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NEWS
By Greg Autry | October 8, 2004
CALIFORNIA'S HIGH desert blue sky suddenly is sliced in half by a brilliant streak of white as Burt Rutan's SpaceShipOne shoots silently upward through the sound barrier and into space, capturing the $10 million Ansari X prize for his team at Scaled Composites. An eclectic mix of engineers, entrepreneurs, space enthusiasts and the eccentric wealthy gaze up from Earth to contemplate the significance of this bold stroke. In the days that follow, the broader business community and the federal government would be wise to do the same.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Maryland officials should get more economic bang from the Wallops Flight Facility — just over the line in Virginia — by capitalizing on space tourism and the potential from unmanned aircraft, according to a new study. The report, commissioned by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, said the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's complex on Wallops Island already has an effect on Maryland's Eastern Shore. But there's potential for more. One possibility: attracting more people to see rockets blasted into space from Wallops.
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NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - They still want to go. Ten days after the space shuttle Columbia was lost and the seven astronauts on board were killed, space industry entrepreneurs pledged this week to forge ahead with their mission - to turn a buck by sending ordinary people into space. Ordinary in this case means people who might not be astronauts or members of the military but who are instead very, very rich. It costs at least $15 million to vacation in space these days - and there are few takers at that price.
NEWS
By Ajay P. Kothari | June 24, 2012
Is there anything that the U.S. technology community, with an assist from the federal government, can do that would simultaneously achieve the following: a) help hone our economic edge to help us prosper a bit more over a long term; b) maintain and improve upon the technological advantage we have with the rest of the world in space and aeronautics; c) help us on the military side; and d) maintain, retain and sharpen the technological minds of some of our smartest citizens? Such a thing does exist, but a case for it has not been made - because it was not possible to make it until now. Earlier this month, a private company, SpaceX, successfully launched an American-built rocket vehicle system, docked with the International Space Station, and returned successfully to Earth with an intent and hope of commercializing orbital access.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Maryland officials should get more economic bang from the Wallops Flight Facility — just over the line in Virginia — by capitalizing on space tourism and the potential from unmanned aircraft, according to a new study. The report, commissioned by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, said the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's complex on Wallops Island already has an effect on Maryland's Eastern Shore. But there's potential for more. One possibility: attracting more people to see rockets blasted into space from Wallops.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | November 23, 1997
SEATTLE -- If you believe the glossy brochures, slick drawings and peppy sales talk, you'll soon see that any old Joe can float weightlessly like an astronaut by jumping into a rocket-powered cruiser that will gently return its passengers to Earth.If you believe. Some people do.Seattle-based Zegrahm Space Voyages began collecting $9,000 deposits last week -- a dozen so far -- from people who think the adventure-travel company can make good on its promise of space flights for ordinary people by 2001.
NEWS
June 23, 2004
A FEW DAYS ago in suburban Baltimore, a 15-year-old already deep in summer torpor was momentarily roused from the couch by a TV news report of plans for the first privately funded manned space flight. "I'm going to do that some day," she proclaimed with sudden energy and enthusiasm. More power to her, and more power to the designers and backers of SpaceShipOne and its pilot, Michael W. Melvill, for its record-setting flight more than 62 miles above the Earth's surface, roughly the beginning of space.
NEWS
By Ajay P. Kothari | June 24, 2012
Is there anything that the U.S. technology community, with an assist from the federal government, can do that would simultaneously achieve the following: a) help hone our economic edge to help us prosper a bit more over a long term; b) maintain and improve upon the technological advantage we have with the rest of the world in space and aeronautics; c) help us on the military side; and d) maintain, retain and sharpen the technological minds of some of our smartest citizens? Such a thing does exist, but a case for it has not been made - because it was not possible to make it until now. Earlier this month, a private company, SpaceX, successfully launched an American-built rocket vehicle system, docked with the International Space Station, and returned successfully to Earth with an intent and hope of commercializing orbital access.
TOPIC
By J. Scott Orr | August 5, 2001
Man has been in outer space for 40 years. The first American woman went up 18 years ago. So far, NASA insists, there has been no carnal docking aboard any of its missions. Sure, there were rumors when a married couple flew aboard a space shuttle mission in 1992, but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration says two tiny fish are the only couple to experience the joys of sex in true weightlessness. That could soon change. Space tourism, now a reality after American businessman Dennis Tito spent $20 million for a trip aboard a Russian spacecraft to the orbiting International Space Station, has caused the question of sex in space to be viewed with a bit more gravity.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 2, 2001
Hizzoner is right. What this town needs is no rat catchers and more deputy mayors. Space tourism will not be authentic until you can buy T-shirts and leave candy wrappers there. Richard Antonio Moore pleaded guilty, taking life in prison, to avoid execution. That's the death penalty for once working as intended. The point is not to have a missile shield that works, but to be able to say we will.
NEWS
By Greg Autry | October 8, 2004
CALIFORNIA'S HIGH desert blue sky suddenly is sliced in half by a brilliant streak of white as Burt Rutan's SpaceShipOne shoots silently upward through the sound barrier and into space, capturing the $10 million Ansari X prize for his team at Scaled Composites. An eclectic mix of engineers, entrepreneurs, space enthusiasts and the eccentric wealthy gaze up from Earth to contemplate the significance of this bold stroke. In the days that follow, the broader business community and the federal government would be wise to do the same.
NEWS
June 23, 2004
A FEW DAYS ago in suburban Baltimore, a 15-year-old already deep in summer torpor was momentarily roused from the couch by a TV news report of plans for the first privately funded manned space flight. "I'm going to do that some day," she proclaimed with sudden energy and enthusiasm. More power to her, and more power to the designers and backers of SpaceShipOne and its pilot, Michael W. Melvill, for its record-setting flight more than 62 miles above the Earth's surface, roughly the beginning of space.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - They still want to go. Ten days after the space shuttle Columbia was lost and the seven astronauts on board were killed, space industry entrepreneurs pledged this week to forge ahead with their mission - to turn a buck by sending ordinary people into space. Ordinary in this case means people who might not be astronauts or members of the military but who are instead very, very rich. It costs at least $15 million to vacation in space these days - and there are few takers at that price.
TOPIC
By J. Scott Orr | August 5, 2001
Man has been in outer space for 40 years. The first American woman went up 18 years ago. So far, NASA insists, there has been no carnal docking aboard any of its missions. Sure, there were rumors when a married couple flew aboard a space shuttle mission in 1992, but the National Aeronautics and Space Administration says two tiny fish are the only couple to experience the joys of sex in true weightlessness. That could soon change. Space tourism, now a reality after American businessman Dennis Tito spent $20 million for a trip aboard a Russian spacecraft to the orbiting International Space Station, has caused the question of sex in space to be viewed with a bit more gravity.
NEWS
By SEATTLE TIMES | November 23, 1997
SEATTLE -- If you believe the glossy brochures, slick drawings and peppy sales talk, you'll soon see that any old Joe can float weightlessly like an astronaut by jumping into a rocket-powered cruiser that will gently return its passengers to Earth.If you believe. Some people do.Seattle-based Zegrahm Space Voyages began collecting $9,000 deposits last week -- a dozen so far -- from people who think the adventure-travel company can make good on its promise of space flights for ordinary people by 2001.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
When a Virgin Galactic plane designed for space tourism eventually launches, a Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory experiment studying magnetic activity will be on board. The lab's Electronic Field Measurements instrument will be among a dozen experiments that will enter what is known as the "suborbital" region, about 50 miles above Earth's surface, in a NASA-funded mission. A date has not yet been announced for the flight of Virgin's SpaceShipTwo spacecraft. The experiment seeks to study electromagnetic conditions inside the spacecraft to determine what magnetic fields the craft generates itself, independent of Earth's magnetic field.
NEWS
November 28, 2006
Barring a human or natural mishap, the scheduled Dec. 11 launch of a Minotaur I rocket from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility inches closer to blastoff today when the four-stage vehicle is placed on its Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport pad at the southern end of the little island below Chincoteague. It's a small nudge for a satellite, but it's a huge leap for the Delmarva Peninsula. Until recently, the little-known MARS program has remained off most people's radars, particularly in Maryland.
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