it to send ads for a pornographic Web site, he was flooded with replies. "Some said, `I'm interested, but I want more information,' " recalled Feldman, a Montgomery County Democrat. "Some said, `Please remove me from your distribution list.' And some - the people from my district who knew me - said, `Have you gone crazy?' " Feldman had not gone crazy. He was another victim of the computer worms that have put countless e-mail accounts at the service of spammers whose junk e-mail is driving computer users crazier every day. His experience - which he described as "a potential catastrophe for a political career" - gave an extra push to a bill the General Assembly enacted Monday night in the frantic closing hours of the session.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2004
By all accounts, Bob Morse is a solid citizen who runs a small wedding video and Web design business in northern California. So why did he send an e-mail peddling hard-core Russian pornography to Francis Uy at the Johns Hopkins University? The short answer: He didn't know he'd done it. For Uy, who works at Hopkins' Center for Talented Youth, the Russian porn offer was just one of 77 junk messages that landed in his home and office inboxes that day. From all that garbage, he had to fish out 16 e-mails that were actually for him. Both men were victims of an assault that has turned the Internet into a war zone - a contest of wills between spammers and those who would stop them.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2003
A man described as one of the world's most prolific spam distributors was arrested yesterday in Raleigh, N.C., and charged with four felony counts under Virginia's new anti-spam law in a case that experts say reflects the nation's growing frustration with annoying junk e-mail. Jeremy Jaynes, 29, who authorities say also goes by the names of Jeremy James and Gaven Stubberfield, is accused by Virginia prosecutors of flooding computer users with more than 100,000 unsolicited bulk e-mails over a monthlong period this summer and deceptively hiding his identity so that users could not trace his Internet address.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Tatum and Christine Tatum,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 19, 2003
CHICAGO - Spam-fighters are pushing a new way to stop junk e-mail that mirrors the "do not call" lists aimed at curbing telemarketers' annoying phone solicitations. Sen. Charles E. Schumer, a New York Democrat, introduced a measure last week that would establish a national "do not e-mail" registry and penalize marketers who refuse to honor it. The anti-spam legislation would require the Federal Trade Commission to construct a system that informs marketers of consumers' wishes. Companies that send messages to e-mail addresses listed in the national registry could be fined $5,000 per e-mail per day. The penalties could be even more severe for spammers who send unsolicited messages to minors, including pornographic e-mail.
ENTERTAINMENT
By T.L. Stanley and T.L. Stanley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2003
Did you ever want to know that there are 17 uses, aside from the obvious, for dryer sheets? Do you yearn for the Irish prayer of the day? Do you need to know the definition of a True Friend, or want to read the latest American, chest-pounding poem written by "a veteran"? Me neither. But I am being bombarded with the above-described e-mails, and many others, by a most unlikely source: my mom. She's spamming me. And if that's not bad enough, there's an additional rub. It will continue, clogging my computer system and working my last nerve, because I just don't have the heart to tell her to stop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
When the 5,500 sailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln in the Persian Gulf get their daily half- hour allotment of Internet time, they savor each precious second to connect with the world back home. Apparently, its a world full of folks cooking with the ultimate pasta pot, making six-figure incomes by selling junk on eBay and using anti-snoring spray to sleep quietly through the night. Such are the wares touted in millions of e-mail messages. The unsolicited advertisements known as spam have been clogging corporate computer systems and home PC in-boxes for years, costing an estimated $8.9 billion annually, according to technology market research firm Ferris Research.
ENTERTAINMENT
By T.L. Stanley and T.L. Stanley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 22, 2003
Did you ever want to know that there are 17 uses, aside from the obvious, for dryer sheets? Do you yearn for the Irish prayer of the day? Do you need to know the definition of a True Friend, or want to read the latest American, chest-pounding poem written by "a veteran"? Me neither. But I am being bombarded with the above-described e-mails, and many others, by a most unlikely source: my mom. She's spamming me. And if that's not bad enough, there's an additional rub. It will continue, clogging my computer system and working my last nerve, because I just don't have the heart to tell her to stop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By P.J. Huffstutter and P.J. Huffstutter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 2003
When the 5,500 sailors aboard the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln in the Persian Gulf get their daily half- hour allotment of Internet time, they savor each precious second to connect with the world back home. Apparently, its a world full of folks cooking with the ultimate pasta pot, making six-figure incomes by selling junk on eBay and using anti-snoring spray to sleep quietly through the night. Such are the wares touted in millions of e-mail messages. The unsolicited advertisements known as spam have been clogging corporate computer systems and home PC in-boxes for years, costing an estimated $8.9 billion annually, according to technology market research firm Ferris Research.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | December 29, 1998
SAN DIEGO -- America Online Inc., the No. 1 online service, filed another lawsuit yesterday to stop its customers from being flooded with millions of unsolicited pieces of "junk" e-mail.The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in San Diego against Michael Persaud, claims that he committed fraud by using various names to send millions of e-mail messages to America Online customers. Those messages solicit money in exchange for a directory of companies that offer home employment.The lawsuit is one of nine filed by AOL in five states against people who send out "spam," a term for unwanted electronic mail.
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