Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpaghetti
IN THE NEWS

Spaghetti

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 4, 2013
Whole Foods Market, the latest retailer to offer government shutdown specials, has invited shoppers in on Sunday for a free spaghetti dinner. "With no end in sight to the government shutdown, wanted to pass along what Whole Foods Market is planning to do to help in the community," Katie Malloy, a spokeswoman for the grocer, said in an email. "Because federal workers are not just customers -- they're neighbors, partners, family and friends. " Malloy says Whole Foods is offering more free samples, Wi-Fi and seating to encourage consumers, furloughed or not, to gather at the stores.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By John McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Some ass at Deadspin has had the presumption to describe Cincinnati chili as " the worst regional foodstuff in America or anywhere else. "  We can only deplore an impoverished palate unable to appreciate the finest of fast foods, and partly on odd and illegitimate grounds.  The writer thinks the less of Cincinnati chili because it is spread over spaghetti noodles, and because it was invented in the 1920s by Greeks who had the temerity...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez, For The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
My parents grew up about a mile-and-a-half and a cultural universe away from one another in Depression-era southeast Baltimore. Dad was a paperboy in a largely Italian and German section of Highlandtown long ago called "the Hill" and now known as Greektown. Mom, whose mother was a textile worker and the family breadwinner, came from an almost monolithic Polish colony along Boston Street, a neighborhood of broom factories, lumberyards and canneries remembered as "old" Canton. Because it was Baltimore, the neighborhoods had one fundamental cuisine in common: Chesapeake Bay blue crabs, both plentiful and reasonably priced.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | November 10, 2013
Hey, now we're talking! Sunday night's episode of "The Walking Dead" - "Internment" - really delivered some action and plot development. It also delivered some comedy gold, as King of Comedy Hershel held court while performing dental surgery. "I hereby declare we have Spaghetti Tuesday every Wednesday, first thing we need to acquire is some pusketti . " That genius line still has me going. Who is he? Steven Wright? Mitch Hedberg? That line was so brilliant cause it was packed with two jokes: first, Spaghetti Tuesday every Wednesday?
NEWS
By ROSALIE M. FALTER | January 17, 1994
A hearty spaghetti meal is just the ticket for these cold winter evenings. Two neighborhood mens' groups are planning spaghetti dinners for Saturday.The United Methodist Men of the Linthicum Heights United Methodist Church is sponsoring a pasta repast from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday in the church's Fellowship Hall, 200 School Lane.The price is $6 for adults, $4 for children ages 12 and younger.For information, call 859-0990.The United Methodist Men of Ferndale United Methodist Church invites everyone to its spaghetti sit-down at 6 p.m. Saturday in the Fellowship Hall, 117 Ferndale Road.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | December 1, 1993
An incorrect baking time was given in the recipe for Spaghetti Pie in yesterday's A La Carte section. The pie should be baked, uncovered, for 25 minutes, then baked for 5 more minutes after the shredded mozzarella is added.The Sun regrets the error.While watching Mr. Food, Art Ginsberg, recently demonstrate recipes from his three new on-the-mark cookbooks ("Mr. Food Cooks Pasta" or "Chicken" or "Dessert") I was struck by the excitement he created in his audience over his simple, homey spaghetti pie, crunchy on the outside with a smooth rich interior.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Words are George Bush's enemies; President-elect Bill Clinton has showed that they can be his friends.That was the dominant impression of a presidential style in embryo as it emerged yesterday in Little Rock, Ark., from Mr. Clinton's first full-dress news conference since his victory 10 days ago. Whatever one thought of the substance of what he said -- and there was plenty of room for argument, because he stated his view bluntly in some cases...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
Uh-O.Have Americans really been eating Spaghetti-O's for 30 years? Has "The Neat Round Spaghetti You Can Eat With A Spoon" really reached the age where it can no longer be trusted? Can it be true that a second generation of kids is devouring can-after-can of "The Greatest Invention Since the Napkin?"You bet. And while it may not seem like a product whose birthday should rank with the hula hoop or even Spam, don't sell those O's short as a cultural icon. They've shown up on that greatest of all pop-culture barometers, David Letterman's Top-10 lists (Signs the Easter Bunny is Nuts: No. 5, Home filled with thousands of old bodybuilding magazines and cans of Spaghetti-O's)
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | January 14, 1996
DIETARY recommendations issued last week by the federal government declared that a little wine with dinner is not such a bad thing, that some meats should be consumed only in moderation and that even modest weight gains with age are not healthy.These recommendations surprised a great many, who have found the federal guidelines in the past to be wishy-washy and covered with the fingerprints of various agricultural lobbyists. Equally surprising, however, was the fact that nowhere in the new guidelines was it recommended that we consume miles of spaghetti on plates the size of garbage-can lids.
NEWS
By Erika D. Peterman and Erika D. Peterman,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1998
For the better part of a week, Tina Thompson's and Adrienne Via's lives were consumed by pasta and glue.The 19-year-olds -- engineering students at the Johns Hopkins University -- spent up to seven hours a day piecing together strands of spaghetti that would eventually become the "Cheesecake Bay Bridge," an intricate series of ladder-like shapes supported by longer pieces of pasta.The results were impressive, but the process became, well, a drag. Gluing spaghetti "gets sort of boring," Via said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rafael Alvarez, For The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
My parents grew up about a mile-and-a-half and a cultural universe away from one another in Depression-era southeast Baltimore. Dad was a paperboy in a largely Italian and German section of Highlandtown long ago called "the Hill" and now known as Greektown. Mom, whose mother was a textile worker and the family breadwinner, came from an almost monolithic Polish colony along Boston Street, a neighborhood of broom factories, lumberyards and canneries remembered as "old" Canton. Because it was Baltimore, the neighborhoods had one fundamental cuisine in common: Chesapeake Bay blue crabs, both plentiful and reasonably priced.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 4, 2013
Whole Foods Market, the latest retailer to offer government shutdown specials, has invited shoppers in on Sunday for a free spaghetti dinner. "With no end in sight to the government shutdown, wanted to pass along what Whole Foods Market is planning to do to help in the community," Katie Malloy, a spokeswoman for the grocer, said in an email. "Because federal workers are not just customers -- they're neighbors, partners, family and friends. " Malloy says Whole Foods is offering more free samples, Wi-Fi and seating to encourage consumers, furloughed or not, to gather at the stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette,
The Baltimore Sun
| July 15, 2013
In my continuing attempt to eat only what is already in my fridge and pantry all week, this recipe, which I found in WomenHeart's All Heart Family Cookbook (Rodale, 2008), appealed to me because I knew I could adapt it easily. The original recipe was called "Happy Heart Pasta Primavera" and included shrimp, tomatoes and broccoli. Since I didn't have those items, I decided to increase the amounts of some of the other ingredients, like onions and carrots.  I imagine the original recipe is really delicious, because this scaled-back version was pretty good, too, for a simple Sunday night supper.
NEWS
April 12, 2013
Community United Methodist Church is holding a spaghetti dinner and variety show, Friday, April 12, at 300 Brock Bridge Road. Dinner is served at 6:30 p.m., and the show begins at 7:30 p.m., All proceeds go to support church's Youth Mission trip in July. For information, call 301-725-4918.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Brenda Cox from Raleigh, N.C., was looking for a recipe for making a baked spaghetti casserole like the one her mother used to make back in the 1950s. She remembers that her mother used tomato soup in her recipe. She has tried over the years to recreate the dish without success. Wilma Muir from Street saw Cox's request and sent in a recipe for the casserole that she said she found in one of her old cookbooks called "A Campbell Cookbook, Cooking with Soup," revised in 1982.
EXPLORE
February 15, 2013
The Laurel Fourth of July Committee will hold an all-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner to raise funds for this year's Independence Day celebration in Laurel. The dinner is Saturday, Feb. 23, from 4 to 7 p.m. at the Laurel Police Department's Partnership Activity Center, 811 Fifth St. Menu includes spaghetti with or without meatballs, salad, bread, cookies, iced tea, lemonade and coffee. Dinner costs for adults is $10 in advance and $12 at the door; takeout is $9. Cost for ages 3 to 12 is $5, and children under 3 eat for free.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
An Eldersburg church is offering an Election Day drive-through spaghetti dinner to those too weary to cook after a day at the office and lines at the polls. Patrons can pick up the Italian fare, complete with tossed salad, garlic bread and choice of homemade dessert. While about 200 pounds of pasta and 50 gallons of sauce simmers, the youth ministry at Wesley Freedom United Methodist Church will set up tented service stations on the parking lot today. They promise prompt delivery to idling dinner guests who can buy meal tickets and place their orders, choose salad dressing and dessert and carry off heaping plates of warm pasta, all without leaving the comfort of their cars.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
Yevgeniy Semenov's hands shook as he gently added metal weight after metal weight to a chain suspended from the center of a bridge made entirely of uncooked spaghetti. It is usually better suited to marinara sauce than mechanical engineering, but Semenov and two fellow 18-year-old freshmen at the Johns Hopkins University had spent several long nights and gallons of glue turning thin strands of pasta into a miniature highway structure, complete with arches, struts and supports. Spanning the gap between two tables, the bridge did its main job -- holding the 22 pounds necessary for the three to win the reward of skipping their final exam for their introductory engineering class.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | September 24, 2012
"Ordinary men avoid trouble, extraordinary men turn it to their advantage. " - Gaston Means Nucky Thompson has ever been the disciplined emperor with an attention to detail, but this week we found him forgetting what day it was, blowing off the Pope, pontificating on semi-retirement and indisposed when his latest liquor shipment hit a monumental snag. All this happened while he was crafting his hobo-inspired recipes in a crappy apartment with a heating problem. And people say this show doesn't have enough action.
EXPLORE
April 18, 2012
Dublin United Methodist Church will hold a spaghetti with meat sauce, all-you-can-eat salad bar, garlic bread, dessert and beverage dinner in the Fellowship Hall from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Saturday. Adults are $10, children 5 to 10 are $5 and children under 5 are free. Coming events Yard sale at Dublin United Methodist Church June 9. Vacation Bible School July 16 to 20. Summer Fun Camp at the Wilson Ministry Center from June 18 to Aug. 17 from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Monday through Friday.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.