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NEWS
By William Rice and William Rice,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2002
Here's an all-vegetable, two-course meal. If you've never experienced the fun of creating spaghetti-like strands by pulling apart the aptly named spaghetti squash, you are in for a treat. Mushrooms cooked with tomato, garlic, herbs and a dash of ground red pepper make a full-flavored, satisfying topping for the squash. Furthermore, having a "pasta" without flour or eggs means we can treat ourselves to a starchy first course. The addition of the sweet-sour vinegar reduction and dabs of blue cheese takes our potato to a whole new level of taste.
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HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, For The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from Rachel Ernzen. This time of year, consider featuring local winter squash. Winter squash packs a nutritional punch and its varieties are rich in fiber, vitamin A and potassium. There are many markets and grocery stores that offer produce grown within the state or from neighboring states. Here's a sampling of fun facts, tidbits and some suggestions for serving winter squash (generalizations of recipes I have at home or have made up)
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FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | December 15, 1993
With an investment of only a few minutes of time, you can jTC concoct this scrumptious, low-fat meal. The crunchy crown for the fish fillet seals in the juices and adds a lively nut and herb flavor. Any whitefish fillet will work for this dish as long as it is at least 3/4 -inch thick. Other suggestions are grouper, cod, red snapper or halibut.Spaghetti squash is a most interesting vegetable full of vitamins, especially beta carotene.When cooked, the delicate flesh separates into spaghetti-like strands.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Sun | August 2, 2008
Last year, I let a volunteer white morning glory grow in my garden. This year, I have vines curling and climbing over everything. How can I keep the plant in one spot? If you didn't plant the morning glory, it's probably bindweed (Convolvulus arvensi), which is a noxious guest that will never behave. Bindweed spreads by an extensive root system and seeds that can stay viable for 60 years. To kill it, exhaust the root system by pulling it every three weeks. You can also apply a systemic herbicide (absorbed into the plant's system)
HEALTH
By Rachel Ernzen, For The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from Rachel Ernzen. This time of year, consider featuring local winter squash. Winter squash packs a nutritional punch and its varieties are rich in fiber, vitamin A and potassium. There are many markets and grocery stores that offer produce grown within the state or from neighboring states. Here's a sampling of fun facts, tidbits and some suggestions for serving winter squash (generalizations of recipes I have at home or have made up)
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld,Special to The Sun | August 2, 2008
Last year, I let a volunteer white morning glory grow in my garden. This year, I have vines curling and climbing over everything. How can I keep the plant in one spot? If you didn't plant the morning glory, it's probably bindweed (Convolvulus arvensi), which is a noxious guest that will never behave. Bindweed spreads by an extensive root system and seeds that can stay viable for 60 years. To kill it, exhaust the root system by pulling it every three weeks. You can also apply a systemic herbicide (absorbed into the plant's system)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 25, 1996
Bangkok Delight, a Thai restaurant in Columbia, changed hands in the past year and was taken over by Pornpilai Boonn, a doctor of pathology turned mom turned restaurateur. With that background, I wondered, could she know anything about cooking?The answer, not to keep you in suspense, is yes.Until I had dinner at Bangkok Delight, I didn't realize there was a category beyond hot in Thai food. You wimps go ahead and order your food mild, medium or hot. But at Bangkok Delight there's a fourth choice, "Thai native."
FEATURES
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | October 18, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyPrepare your own roast turkey breast today.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 3, 1999
Bulle Rock, the public golf course that opened in Harford County last spring, quickly became famous for having extremely high greens fees - $126 a round, to be exact.Bulle Rock (named after a famed thoroughbred) got more press when it was recently voted Golf Digest's best new upscale public golf course for 1998.What you don't hear about is Bulle Rock's restaurant, which looks like a public golf course's dining room - nothing fancy, in other words - but has a chef who formerly worked at the Milton Inn and Hamilton's.
FEATURES
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 1998
Rudys' 2900 is a perennial favorite of people who prefer their food to be more Continental than cutting-edge. Food that's not trendy, or stodgy, but polished.Throw in an attractive dining room with country-club panache and a gracious staff, and you have an idea of what has made this Finksburg restaurant so popular.There are actually two Rudys at the helm ` Rudy Paul and Rudy Speckamp, who opened their doors in Carroll County in 1983. Paul is likely to greet you at the door and drop by your table during dinner, while chef Speckamp is turning butter into sophisticated sauces with kitchen alchemy.
NEWS
By William Rice and William Rice,Special to the Sun | March 3, 2002
Here's an all-vegetable, two-course meal. If you've never experienced the fun of creating spaghetti-like strands by pulling apart the aptly named spaghetti squash, you are in for a treat. Mushrooms cooked with tomato, garlic, herbs and a dash of ground red pepper make a full-flavored, satisfying topping for the squash. Furthermore, having a "pasta" without flour or eggs means we can treat ourselves to a starchy first course. The addition of the sweet-sour vinegar reduction and dabs of blue cheese takes our potato to a whole new level of taste.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | January 3, 1999
Bulle Rock, the public golf course that opened in Harford County last spring, quickly became famous for having extremely high greens fees - $126 a round, to be exact.Bulle Rock (named after a famed thoroughbred) got more press when it was recently voted Golf Digest's best new upscale public golf course for 1998.What you don't hear about is Bulle Rock's restaurant, which looks like a public golf course's dining room - nothing fancy, in other words - but has a chef who formerly worked at the Milton Inn and Hamilton's.
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 1998
Winter squash are the emblems of fall: cream-colored Sweet Dumpling, striated with hunter-green lines; knobbly Hubbard, powdery blue and flecked with buff-colored nodes; two-toned, turban-shaped buttercup; and Lakota, a bright orange-and-green Native American heirloom.Gathered in artful array, they make beautiful decorations. More important, they are a great source of beta carotene and vitamins. What distinguishes winter squash from summer squash is their low moisture content, which translates into a spectacular ability to keep and retain their nutritional value.
FEATURES
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | October 18, 1998
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick.Sunday/FamilyPrepare your own roast turkey breast today.
FEATURES
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 1998
Rudys' 2900 is a perennial favorite of people who prefer their food to be more Continental than cutting-edge. Food that's not trendy, or stodgy, but polished.Throw in an attractive dining room with country-club panache and a gracious staff, and you have an idea of what has made this Finksburg restaurant so popular.There are actually two Rudys at the helm ` Rudy Paul and Rudy Speckamp, who opened their doors in Carroll County in 1983. Paul is likely to greet you at the door and drop by your table during dinner, while chef Speckamp is turning butter into sophisticated sauces with kitchen alchemy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | April 25, 1996
Bangkok Delight, a Thai restaurant in Columbia, changed hands in the past year and was taken over by Pornpilai Boonn, a doctor of pathology turned mom turned restaurateur. With that background, I wondered, could she know anything about cooking?The answer, not to keep you in suspense, is yes.Until I had dinner at Bangkok Delight, I didn't realize there was a category beyond hot in Thai food. You wimps go ahead and order your food mild, medium or hot. But at Bangkok Delight there's a fourth choice, "Thai native."
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 18, 1998
Winter squash are the emblems of fall: cream-colored Sweet Dumpling, striated with hunter-green lines; knobbly Hubbard, powdery blue and flecked with buff-colored nodes; two-toned, turban-shaped buttercup; and Lakota, a bright orange-and-green Native American heirloom.Gathered in artful array, they make beautiful decorations. More important, they are a great source of beta carotene and vitamins. What distinguishes winter squash from summer squash is their low moisture content, which translates into a spectacular ability to keep and retain their nutritional value.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | September 25, 1991
Harold Marmulstein, executive chef of the Polo Grill, and his teammates won second place in the recent Gulf of Mexico Seafood Culinary Competition in Mobile, Ala.Teaming up with chefs Thomas Catherall and Joan Trotochard of Atlanta's Azalea restaurant and Jim Alexander of Rome, Ga., Marmulstein prepared a variety of dishes in the three-day national competition.One of the prize-winning dishes was smoked and grilled amberjack with spaghetti squash.For finishing second in the 19-team event, Marmulstein and his colleagues were awarded $2,000 each.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | December 15, 1993
With an investment of only a few minutes of time, you can jTC concoct this scrumptious, low-fat meal. The crunchy crown for the fish fillet seals in the juices and adds a lively nut and herb flavor. Any whitefish fillet will work for this dish as long as it is at least 3/4 -inch thick. Other suggestions are grouper, cod, red snapper or halibut.Spaghetti squash is a most interesting vegetable full of vitamins, especially beta carotene.When cooked, the delicate flesh separates into spaghetti-like strands.
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