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By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | April 4, 2007
Production of our favorite spaghetti-sauce ingredient, Spatini, was ceased in January by its maker, Lawry's. It's been difficult to find a replacement. Better yet would be an ingredients list for me to try to make the mix at home. Spatini is the brand name of a packet of seasonings that you add to either a tomato paste and water, unseasoned tomato sauce or canned tomatoes to make spaghetti sauce. I found a list of Spatini's ingredients on foodfacts.com: sugar, salt, dehydrated onion, potato starch, spices, natural flavors (including dairy)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
Kathleen Wilson from Laurel was looking for a recipe she lost during a move for what she called "lazy-day lasagna". She said the original recipe came from the back of a Mueller's pasta box some 25 years ago and was very good and easy. Donna Smith from Baltimore saw Wilson's request and said she "had to smile". She said that her mother gave her this recipe back in 1973 at her bridal shower as one of several "must-have" dishes for any new bride. Smith says that this lasagna comes together quickly and is very satisfying.
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FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | November 10, 1993
Spaghetti sauce and strawberry bread have two things in common. Both begin with the letter "S" and both are taste treats.Deborah J. Miles of Marriottsville asked for the sauce recipe which, "was demonstrated on the Regis and Kathie Lee show. I hope a reader copied it and then didn't lose it the way I did," she wrote.Margaret A. Schultz of Reisterstown sent in Chef Gilles Syglowski's choice. "I am certain this is the recipe," she wrote.Schultz's spaghetti sauce2 pounds ground chuck4 large cans tomato sauce1 large can tomato paste2 tablespoons olive oil1 large onion, diced1 cup dried parsley1/2 teaspoon oregano2 teaspoons crushed garlicsalt and pepper to tasteIn a large saucepan, brown beef and drain off fat. Add all other ingredients to the pan and bring to a boil.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 16, 2008
Angelina Tadduni, a founder of the popular Northeast Baltimore restaurant that bears her name and where she spent nearly 50 years preparing her signature piquant spaghetti sauce and pans of homemade ravioli and manicotti, died of pneumonia Saturday at a niece's home in Airville, Pa. She was 92. Angelina Russo, the daughter of immigrant Italian parents, was born in Baltimore and raised in Little Italy. She was a graduate of St. Leo's parochial school and the Institute of Notre Dame. As a girl, Mrs. Tadduni learned cooking the Italian way from her mother, who was a native of Messina, Sicily.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | September 21, 1994
Get out the spaghetti pot, the pasta and the cookie sheet and you'll be all set for these recipes.M. G. McLaughlin of Baltimore asked for a sour cream cookie recipe and Rosemarie Felton of Columbia responded.Felton's Sour Cream Sugar CookiesMakes about 8 dozen cookies1/2 cup butter or margarine1 1/2 cups sugar2 eggs1 teaspoon vanilla3 cups sifted flour1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon baking powder1/2 teaspoon soda1 cup sour creamCream butter, or margarine, to consistency of mayonnaise. Gradually add sugar and continue creaming adding one egg at a time.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,Knight-Ridder TribuneCHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 20, 1996
The next time you pick up a jar of Jif or Skippy or another brand of peanut butter, check the label not just for fat but for sugars. Do the same with spaghetti sauce and ketchup.Surprised?People expect cookies and candy, cakes and colas to contain sugar. They're supposed to be sweet but peanut butter?The truth is that America craves sweets: This country seems to be undergoing an unrestrained escalation in sugar consumption, from gloppy grape candy to oversized, syrupy restaurant desserts.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | July 21, 1999
To celebrate its 100th anniversary, Pollio Dairy Products has created a quick recipe featuring the company's Polly-O ricotta and mozzarella. Other brands of cheese should work as well.Speedy Skillet PastaServes 4 to 61 pound ground beef1 (28-ounce) jar spaghetti sauce2 cups water3 cups pasta, uncooked1 (15-ounce) container ricotta cheese2 cups (8 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheeseBrown meat in large skillet until cooked through. Drain off excess fat.Stir in spaghetti sauce and 2 cups water and bring to boil.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Staff Writer | January 20, 1993
Attention fund-raisers -- think you could sell tickets for a spaghetti dinner? Any non-profit group or charity in the Baltimore area that needs to raise money for its activities can get a helping hand from Prego Spaghetti Sauce.Prego will supply any group that wants to hold a spaghetti dinner with a detailed guide to organizing the event, including recipes, shopping lists and tips as well as promotional materials, including flyers, banners, and a press release for local newspapers. Prego is also offering coupons so fund-raisers can buy Prego Spaghetti Sauce at a local grocery store.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
Kathleen Wilson from Laurel was looking for a recipe she lost during a move for what she called "lazy-day lasagna". She said the original recipe came from the back of a Mueller's pasta box some 25 years ago and was very good and easy. Donna Smith from Baltimore saw Wilson's request and said she "had to smile". She said that her mother gave her this recipe back in 1973 at her bridal shower as one of several "must-have" dishes for any new bride. Smith says that this lasagna comes together quickly and is very satisfying.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 1996
A tiny sprinkling of hot red pepper is all you need to add a deliciously devilish touch to the simple, very low-fat pasta dish called farfalle Fra Diavolo.In Italian, "Fra Diavolo" means "Friar Devil" or "Brother Devil." However, this dish is so low in fat, you will have little to repent for.The sauce is made with a technique called "steam frying," in which you cook the vegetables in rapidly boiling liquid instead of hot oil or butter. You add no extra fat during cooking. Steam frying thoroughly cooks the vegetables, but leaves them crisp.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | April 16, 2008
Dianne Pearson of Columbia was looking for a recipe for making meat lasagna without pre-boiling the noodles. Betsy Howells of Redmond, Ore., e-mailed her recipe for no-boil lasagna that she said is her "trouble- and mess-free method for making an Italian classic." The dish comes together quickly, thanks to the use of bottled spaghetti sauce and the fact that you don't have to boil the noodles. It can be assembled in advance and refrigerated. The key is to use plenty of sauce and to cook it slowly at a low heat to allow the noodles to soften and the flavors to blend.
NEWS
By Erica Marcus and Erica Marcus,NEWSDAY | April 4, 2007
Production of our favorite spaghetti-sauce ingredient, Spatini, was ceased in January by its maker, Lawry's. It's been difficult to find a replacement. Better yet would be an ingredients list for me to try to make the mix at home. Spatini is the brand name of a packet of seasonings that you add to either a tomato paste and water, unseasoned tomato sauce or canned tomatoes to make spaghetti sauce. I found a list of Spatini's ingredients on foodfacts.com: sugar, salt, dehydrated onion, potato starch, spices, natural flavors (including dairy)
NEWS
December 21, 2005
William R. Hutchison, 75, a leading scholar of American religious history, died Friday at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. The cause of death was stomach cancer, according to his daughter, Elizabeth. At the time of his death, Dr. Hutchison was Charles Warren research professor of American religious history at Harvard Divinity School. Dr. Hutchison was `'the dean of American religious historians," David Hollinger, chairman of the history department at the University of California, Berkeley, said yesterday.
FEATURES
By NEWSDAY | July 21, 1999
To celebrate its 100th anniversary, Pollio Dairy Products has created a quick recipe featuring the company's Polly-O ricotta and mozzarella. Other brands of cheese should work as well.Speedy Skillet PastaServes 4 to 61 pound ground beef1 (28-ounce) jar spaghetti sauce2 cups water3 cups pasta, uncooked1 (15-ounce) container ricotta cheese2 cups (8 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheeseBrown meat in large skillet until cooked through. Drain off excess fat.Stir in spaghetti sauce and 2 cups water and bring to boil.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,Knight-Ridder TribuneCHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 20, 1996
The next time you pick up a jar of Jif or Skippy or another brand of peanut butter, check the label not just for fat but for sugars. Do the same with spaghetti sauce and ketchup.Surprised?People expect cookies and candy, cakes and colas to contain sugar. They're supposed to be sweet but peanut butter?The truth is that America craves sweets: This country seems to be undergoing an unrestrained escalation in sugar consumption, from gloppy grape candy to oversized, syrupy restaurant desserts.
FEATURES
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE NEWS SERVICE | February 18, 1996
A tiny sprinkling of hot red pepper is all you need to add a deliciously devilish touch to the simple, very low-fat pasta dish called farfalle Fra Diavolo.In Italian, "Fra Diavolo" means "Friar Devil" or "Brother Devil." However, this dish is so low in fat, you will have little to repent for.The sauce is made with a technique called "steam frying," in which you cook the vegetables in rapidly boiling liquid instead of hot oil or butter. You add no extra fat during cooking. Steam frying thoroughly cooks the vegetables, but leaves them crisp.
NEWS
December 21, 2005
William R. Hutchison, 75, a leading scholar of American religious history, died Friday at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. The cause of death was stomach cancer, according to his daughter, Elizabeth. At the time of his death, Dr. Hutchison was Charles Warren research professor of American religious history at Harvard Divinity School. Dr. Hutchison was `'the dean of American religious historians," David Hollinger, chairman of the history department at the University of California, Berkeley, said yesterday.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | November 26, 1995
Recently I had a simple, foolproof idea for eliminating the drug problem in this country. It came to me while I was making spaghetti sauce.I use an ancient Italian spaghetti-sauce recipe that has been handed down through many generations of ancient Italians, as follows:Buy some spaghetti sauce.Heat it up.Sometimes I add some seasoning to the sauce, to give it a dash of what the Italians call "joie de vivre" (literally, "ingredients"). I had purchased, from the supermarket spice section, a small plastic container labeled "Italian Seasoning."
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