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Space Shuttle Discovery

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By Luther Young | May 3, 1991
The space shuttle Discovery will streak like a star over Maryland this weekend, making a rare appearance in this area as it circles the Earth farther north than usual on an eight-day "star wars" research mission.If skies are clear just before dawn on both Sunday and Monday, the shuttle will be visible to the naked eye for approximately two minutes as a bright star rising swiftly from low on the horizon to a vanishing point well up in the early morning sky."The shuttle is one of those space marvels you usually only see on television and think of as being so remote," said Jim O'Leary of the Maryland Science Center.
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TRAVEL
By Rachel Martin, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
Washington Space Shuttle Discovery, National Air and Space Museum The space shuttle Discovery soared around the Washington Monument and the White House in a salute to the nation's capital Tuesday before landing for the last time near its new home at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum annex in northern Virginia. Discovery will be transferred from NASA into the museum's collection at the Stephen F. Udvar-Hazy Center on April 19 in an outdoor ceremony open to the public.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 18, 2006
Hey, space cadets! The International Space Station is back in the evening skies, and it will be soaring up the East Coast tonight - this time with the space shuttle Discovery attached. That's 10 space travelers in all - more than pull Santa's sleigh. Look for a bright, steady, star-like object rising above the southwestern horizon at 5:37 p.m. At 5:40 they will be off the Delmarva coast, more than halfway up the southeastern sky as seen from Baltimore. By 5:42 p.m. they all vanish into the Earth's shadow.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
While some folks wish to see their names up in lights, students at Folly Quarter Middle School can boast that their names have gone up in space. The students at the Ellicott City school recently participated in the NASA and Lockheed Martin Student Signatures in Space (S3) program, which allows youngsters to sign posters that are scanned onto a disk and sent into orbit. The students signed the posters last spring, and their signatures were sent up in space in late February via the space shuttle Discovery.
NEWS
January 27, 1992
The Naval Academy Satellite Earth Station is transmitting live television from space and from the Kennedy Space Center during the currentmission of the space shuttle Discovery.The coverage is on the academy's closed circuit television system, but Annapolitans who live within a few miles of the academy may be able to pick up the broadcastwith an outside antenna. Tune in below channel 14 on the UHF band, or use the antenna with cable channel 58.The Naval Academy Radio Club is transmitting the signal using a low-power amateur TV transmitter and the call sign W3ADO.
NEWS
February 9, 1995
Despite problems with a leaky jet thruster on the space shuttle Discovery that complicated its close encounter with the Russian Mir space station, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration proved that it still has the right stuff. American and Russian officials successfully negotiated modifications to the complex orbital ballet between the two spacecraft that kept plans on track for a series of shuttle-Mir dockings later this summer. Those maneuvers will serve as rehearsals for construction of an international space station in 1997.
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2007
NASA managers have extended the mission of space shuttle Discovery by a day so that the orbiting astronauts can take a closer look at a problem discovered during the weekend with the solar arrays powering the International Space Station. The decision yesterday to perform what the space agency is calling "exploratory surgery" was made after spacewalking astronauts from Discovery spotted what appeared to be metal shavings inside a rotational joint that allows the solar panels to track the motion of the sun. "When I opened the panel I saw black dust, like metallic shavings," said astronaut Daniel Tani, during an interview from space.
TRAVEL
By Rachel Martin, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
Washington Space Shuttle Discovery, National Air and Space Museum The space shuttle Discovery soared around the Washington Monument and the White House in a salute to the nation's capital Tuesday before landing for the last time near its new home at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum annex in northern Virginia. Discovery will be transferred from NASA into the museum's collection at the Stephen F. Udvar-Hazy Center on April 19 in an outdoor ceremony open to the public.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2006
Catching a break with the Florida weather yesterday afternoon, the space shuttle Discovery made a perfect sunset landing at Kennedy Space Center. Mission controllers had waved off an earlier landing opportunity because of storms and low clouds, but the weather unexpectedly cleared enough to allow the attempt. Had the weather not cleared at Kennedy, Discovery would most likely have had to land at the White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, the NASA team's third choice for a landing site.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Liz Bowie, Jackie Powder, Joe Nawrozki and Carl Schoettler contributed to this article | October 30, 1998
Three minutes before the blastoff of space shuttle Discovery, Sara Cambias was nervous."I don't want anything to happen to him," said the Sykesville Middle School pupil.In unison, Cambias' classmates shouted the last 10 seconds of yesterday's countdown and then watched 77-year-old John Glenn roar into the stratosphere to become the oldest astronaut ever -- and possibly a new hero to these cheering, clapping eighth-graders."I just think it's pretty interesting that a guy that old would actually be brave enough to go into space," said Kristina Letmate.
NEWS
By John Johnson Jr. and John Johnson Jr.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 2007
NASA managers have extended the mission of space shuttle Discovery by a day so that the orbiting astronauts can take a closer look at a problem discovered during the weekend with the solar arrays powering the International Space Station. The decision yesterday to perform what the space agency is calling "exploratory surgery" was made after spacewalking astronauts from Discovery spotted what appeared to be metal shavings inside a rotational joint that allows the solar panels to track the motion of the sun. "When I opened the panel I saw black dust, like metallic shavings," said astronaut Daniel Tani, during an interview from space.
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,Los Angeles Times | December 23, 2006
Catching a break with the Florida weather yesterday afternoon, the space shuttle Discovery made a perfect sunset landing at Kennedy Space Center. Mission controllers had waved off an earlier landing opportunity because of storms and low clouds, but the weather unexpectedly cleared enough to allow the attempt. Had the weather not cleared at Kennedy, Discovery would most likely have had to land at the White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico, the NASA team's third choice for a landing site.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | December 18, 2006
Hey, space cadets! The International Space Station is back in the evening skies, and it will be soaring up the East Coast tonight - this time with the space shuttle Discovery attached. That's 10 space travelers in all - more than pull Santa's sleigh. Look for a bright, steady, star-like object rising above the southwestern horizon at 5:37 p.m. At 5:40 they will be off the Delmarva coast, more than halfway up the southeastern sky as seen from Baltimore. By 5:42 p.m. they all vanish into the Earth's shadow.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | July 12, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. - NASA sailed through launch preparations yesterday while the crew of the space shuttle Discovery practiced landings and got ready for their planned historic mission this week. Top managers met at the Kennedy Space Center to discuss technical issues but emerged with no immediate showstoppers. Liftoff is scheduled for 3:51 p.m. tomorrow. "We've had a series of discussions over the past several weeks, going over all the risks" involved in a shuttle flight, said Wayne Hale, NASA's deputy shuttle program manager.
TOPIC
July 10, 2005
LOOKING FORWARD MONDAY Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice will be hunting for ways to end the yearlong impasse with North Korea over its nuclear weapons program as she visits four nations in East Asia. China may be the most difficult stop for Rice, given growing disagreements between the two countries on issues including North Korea. Rice is also visiting Thailand, Japan and South Korea. TUESDAY Gov. Janet Napolitano hosts a summit in Flagstaff, Ariz., to devise plans for enforcement of federal immigration laws in Arizona, the busiest illicit entry point on the nation's porous southern border.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 20, 2001
SPACE SHUTTLE Discovery is scheduled to land tomorrow, and among those anxiously awaiting its return is a group of 19 Crofton Elementary School pupils whose scientific experiments have formed part of the shuttle's mission. Last spring, Kathy Depman, a fourth-grade teacher at Crofton, worked with the children in a program designed by county public schools' Gifted and Talented Office in conjunction with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. For two months, they explored the qualities of a successful space scientist and, following NASA guidelines, created experiments to test the effects of microgravity on various products that might be used by astronauts in space.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
As a guinea pig in sleep studies during the space shuttle Discovery's coming flight, John Glenn was prepared to answer questions about his age and his normal sleep habits.But he wasn't going to tell the nosey reporters everything."I won't tell you how many times a night I get up," the 77-year-old space pioneer and U.S. senator said, to gales of laughter. "I don't know that that's any of your business, really."Glenn is a payload specialist on the flight, with fewer logged hours of space travel than all but the flight's one rookie.
TOPIC
July 10, 2005
LOOKING FORWARD MONDAY Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice will be hunting for ways to end the yearlong impasse with North Korea over its nuclear weapons program as she visits four nations in East Asia. China may be the most difficult stop for Rice, given growing disagreements between the two countries on issues including North Korea. Rice is also visiting Thailand, Japan and South Korea. TUESDAY Gov. Janet Napolitano hosts a summit in Flagstaff, Ariz., to devise plans for enforcement of federal immigration laws in Arizona, the busiest illicit entry point on the nation's porous southern border.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Liz Bowie, Jackie Powder, Joe Nawrozki and Carl Schoettler contributed to this article | October 30, 1998
Three minutes before the blastoff of space shuttle Discovery, Sara Cambias was nervous."I don't want anything to happen to him," said the Sykesville Middle School pupil.In unison, Cambias' classmates shouted the last 10 seconds of yesterday's countdown and then watched 77-year-old John Glenn roar into the stratosphere to become the oldest astronaut ever -- and possibly a new hero to these cheering, clapping eighth-graders."I just think it's pretty interesting that a guy that old would actually be brave enough to go into space," said Kristina Letmate.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
As a guinea pig in sleep studies during the space shuttle Discovery's coming flight, John Glenn was prepared to answer questions about his age and his normal sleep habits.But he wasn't going to tell the nosey reporters everything."I won't tell you how many times a night I get up," the 77-year-old space pioneer and U.S. senator said, to gales of laughter. "I don't know that that's any of your business, really."Glenn is a payload specialist on the flight, with fewer logged hours of space travel than all but the flight's one rookie.
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