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January 5, 2010
John M. Grunsfeld, a former NASA astronaut who logged more than 58 hours on spacewalks during three missions to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, has been named deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. Grunsfeld, who holds a doctorate in physics and specializes in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and high-energy cosmic ray studies. In a statement, he called his new job "an incredibly exciting opportunity for me to work at a focal point of top astronomers at the leading edge of scientific inquiry."
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Learn more about Comet ISON and other visitors to the solar system from the experts who study it right in our backyard. The Space Telescope Science Institute is holding a monthly lecture Tuesday, this time from astrophysicist Frank Summers, titled “Great Comets from Humble Origins & Eyes on ISON.” You can also get a chance to peer into the heavens from the institute's observatory. The event is free and starts at 8 p.m. in the institute's auditorium at 3700 San Martin Drive.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 2, 2012
A monthly chance to learn from scientists who study the heavens at the Space Telescope Science Institute takes place tomorrow. The institute, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University at 3700 San Martin Drive, is hosting its regular lecture event at 8 p.m. Scientist Marcel Haas will give a lecture titled “ Growing Galaxies in Supercomputers .” If you can't make it, the Bloomberg telescope is also open to the public Friday evenings,...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
A monthly astronomy lecture at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute on Tuesday will delve into Saturn's active outermost ring, known as its F Ring. The institute's Bonnie Meinke will deliver a lecture titled, "Saturn's Intricate F Ring and the Small Moons that Perturb It. " Data from NASA's Cassini mission, which has been exploring Saturn since 2004, has shown the ring to be constantly changing. Scientists believe that may be because of what are known as "shepherd" moons that orbit within or around rings like Saturn's.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | December 17, 2009
A California scientist using the Hubble Space Telescope has discovered the smallest object ever seen in the Kuiper Belt - the vast region of icy objects beyond the orbit of Neptune. The unnamed object is estimated to be 3,200 feet in diameter - just over a half-mile. Hubble detected it from 4.2 billion miles. The next-smallest known Kuiper Belt object is 30 miles in diameter. CalTech astronomer Hilke Schlichting and her team found the tiny object by scouring 4 1/2 years of data from Hubble's Fine Guidance Sensor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 17, 2009
A California scientist using the Hubble Space Telescope has discovered the smallest object ever seen in the Kuiper Belt - the vast region of icy objects beyond the orbit of Neptune. The unnamed object is estimated to be 3,200 feet in diameter - just over a half-mile. Hubble detected it from 4.2 billion miles. The next-smallest known Kuiper Belt object is 30 miles in diameter. CalTech astronomer Hilke Schlichting and her team found the tiny object by scouring 4 1/2 years of data from Hubble's Fine Guidance Sensor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
The Baltimore astrophysicist credited with discovering "dark energy," the mysterious force believed to be accelerating the expansion of the universe, says he has used the Hubble Space Telescope to disprove a competing explanation for the phenomenon. Adam Riess, of the Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, says his team, using Hubble's new Wide Field Camera 3, was able to look at more stars, in both visible and infrared wavelengths. That eliminated errors introduced in previous work, which compared measurements from Hubble and other telescopes.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
Former astronaut joins Space Telescope Science Institute 3 John M. Grunsfeld, a former NASA astronaut who logged more than 58 hours on spacewalks during three missions to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, has been named deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. Grunsfeld, who holds a doctorate in physics and specializes in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and high-energy cosmic ray studies. In a statement, he called his new job "an incredibly exciting opportunity for me to work at a focal point of top astronomers at the leading edge of scientific inquiry."
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2011
When science center directors from around the country gather in Baltimore this month for their annual conference, they'll be able to see one of the largest scientific instruments ever made: a full-scale mock-up of the James Webb Space Telescope. Northrop Grumman, the prime contractor working to assemble the $8.7 billion Webb telescope, plans to erect a four-story-high replica of it as a free public attraction along the promenade outside the Maryland Science Center . Planned as a replacement for the 21-year-old Hubble Space Telescope, the Webb project has been described as the "space observatory of the next decade" - larger and far more powerful than the Hubble.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Description: NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has detected a supernova that exploded more than 10 billion years ago, the most distant of its kind ever spotted. It was 4 percent farther away and 350 million years older than the previous record-holder, a supernova found three months ago by a team at the U.S. Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Researchers: David O. Jones of the Johns Hopkins University was the lead author on a paper detailing the discovery.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Half a century ago, a nearby cluster of stars appeared to astronomers as a single glowing ball of gas. As recently as 15 years ago, scientists realized it was in fact a cluster of stars but were convinced they all must have formed at the same time and with the same composition. Now astronomers at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute have found evidence that one cluster may actually be two, one a million years older than the other, in the process of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light years from Earth in an area known as the Tarantula Nebula.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | April 2, 2012
A monthly chance to learn from scientists who study the heavens at the Space Telescope Science Institute takes place tomorrow. The institute, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University at 3700 San Martin Drive, is hosting its regular lecture event at 8 p.m. Scientist Marcel Haas will give a lecture titled “ Growing Galaxies in Supercomputers .” If you can't make it, the Bloomberg telescope is also open to the public Friday evenings,...
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2011
When science center directors from around the country gather in Baltimore this month for their annual conference, they'll be able to see one of the largest scientific instruments ever made: a full-scale mock-up of the James Webb Space Telescope. Northrop Grumman, the prime contractor working to assemble the $8.7 billion Webb telescope, plans to erect a four-story-high replica of it as a free public attraction along the promenade outside the Maryland Science Center . Planned as a replacement for the 21-year-old Hubble Space Telescope, the Webb project has been described as the "space observatory of the next decade" - larger and far more powerful than the Hubble.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2011
The Baltimore astrophysicist credited with discovering "dark energy," the mysterious force believed to be accelerating the expansion of the universe, says he has used the Hubble Space Telescope to disprove a competing explanation for the phenomenon. Adam Riess, of the Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, says his team, using Hubble's new Wide Field Camera 3, was able to look at more stars, in both visible and infrared wavelengths. That eliminated errors introduced in previous work, which compared measurements from Hubble and other telescopes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow | michael.sragow@baltsun.com and Sun Movie Critic | April 7, 2010
"Hubble 3D," a celebration of the orbiting space telescope and the NASA crew that gave it new life last year, provides a glimpse of how star systems looked a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. It reveals the borders of the visible universe. It drinks in the spectacle of celestial bodies born in fiery pillars of clouds. The content is scientific. The imagery gets biblical. In fact, after Baltimore-based astronaut John Grunsfeld witnessed a positive power check on a Hubble camera he'd installed, he said, "Let there be light."
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Learn more about Comet ISON and other visitors to the solar system from the experts who study it right in our backyard. The Space Telescope Science Institute is holding a monthly lecture Tuesday, this time from astrophysicist Frank Summers, titled “Great Comets from Humble Origins & Eyes on ISON.” You can also get a chance to peer into the heavens from the institute's observatory. The event is free and starts at 8 p.m. in the institute's auditorium at 3700 San Martin Drive.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
A monthly astronomy lecture at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute on Tuesday will delve into Saturn's active outermost ring, known as its F Ring. The institute's Bonnie Meinke will deliver a lecture titled, "Saturn's Intricate F Ring and the Small Moons that Perturb It. " Data from NASA's Cassini mission, which has been exploring Saturn since 2004, has shown the ring to be constantly changing. Scientists believe that may be because of what are known as "shepherd" moons that orbit within or around rings like Saturn's.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | March 26, 2010
With time running out for the Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers in Baltimore and around the world are gearing up for the biggest research project ever mounted on the orbiting observatory. Later this year, astronomers from dozens of institutions will begin gathering images of more than 250,000 of the most distant galaxies in the universe. They will seek answers to some of astronomy's biggest questions - queries that go to the origins of the universe itself. There is a sense of urgency to the effort.
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