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By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
NASA invented robot cables to help the joints in various space structures move more smoothly. An Annapolis company used those same cables to make walkers for the disabled and elderly easier to move without lifting them off the ground. Yesterday, NASA consultants from the Massachusetts-based Center for Technology Commercialization Inc. used the Annapolis company and several others to show some of Baltimore's entrepreneurs how they could transfer space technology to their small businesses.
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NEWS
December 11, 2013
Should we trust the Iranian government? No - nor should we totally trust any other government. I always remember President Reagan's statement about Russia when he said "trust but verify" ( "The nuclear deal with Iran," Nov. 25). I was born in Iran and lived there until I was 18 years old. I moved to the U.S. in 1978, and I have been an American citizen since 1987. Should the current Iranian government be allowed to possess nuclear bombs? Should we abandon our ally Israel?
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NEWS
April 13, 1993
In a fascinating follow-up to the Clinton-Yeltsin summit, the White House has ordered NASA to work with Russian scientists in an effort to save the controversial Space Station Freedom from death by cost-overrun.The ambitious project, carrying a price tag in the $30 billion to $40 billion range, plus $100 billion in operating expenses over 30 years, is now going through a painful downsizing redesign. Whether the effort will succeed may, indeed, require tapping into Russia's vaunted space technology.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley called on the federal government Monday to sustain funding for aerospace research, calling the state's growing industry a critical part of the Maryland's "innovation economy. " During a tour of ATK Space Systems Division in Beltsville, the governor said it was the state's responsibility to make sure such companies have "a pipeline of skilled employees" but that the future of space technology depends on the federal government's commitment to the industry.  O'Malley called on Congress to avoid "applying the sort of mindless meat cleaver of sequestration cuts" which have been already forced Department of Defense employees onto furloughs.
NEWS
August 9, 1993
The Clinton administration's success in forcing cancellation of Russian rocket sales to India relieves the most serious security dispute between Washington and Moscow since the breakup of the Soviet Union and brightens prospects for their greater cooperation in curbing the spread of nuclear weaponry. When combined with signs of progress in U.S. nuclear disputes with Iraq and North Korea, the case for tough use of American pressure grows ever stronger.To determine just how far the Russians had to backtrack, consider this statement by Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin during a visit to India last January: "When two great countries, in this case India and Russia, sign an agreement, it is not businesslike or proper to breach that agreement.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley called on the federal government Monday to sustain funding for aerospace research, calling the state's growing industry a critical part of the Maryland's "innovation economy. " During a tour of ATK Space Systems Division in Beltsville, the governor said it was the state's responsibility to make sure such companies have "a pipeline of skilled employees" but that the future of space technology depends on the federal government's commitment to the industry.  O'Malley called on Congress to avoid "applying the sort of mindless meat cleaver of sequestration cuts" which have been already forced Department of Defense employees onto furloughs.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1996
Jim Lovell knows the importance of space technology. It got him safely back from a harrowing spin around the moon in 1970 after his Apollo 13 spacecraft was crippled by an oxygen tank explosion.At 6 p.m. today, the former astronaut will appear at the Maryland Science Center to take part in a "Town Hall in Space" -- a discussion of the impact of space technology on Maryland and a chance for people to voice their feelings about the future of U.S. space policy.Among the other panelists will be Joseph Rothenberg, director of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
GREENBELT -- Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center unveiled new satellites yesterday that may represent the future of space science - and they're about the size of your microwave oven. The agency's Space Technology 5 mission will test three micro-satellites designed to measure Earth's magnetic field, track the solar storms that batter it and serve as prototypes for probes that can predict solar hurricanes the way forecasters predict the weather on Earth. It's an increasingly important job in a world that relies on global positioning technology for navigation and communication - systems that can be dangerously disrupted by solar storms.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Tom Bowman and Douglas Birch and Tom Bowman,Staff Writers | March 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Ronald Reagan, who once earned a living pitching detergent on television, tried his hand at selling the former Soviet Union's space technology to NASA yesterday.But NASA Administrator Richard H. Truly said he would, in effect, continue to kick the tires on space vehicles and other hardware being sold or rented by what is now the Commonwealth of Independent States.After appearing at a Senate subcommittee's hearing on NASA's budget, Mr. Truly said he still needs to talk to a team of space agency engineers who are studying whether to use the capsule-style Soyuz spacecraft as a crew rescue vehicle for a proposed U.S. space station.
NEWS
By ALBERT SEHLSTEDT Jr | September 22, 1991
The life-and-death saga of the space station, that annual drama on Capitol Hill which plays to an audience of government officials, aerospace companies and scientific associations, is ringing down the curtain on its final episode for this season.The story line, which during the past decade has moved with the glacial pace of a daytime soap opera, remains familiar. The 1991 script concludes with a fairly happy ending for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which sees the station as a dynamic symbol of the nation's leadership in space technology and as an inspiration for youthful Americans contemplating careers in science and engineering.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | November 19, 2008
WASHINGTON - The incoming Obama administration must stop the legendary struggles between the Pentagon and the CIA over control of intelligence, Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, a key member of the House Intelligence Committee, said yesterday. Ruppersberger, a Baltimore County Democrat, said it would be "a good thing" if Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates stayed on the job after Barack Obama is inaugurated as president Jan. 20. But he declined to say whether he thinks any of the top intelligence agency chiefs should be replaced.
NEWS
By DENNIS O'BRIEN and DENNIS O'BRIEN,SUN REPORTER | November 29, 2005
GREENBELT -- Scientists at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center unveiled new satellites yesterday that may represent the future of space science - and they're about the size of your microwave oven. The agency's Space Technology 5 mission will test three micro-satellites designed to measure Earth's magnetic field, track the solar storms that batter it and serve as prototypes for probes that can predict solar hurricanes the way forecasters predict the weather on Earth. It's an increasingly important job in a world that relies on global positioning technology for navigation and communication - systems that can be dangerously disrupted by solar storms.
NEWS
By Erika Hobbs and Erika Hobbs,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2003
There was a time when Anne Arundel County residents who faced cancer treatment were likely to look first to renowned medical centers in Baltimore or Washington. Now, two of the county's major medical institutions - North Arundel Hospital in Glen Burnie and Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis - have revamped their cancer services to give the community a chance to heal closer to home. At North Arundel, the upgrades have meant creating a cancer center where none existed. At Anne Arundel Medical Center, it is part of the institution's metamorphosis from community hospital to regional leader.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2001
NASA invented robot cables to help the joints in various space structures move more smoothly. An Annapolis company used those same cables to make walkers for the disabled and elderly easier to move without lifting them off the ground. Yesterday, NASA consultants from the Massachusetts-based Center for Technology Commercialization Inc. used the Annapolis company and several others to show some of Baltimore's entrepreneurs how they could transfer space technology to their small businesses.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 1999
WASHINGTON -- When Vice President Al Gore launched a special partnership with Russia's prime minister in 1993, the effort seemed full of promise and a perfect showcase for Gore's high-technology, futuristic vision.Tapping the talents of agency bosses and scientists, the two countries would cooperate on space, energy exploration, even public health -- projects seen as building blocks in a grand strategy of helping Russia discard its Communist past and grow into a free-market democracy.But as Prime Minister Yevgeny M. Primakov arrives this week for the 11th meeting of their joint commission, the original promise has been all but overwhelmed by the problems facing Russia and strains in the relationship.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1998
From new ways of detecting breast cancer to predicting when hurricanes will strike, the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt has developed technology in the name of space exploration that can also be put to use here on Earth.An $800,000 grant from Goddard to the Maryland Economic Development Corp. (MEDCO) will help existing and start-up companies in the Baltimore area access that technology and give them assistance in developing, manufacturing and marketing new uses for it.The grant will go to a MEDCO offshoot, the Emerging Technology Center, a business incubator now under construction in the old American Can Co. in Canton.
NEWS
August 18, 1992
Star in SpaceI read with interest the Associated Press story (Aug. 5) covering the Atlantis hook-up with a satellite in orbit and was both elated and very disappointed.One thing was sadly missing. The project manager of this remarkable accomplishment in space was Donald S. Crouch, born on Kent Island, and graduated from the Stevensville High School and Johns Hopkins University before his steady climb in space technology.I am saddened The Sun has not given recognition to Mr. Crouch for the leading role he had in this outstanding breakthrough in space technology.
NEWS
April 15, 1991
Curran sides with governorThe state attorney general, siding with the governor in a potential dispute with the legislature, has ruled that lawmakers cannot redraw the state's legislative districts without first receiving a redistricting plan proposed by the governor.Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr.'s opinion says the constitution "reserves to the governor the prerogative to take the first step in redistricting." No plan can be adopted until Gov. William Donald Schaefer submits one, Curran said.
BUSINESS
By SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER | May 12, 1997
What can cruise the ocean at better than 13 knots on pontoons bigger than a Trident submarine, is as tall as a 20-story building and can ride out hurricane-force winds without spilling a cup of coffee?It's the Odyssey, a converted North Sea drilling platform that is the centerpiece of a multinational project led by the Boeing Co. to do what's never been done before -- launch satellites into space from the ocean.Next summer, a Russian-Ukrainian rocket is scheduled to blast off from the Odyssey near Christmas Island in the Pacific, sending a new-generation Hughes communication satellite into a stationary orbit 22,300 miles above Earth.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1996
When NASA astronaut Dr. Daniel Barry delivers a speech tonight in Baltimore about the private commercial spinoffs and educational promise of the space program, he'll be preaching to more than a few believers.Among the throng of high-technology company executives gathering at the Greater Baltimore Committee's annual trade show and dinner to kick off its event-oriented High-Tech Month will be Joseph Fuller Jr., a former career employee and engineer for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
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