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By Scott Dance | May 16, 2012
Have questions about space and the James Webb Space Telescope? John Mather, a Nobel laureate and scientist working on the telescope, will answer them on Twitter tomorrow. The telescope is slated for a 2018 launch and is seeking to find the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang, determine how they have evolved, observe star formation and investigate potential for life in other planetary systems. Tweet with the hashtag #JWSTscience and follow @NASAWebbTelescp for answers from 2-3 p.m.
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | January 14, 1992
When the powerful new Hubble Space Telescope was launched in 1990, astronomers predicted that it would upset a lot of theoretical apple carts on its way to new discoveries.Three new reports from Hubble astronomers, including one described as "revolutionary," have proven those forecasts correct.The discoveries are challenging previous theories relating to gravitational "lenses," intergalactic hydrogen clouds and the chemistry of the early universe. Hubble's contributions to the debate were discussed yesterday at the 179th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center last month, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and space agency Administrator Charles Bolden stressed the importance of maintaining budget support for the James Webb Space Telescope, keeping it on track for a 2018 launch. Sticking to that schedule is the job of the Webb telescope's project manager, Bill Ochs, who, from his office on the Greenbelt campus, oversees all of the moving parts slated to come together and be blasted into space in 41/2 years. It's a complicated job, Ochs acknowledged, but since new development and spending plans were approved three years ago for the delayed and over-budget project, things have been running smoothly.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | December 3, 1993
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a flawless pre-dawn launch that rumbled like thunderous timpani, the Shuttle Endeavour hurtled early today toward its much anticipated rendezvous with the Hubble Space Telescope and the start of an arduous and complex repair mission.The seven-member crew spent much of yesterday firing up Endeavour's engines to reach the 48-foot-long observatory at the appointed hour and orbit. The shuttle is expected to intercept Hubble tomorrow morning when it is more than 360 miles above the earth.
NEWS
By Michael Cabbage and Michael Cabbage,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 22, 2007
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In a first, a NASA space telescope has identified molecules in the atmospheres of alien worlds outside our solar system. Recent observations indicate that two giant gas planets trillions of miles away are cloudier and drier than theorists had predicted. However, just as important as the unprecedented scientific data is the potential the discovery holds for eventually finding life on distant Earth-like bodies. "These results are a very important steppingstone for our ultimate goal of characterizing planets around other stars where life could exist," said Mark Swain, a scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | November 13, 2004
James Fraher, an engineer and retired Hubble Space Telescope manager, died of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, Sunday at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Towson resident was 75. Born in New York City, he moved at age 6 to Abbeyside, Ireland, the place of his parents' birth. He attended a Christian Brothers school and learned to speak Gaelic fluently. He was active in Boy Scouting, attaining the rank of Eagle and organizing a village gang called the Black Flash.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1992
Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope say they have made a significant advance toward confirming the existence of black holes -- massively heavy, super-condensed galactic centers that are so strong that even light cannot travel fast enough to escape their pull.The Hubble findings, announced in Washington yesterday, also show that black holes may be more common than was formerly believed.A black hole, by its very nature, cannot be seen. But the Hubble images show that stars in a nearby galaxy, M32, become extremely concentrated toward the center.
NEWS
By The Hartford Courant | November 26, 1990
Blame for the flawed Hubble space telescope must be shared by NASA because engineers were discouraged from reporting problems, an agency investigation has concluded."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | January 13, 1992
When it was launched in 1990, astronomers predicted that the powerful new Hubble Space Telescope would upset a lot of theoretical apple carts on its way to new discoveries.Three new reports from Hubble astronomers, including one described as "revolutionary," have proven those forecasts correct.The discoveries are challenging previous theories relating to gravitational "lenses," intergalactic hydrogen clouds and the chemistry of the early universe. Hubble's contributions to the debate were being discussed today before the 179th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Atlanta.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Learn more about Comet ISON and other visitors to the solar system from the experts who study it right in our backyard. The Space Telescope Science Institute is holding a monthly lecture Tuesday, this time from astrophysicist Frank Summers, titled “Great Comets from Humble Origins & Eyes on ISON.” You can also get a chance to peer into the heavens from the institute's observatory. The event is free and starts at 8 p.m. in the institute's auditorium at 3700 San Martin Drive.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them - and encourages others to do so, as well. For two years, Kalirai, an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history. Now he is the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful. "Astronomy is my passion, and the James Webb Space Telescope is the most exciting astronomy project ever," said Kalirai, 35, of Ellicott City.
NEWS
By Pete Pichaske, pete.pichaske@gmail.com | April 26, 2013
Jason Kalirai doesn't just reach for the stars. He pulls them close and studies them — and encourages others to do so as well. Kalirai, 35, is an award-winning astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. For two years, he worked with the Hubble Space Telescope, the most powerful telescope in history, and for the past 2 1/2 years has been the deputy project scientist developing Hubble's successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, which will be 100 times more powerful than Hubble.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2012
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured distant reaches of the universe over the past 22 years, but with the end of the space shuttle program, has not been repaired since 2009. A filmmaker is challenging that decision with the documentary "Saving Hubble" and will speak in Baltimore on Tuesday. David Gaynes will speak at the Space Telescope Science Institute with his message about saving Hubble, which is expected to continue operating only through next year. NASA is focused on replacing Hubble with the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Half a century ago, a nearby cluster of stars appeared to astronomers as a single glowing ball of gas. As recently as 15 years ago, scientists realized it was in fact a cluster of stars but were convinced they all must have formed at the same time and with the same composition. Now astronomers at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute have found evidence that one cluster may actually be two, one a million years older than the other, in the process of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light years from Earth in an area known as the Tarantula Nebula.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | July 24, 2012
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is holding a family event Wednesday night to teach middle-school-age children about the James Webb Space Telescope. Visitors will learn about the telescope from experts who work on it, and then will be able to build a simple telescope they can take home. The event is from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Goddard visitors center in Greenbelt. The Webb telescope is slated to launch around 2018.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Frank D. RoylanceEvening Sun Staff | May 20, 1991
The Astro space telescope, which seemed doomed by budget cuts, will be revived and scheduled for a second space shuttle flight, officials said today.Sen. Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., said NASA's budget was "scrubbed down" to find the money to keep the program alive in the form of an Astro-2 mission expected to cost $30 million.Astro was designed to explore some of the hottest and most violent regions of space, which generate radiation in the X-ray and ultraviolet wavelengths that cannot be observed from the ground.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
Five days of work on the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope should end Tuesday morning with the release of what one astronomer said is "in many ways ... a brand new telescope." "At this point, Hubble actually has the largest complement of functioning instruments it has ever had" since its launch in 1990, said Mario Livio, senior scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. "This is going to be an observatory that is just so much more powerful and more promising." The crew of the shuttle Atlantis was to release the telescope just before 9 a.m. Tuesday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | May 16, 2012
Have questions about space and the James Webb Space Telescope? John Mather, a Nobel laureate and scientist working on the telescope, will answer them on Twitter tomorrow. The telescope is slated for a 2018 launch and is seeking to find the first galaxies formed after the Big Bang, determine how they have evolved, observe star formation and investigate potential for life in other planetary systems. Tweet with the hashtag #JWSTscience and follow @NASAWebbTelescp for answers from 2-3 p.m.
NEWS
October 4, 2011
Tuesday's announcement that Hopkins astronomer Adam G. Riess will share this year's Nobel Prize in physics acknowledges his huge contribution to scientific knowledge. From the study of giant exploding stars millions of light-years from Earth, Mr. Riess and his colleagues, Saul Perlmutter of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California and Brian P. Schmidt of the Australian National University in Australia, deduced the astonishing hypothesis that our universe is being violently blown apart by an immensely powerful, previously unsuspected force.
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