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By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 1, 2007
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Two NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station ventured outside for more than seven hours yesterday to turn on the orbital lab's permanent cooling system. Spacewalkers Michael Lopez-Alegria and Sunita Williams disconnected an interim setup that supported the station during its first phase of construction. Then they reattached fluid lines and electrical cables to one of two coolant systems that will service the outpost for its remaining life. The other will be switched over during a spacewalk scheduled for Sunday.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 2, 2007
The governor of Maryland recently brought to mind the majestic though scary sight of astronauts floating outside their spacecraft, endeavoring to make repairs. Walks in space are usually successful, but the peril is inescapable, along with the questions: Does he have the right tools? Will the tethering umbilical hold? Can the work be done in one walk, or will another be needed? Will the support crew do its job? Maryland's ship of state had soared into the remoteness of deficit spending before Gov. Martin O'Malley arrived in Annapolis.
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NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton and Michael Cabbage and Robyn Shelton,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 2, 2005
HOUSTON - Astronaut Steve Robinson will make an unprecedented spacewalk beneath the belly of shuttle Discovery tomorrow to remove two small strips of material sticking out of the ship's heat shielding. The so-called "gap fillers" are ceramic-fiber cloths that technicians wedge between the shuttle's heat-resistant tiles during preparations for flight. Maintaining a smooth surface on the orbiter's belly is important to prevent overheating during the ship's fiery plunge home through Earth's atmosphere.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 8, 2007
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The shuttle Discovery glided to a safe landing here yesterday, bringing to a close one of the more eventful shuttle missions in the history of the shuttle program. Commander Pamela A. Melroy fired the shuttle's braking rockets just before noon, beginning the return from orbit. The shuttle flew over North America from the northwest to the southeast, coming in to a landing on the 15,000-foot landing strip about 1 p.m. The mission started out as a pivotal moment in space station construction, tightly packed with goals that included bringing a new room to the station - the Harmony module - and relocating an enormous solar array and truss from its temporary position atop the station to its permanent location at the left-hand end of the station.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 25, 2004
WASHINGTON - A planned spacewalk ended just minutes after it began last night because of a problem with the oxygen supply to astronaut Mike Fincke's spacesuit. Four minutes after Fincke exited the International Space Station - Russian Gennady Padalka was still inside the airlock - controllers on the ground noticed that the pressure in Fincke's oxygen bottle was falling faster than expected. Controllers told Fincke to go back inside, and although the pair spent more than an hour trying to solve the problem, Russian and NASA officials decided to abort the spacewalk to fix a circuit breaker shortly after 7 p.m. EDT. Neither astronaut was ever in any danger, and officials said they expect to try the spacewalk again, no earlier than Tuesday.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
GREENBELT -- Two shuttle astronauts bolted a new set of six gyroscopes to the Hubble Space Telescope yesterday, repairing the observatory's pointing system and clearing the way for astronomers around the world to resume their exploration of the universe. "This was the main thing they've come to do, and they've done it," said Preston Burch, Hubble operations project manager at the Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt. "I'm sure the scientists have to be terribly thrilled." Astronauts Steve Smith and John Grunsfeld eventually completed all the tasks NASA set for them, including the installation of equipment designed to extend the life of Hubble's aging batteries.
NEWS
By Robyn Shelton and Robyn Shelton,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 3, 2005
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Discovery's astronauts were to make emergency repairs today to the fragile underside of the shuttle, removing dangling pieces of fabric that could pose a danger on its return to Earth. During the spacewalk, astronaut Steve Robinson will try to pull the fabric out by hand. If that fails, he'll use a makeshift hacksaw fashioned out of items found aboard Discovery - a blade, plastic ties, Velcro and duct tape. As a last resort, if the saw doesn't work, he'll use scissors.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 8, 2007
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The shuttle Discovery glided to a safe landing here yesterday, bringing to a close one of the more eventful shuttle missions in the history of the shuttle program. Commander Pamela A. Melroy fired the shuttle's braking rockets just before noon, beginning the return from orbit. The shuttle flew over North America from the northwest to the southeast, coming in to a landing on the 15,000-foot landing strip about 1 p.m. The mission started out as a pivotal moment in space station construction, tightly packed with goals that included bringing a new room to the station - the Harmony module - and relocating an enormous solar array and truss from its temporary position atop the station to its permanent location at the left-hand end of the station.
NEWS
By Luther Young | March 31, 1991
The first space shuttle flight of the year, scheduled to lift off Friday at 9:18 a.m., features the first U.S. spacewalk since 1985 and deployment of a $600 million astronomy satellite designed to probe the invisible universe of high-energy radiation sources.At 35,000 pounds, the Gamma Ray Observatory is the heaviest civilian satellite ever launched by a shuttle and the second of NASA's four "great observatories" planned for this decade. The first was the Hubble Space Telescope, placed in orbit in April 1990.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Sun Staff Writer | August 13, 1995
The name of Cmdr. Pierre J. Thuot, the former astronaut who will teach aerodynamics and naval weapons systems at the Naval Academy, was misspelled in Sunday's Anne Arundel edition of The Sun.The Sun regrets the error.After wrestling with satellites in space, Cmdr. Pierre J. Thuot has found his next challenge in a Naval Academy classroom.Commander Thuot, 40, who has logged 654 hours in space during three shuttle missions, will be teaching midshipmen aerodynamics and naval weapons systems for the next three years.
NEWS
By Jia-Rui Chong and Jia-Rui Chong,Los Angeles Times | November 4, 2007
Astronauts successfully stitched together tears in a sheet of solar panels on the International Space Station early yesterday morning in a seven-hour operation that was one of the most difficult ever attempted in space. Spacewalker Scott E. Parazynski snipped a guide wire that had snagged on the long, wing-like solar array and another wire that had gotten tangled in the damaged area. He also laced five makeshift braces made of aluminum, wire and insulating tape - dubbed "cuff links" by the crew - into the panels to stabilize them.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 27, 2007
HOUSTON -- Astronauts added a room to the International Space Station yesterday morning, working outside the station and inside to move the Harmony module, which will serve as a connection point for two new laboratories in the station, to a temporary location on the side of the station. The space station's robot arm, operated by Stephanie Wilson and Daniel Tani, smoothly moved the 16-ton module out of the shuttle and onto the station, where automatic bolts secured it in a temporary home to the side of the station's living quarters.
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 24, 2007
The shuttle Discovery rocketed into space yesterday, carrying a crew of seven on a challenging two-week mission to continue construction of the International Space Station. The flight includes five spacewalks, the largest number of any shuttle mission. Discovery blasted off from Cape Canaveral in Florida at 11:38 a.m. on an eight-minute jump to space that carried the shuttle from a standing start to a speed of more than 17,000 mph. Discovery's engines guzzled fuel equivalent to emptying a backyard swimming pool every 23 seconds.
NEWS
By Christopher Sherman and Christopher Sherman,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 13, 2007
HOUSTON -- NASA may have to send astronauts on a special spacewalking mission to mend a 3 1/2 -inch gouge on the shuttle Endeavor's belly that appears to penetrate all the way through two heat shield tiles that protect the orbiter. Images gathered by lasers and cameras on an extension to the shuttle's robotic arm confirmed yesterday that the divot went through the 1.12-inch thick tile, exposing some of the heat-resistant material below. That material, as well as the tile itself, is designed to protect the orbiter from burning up during re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 1, 2007
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Two NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station ventured outside for more than seven hours yesterday to turn on the orbital lab's permanent cooling system. Spacewalkers Michael Lopez-Alegria and Sunita Williams disconnected an interim setup that supported the station during its first phase of construction. Then they reattached fluid lines and electrical cables to one of two coolant systems that will service the outpost for its remaining life. The other will be switched over during a spacewalk scheduled for Sunday.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 12, 2006
HOUSTON -- Two of the shuttle Atlantis' astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station this morning to begin activating a $372 million set of power-producing solar arrays. The critical spacewalk is the first of two planned to install the arrays, the primary goal of the shuttle's 11-day flight. The solar panels are part of a 35,000-pound truss that eventually will double the station's power supply. Astronauts Joe Tanner and Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper are scheduled to exit the outpost's airlock at 5:15 a.m. and work outside the space station for about 6 1/2 hours.
NEWS
By MICHAEL CABBAGE and MICHAEL CABBAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2006
HOUSTON -- Two astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station today to dangle from the end of a 100-foot pole that could be used to make repairs to the heat shield of the space shuttle Discovery, which is docked to the station. Piers Sellers and Mike Fossum are scheduled to begin their planned 6 1/2 -hour excursion outside the spacecraft, which is docked to the International Space Station, about 9:15 a.m. In addition to performing maintenance on the station, the astronauts will conduct a test by alternately standing in foot restraints at the end of a boom held by shuttle Discovery's robotic arm. The boom and the arm are each 50 feet long.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 2, 2007
The governor of Maryland recently brought to mind the majestic though scary sight of astronauts floating outside their spacecraft, endeavoring to make repairs. Walks in space are usually successful, but the peril is inescapable, along with the questions: Does he have the right tools? Will the tethering umbilical hold? Can the work be done in one walk, or will another be needed? Will the support crew do its job? Maryland's ship of state had soared into the remoteness of deficit spending before Gov. Martin O'Malley arrived in Annapolis.
NEWS
By JOHN JOHNSON JR. and JOHN JOHNSON JR.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 11, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- Two astronauts from the shuttle Discovery completed a nearly seven-hour spacewalk yesterday, installing new equipment and completing crucial maintenance work to the International Space Station that clears the way for NASA to resume construction of the station late this summer. Astronauts Piers Sellers and Michael E. Fossum attached a heating system pump and did maintenance work on a mobile transport system used to move large equipment and construction materials around the outside of the station.
NEWS
By MICHAEL CABBAGE and MICHAEL CABBAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2006
HOUSTON -- Two astronauts will venture outside the International Space Station today to dangle from the end of a 100-foot pole that could be used to make repairs to the heat shield of the space shuttle Discovery, which is docked to the station. Piers Sellers and Mike Fossum are scheduled to begin their planned 6 1/2 -hour excursion outside the spacecraft, which is docked to the International Space Station, about 9:15 a.m. In addition to performing maintenance on the station, the astronauts will conduct a test by alternately standing in foot restraints at the end of a boom held by shuttle Discovery's robotic arm. The boom and the arm are each 50 feet long.
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