Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpam
IN THE NEWS

Spam

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 22, 2004
WE'RE SPAMMED if we do, spammed if we don't -- at least for now. That's the depressing reality underlying the Federal Trade Commission's announcement last week that it won't back a national "do not e-mail" list to cut down on unsolicited commercial e-mail, much like the new "do not call" list aimed at limiting intrusions by telemarketers. In a show of defeat in the escalating war against the flood of spam clogging computer inboxes and eating up Internet bandwidth worldwide, the FTC said there's simply no assurance spammers wouldn't use a no-spam list as a surefire guide to valid e-mail addresses -- and there would be little that authorities could do to prevent that.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
A few years ago, Billy Malkin decided there was a lack of high-quality sushi delivery along the Baltimore waterfront. So he convinced a friend, Eugene McDowell, to partner with him on a place of their own. Before opening the Sushi Place in Fells Prospect last July, Malkin and McDowell were not restaurant-industry veterans. They were sushi lovers and businessmen; both own local construction companies. Their business acumen shows. With personable service and a menu stacked with creative, well-executed sushi and Asian food, the Sushi Place has earned its considerable popularity.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 1, 2003
THE HUMORIST Dave Barry recently defined spammers -- sending out millions of bulk, unsolicited and often fraudulent e-mails -- as "the mutant spawn of a bizarre reproductive act involving a telemarketer, Larry Flynt, a tapeworm, and an executive of the third-class mail industry." Trouble is, spam is no joke, having exploded so much over the last year or so that it's become much less of a mere annoyance and much more of a costly monster begging for federal regulation -- which may be coming later this year.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 5, 2011
Best Buy. Target. 1-800-Flowers. New York & Company . These are just a sampling of some of the companies that warned consumers this week that their email addresses may have been compromised through Epsilon Data Management , which provides online mail services. The companies are warning consumers that only their email addresses and possibly names would have been exposed. Still, people should be on the lookout for more spam and vigilant against potentially more phishing attempts.
NEWS
By DERRICK Z. JACKSON | December 8, 1992
Boston. -- A few months ago, not long after I wrote about my many unexpected encounters with Spam in Hawaii, I received a box in the mail. It was a six-pack of Spam products from Hormel.There were two cans of original Spam, two cans of 25-percent-less-salt Spam and two cans of 25-percent-less-fat-and-salt Spam Lite. Of course, the fine print on the side of the 25-percent-less varieties said, ''Not Recommended For Sodium Restricted Diet.''An enclosed letter said, ''Please accept this gift of 'Hawaiian Soul Food' as a souvenir of your spring vacation to Hawaii.
TRAVEL
By Tricia Bishop | September 2, 2001
What's pink and squishy and was once called a war-time delicacy? It's Spam, the "miracle meat in a can" that first hit supermarket shelves in 1937 and is now about to get its own museum. It seems the spiced ham -- hence, "Spam" -- is more popular than ever. Set to open Sept. 15 in Austin, Minn., the Spam Museum pays tribute to one of the country's most-loved and most-loathed food products and the company that makes it: Hormel (whose Austin headquarters are about 100 miles south of Minneapolis)
NEWS
March 29, 2003
NEED SOME real cheap Viagra? asks doctorxyao@netscape.net How about a way to eliminate credit card debt without filing bankruptcy! offers lacroze@yahoff.com.hk Would you like to look 20 again? sw3hss7a0t@erols.com wants to know. Make a fortune in ADVERTISING! shouts 1popme1sjoh@aol.com Re: extra inches, promises tripodxffe@yahoo.com. Oh, that's right, this isn't your computer desktop, increasingly littered these days with such unsolicited e-mails -- otherwise wonderfully known as spam.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 28, 2001
Every day, I open my e-mail (Microsoft Outlook Express) only to find dozens of pieces of spam. The junk mail is basically the same - end debt, start your own Web site, make money, etc. The problem is, I'm not in debt, I have a Web site and I have a job. Is there a blocking feature that will stop these ads, many from the same sender, from reaching my e-mail box? The Microsoft Outlook Express e-mail software that comes with Windows 98 and Windows ME uses a strategy known as Message Rules to handle unwanted e-mail, as well as to streamline dealing with mail you want.
ENTERTAINMENT
By kevin cowherd and kevin cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
Some things should never make a comeback: the Yugo, Celebrity Boxing with Tonya Harding and Danny Bonaduce, the lime-green pantsuit Hillary Clinton wore on her first campaign swing through Iowa. I put Spam on the no-comeback list, too. Yet now comes word that Spam - the pink slab of pork and ham that comes in a can from Hormel, not the junk mail in your inbox - has become wildly popular again in this staggering economy. At a little over two bucks a can, it's a cheap way to eat something that looks like meat's illegimate cousin, but is, in fact, actual meat.
FEATURES
By Rosemary Knower | October 31, 1990
I won't say that everybody has a Spam story, but many people do. Mine begins once upon a time in Baltimore, when four friends lived at the top of Wickham Road, just near a big, jungly forest of tall trees. Now, the four friends had been told by their mothers not to go into the forest, but they kept looking longingly at the green and secret depths, so close to their red brick row houses."You'll get ticks," said their mothers. "You'll fall and get hurt. You'll get lost. You'll get dirty!"One fateful Saturday afternoon, the four had, as usual, blown their allowances in Irvington on a movie (25 cents)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2010
Let's face it, the '80s will never truly be gone. Like bedbugs, Cher and Spam, the decade will always be around in some repackaged form. Just recently, the New Kids on the Block — yes, Donnie, Danny, Joey, Jordan and Jonathan — announced a reunion tour, which they'll perform with their '90s doppelgangers, the Backstreet Boys. Rick Springfield, '80s heartthrob and lover of Jesse's girl, released a new biography this year, "Late, Late at Night. " And on stage at the Hippodrome last month?
ENTERTAINMENT
By kevin cowherd and kevin cowherd,kevin.cowherd@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
Some things should never make a comeback: the Yugo, Celebrity Boxing with Tonya Harding and Danny Bonaduce, the lime-green pantsuit Hillary Clinton wore on her first campaign swing through Iowa. I put Spam on the no-comeback list, too. Yet now comes word that Spam - the pink slab of pork and ham that comes in a can from Hormel, not the junk mail in your inbox - has become wildly popular again in this staggering economy. At a little over two bucks a can, it's a cheap way to eat something that looks like meat's illegimate cousin, but is, in fact, actual meat.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | October 26, 2008
Beware of a spam e-mail claiming to be from FBI Director John S. Pistole. The FBI warns that the fraudulent e-mail advises recipients that they are the beneficiary of a large sum of money, which they will be permitted to access once fees are paid and personal banking information is provided. The appearance of the e-mail, which incorporates photographs of FBI officials and the FBI seal, leads a recipient to believe that it is authentic. The typical schemes using the FBI name's are lottery endorsements and inheritance notifications, but they can cover a range of scams, including threats and malicious computer program attachments to bogus online auctions.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | September 28, 2008
Let's dish about spam - the kind that comes in a can at the grocery store and the kind that fills up your computer's in-box. First, let's consider original Spam, a pork and ham food product that is formed into a block. I always thought pork and ham were somewhat similar if not interchangeable terms. Thankfully, the official Spam Web site reveals that ham refers to a specific cut of meat - the upper hind leg - whereas pork can refer to "several delicious cuts." To me, this means pork probably includes many "delicious cuts" we might never before have considered delicious, but which turn out to be darn yummy when rendered unrecognizable, pressed into a generic meatloaf.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 17, 2008
The University of Alabama at Birmingham's Spam Data Mine is warning consumers about a new spam trend using MSNBC that attempts to trick e-mail readers into clicking on a site that will infect their computers. UAB says that since the new spam attack is based on real e-mail messages sent to MSNBC Alert subscribers, it will be nearly impossible to block the spam without also blocking legitimate MSNBC mail. Gary Warner, UAB's director of computer forensics, said that for several days last week, one of the top spam messages detected by the Spam Data Mine was "CNN Alerts: my Custom Alert," which forged a CNN e-mail.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang | August 3, 2008
Two spam e-mail messages floating around the Internet contain a malicious virus that forces you to wipe your hard drive clean to get rid of the infection, warns the Better Business Bureau of Greater Maryland. One e-mail purports to be from UPS, telling the recipient that a shipment could not be delivered. The reader is asked to open an attachment to gain access to an invoice waybill in order to pick up the shipment, the BBB says. The attachment contains the damaging virus. The second e-mail, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, directs the recipient to click on a link to read an article about the FBI vs. Facebook.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | January 1, 2004
Happy New Year! Is your inbox any cleaner yet? Theoretically, it should be. The federal Can-Spam Act officially took effect when the clock ticked off the last second of 2003, which means those creeps who have been sending us pitches for mail-order Viagra, body-part enhancers, diet supplements, cut-rate mortgages, intimate photos of bored Russian housewives and, of course, anti-spam programs, are supposed to clean up their act. What are the odds that...
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH | January 15, 2006
It seems that everyone has a blog these days - a spot that others can visit to find out what they have to say about something or nothing in particular. Some blogs are widely valued fonts of specialized wisdom, but many are viewed as uninteresting expressions of personal ego. The difficulty of sorting the good blogs from the bad can be a frustrating challenge - one that is seen as a serious threat to what has been viewed as a vital feature of the Internet. Now, three University of Maryland, Baltimore County researchers have made a far more disturbing conclusion about blogs.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG | May 18, 2008
Early this year, Gary Brawerman's e-mail account was hijacked. As much of a nightmare that was, it didn't compare to the lack of concern he found when he called his Internet service provider, Comcast Corp., for help. Brawerman noticed trouble Jan. 21 when he went to log on to the e-mail account he'd used for four years but could not access it. The system couldn't even find his e-mail address. "That's when I knew something was wrong," said Brawerman, owner of a local mattress store. "I called Comcast and they told me they needed 24 hours."
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | February 6, 2008
meatpaper.com The online version of the new journal Meatpaper is about meat "as a provocative cultural symbol and phenomenon," write the editors. You can read articles on kosher animal slaughter and on an artist who has made a map of the world out of Spam.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.