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NEWS
February 2, 2003
Following is a transcript of remarks made yesterday by President Bush on the space shuttle Columbia disaster: This day has brought terrible news and great sadness to our country. At 9 o'clock this morning, Mission Control in Houston lost contact with our space shuttle Columbia. A short time later, debris was seen falling from the skies above Texas. The Columbia is lost. There are no survivors. On board was a crew of seven: Col. Rick Husband; Lt. Col. Michael Anderson; Cmdr.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
William Bruce Schneck, former manager of space shuttle Columbia's communications network, died June 17 of a massive heart attack at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. The Shady Side resident was 59. The son of a Glenn L. Martin Co. quality control engineer and a Baltimore public school cafeteria manager, Mr. Schneck was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. He was a 1970 graduate of Patapsco High School, and after attending a Baltimore technical school for a year, went to work in 1972 for Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. Mr. Schneck, a contract employee who worked at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt for more than 35 years, retired in 2005.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - Following a scathing report on the lapses that led to the loss of the space shuttle Columbia, Republican and Democratic senators yesterday pressed the NASA administrator to find those responsible for the disaster and hold them accountable. But Sean O'Keefe, chief of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, refused to assign blame during his congressional testimony or in a subsequent news meeting. He disparaged demands for what he called "a public display or a public execution or a firing squad that lines up at noon," even as he asserted that a new management team soon would lead remaining shuttles back to flight.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 2007
Confronted with the same kind of problem that doomed the space shuttle Columbia, NASA officials, chastened by years of criticism and upheaval in the agency, took a markedly different approach during the current mission of Endeavour, calling on an array of new tools and procedures in order to analyze and respond to the problem. While Columbia faced much more serious damage - a 6- to 10-inch-wide hole punched in a leading edge of one of its wings that let in searing gases during re-entry - outside officials said that NASA had taken steps far more elaborate and methodical with Endeavour than those performed during the Columbia flight.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 5, 1990
HUNTSVILLE, Ala. -- Scientists who had been frustrated for two days by control problems with four telescopes aboard the space shuttle Columbia won the upper hand late yesterday and began their historic observations of the universe."
NEWS
July 13, 1992
From one perspective, space shuttle Columbia's 14-day mission might look like small potatoes. Russian cosmonauts have completed 300-day missions aboard the Mir space platform, blazing orbital survival trails and building a data base that could be invaluable for such long-term missions as a joint voyage to Mars. Even the Americans, in the heyday of Skylab, managed an 84-day stay in weightless space, a record in 1974.But there are other perspectives. Columbia, on the 48th U.S. shuttle flight, performed many experiments that ground-based scientists could not even try. Several had to do with AIDS.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - The hole in the space shuttle Columbia's left wing was large enough that a spacewalking astronaut or satellite cameras might have seen it, investigators said yesterday. The size of the breach - thought to be roughly six to 10 inches across - is "absolutely" within the detection capability of the cameras on board military satellites, said retired Adm. Harold Gehman, the head of the independent panel probing the cause of the Feb. 1 accident. Gehman said that as the board moves to finish its report, now expected late next month, its members consider NASA's management failures to be on equal footing with the foam as the cause of the disaster.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 20, 2007
Confronted with the same kind of problem that doomed the space shuttle Columbia, NASA officials, chastened by years of criticism and upheaval in the agency, took a markedly different approach during the current mission of Endeavour, calling on an array of new tools and procedures in order to analyze and respond to the problem. While Columbia faced much more serious damage - a 6- to 10-inch-wide hole punched in a leading edge of one of its wings that let in searing gases during re-entry - outside officials said that NASA had taken steps far more elaborate and methodical with Endeavour than those performed during the Columbia flight.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2003
MOSCOW - Offering a multinational display of bravura, the three-man crew of the Soyuz space capsule met with the news media yesterday and shrugged off the notion that their steep plunge to Earth in a malfunctioning spaceship Sunday was riskier than any other weekend drive. The two U.S. astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut, clad in identical blue coveralls, spent 40 minutes talking about the sweet smell of Kazakstan earth after 5 1/2 months in space, the strangeness of slithering out of their capsule with muscles that had forgotten gravity and the joy of seeing their wives.
NEWS
By Lisa J. Huriash, Christy McKerney and Tanya Weinberg and Lisa J. Huriash, Christy McKerney and Tanya Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 2, 2003
They mourned the dead, prayed for those left behind and struggled with news that seven astronauts had died in a fiery explosion, their final moments televised to horrified witnesses around the world. South Florida religious leaders of all denominations spent yesterday consoling their followers and preparing Sunday services in honor of the space shuttle Columbia and its crew. The events were particularly devastating to local Jewish and Hindu groups who had celebrated the space mission with great pride.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | January 27, 2006
Panspermia is the name scientists give to the notion that life could spread among the planets aboard meteorites - hitchhikers on rocks blasted off one planet and hurled through space until they fall to seed new life on another. One problem with this theory: traveling organisms would have to survive the seemingly lethal heat and impact of their arrival on their new home. The destruction of the space shuttle Columbia three years ago is providing new evidence that life - even fairly complicated life - can survive the searing heat of an uncontrolled fall through the Earth's atmosphere.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - Following a scathing report on the lapses that led to the loss of the space shuttle Columbia, Republican and Democratic senators yesterday pressed the NASA administrator to find those responsible for the disaster and hold them accountable. But Sean O'Keefe, chief of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, refused to assign blame during his congressional testimony or in a subsequent news meeting. He disparaged demands for what he called "a public display or a public execution or a firing squad that lines up at noon," even as he asserted that a new management team soon would lead remaining shuttles back to flight.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 12, 2003
WASHINGTON - The hole in the space shuttle Columbia's left wing was large enough that a spacewalking astronaut or satellite cameras might have seen it, investigators said yesterday. The size of the breach - thought to be roughly six to 10 inches across - is "absolutely" within the detection capability of the cameras on board military satellites, said retired Adm. Harold Gehman, the head of the independent panel probing the cause of the Feb. 1 accident. Gehman said that as the board moves to finish its report, now expected late next month, its members consider NASA's management failures to be on equal footing with the foam as the cause of the disaster.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2003
The space shuttle Columbia was not the first to have superheated gas invade its left wing on re-entering Earth's atmosphere, according to documents released yesterday by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In 2000, the documents show, the shuttle Atlantis went into orbit with a quarter-inch breach in the wing's leading edge, allowing blowtorch-hot plasma into the wing on re-entry. But unlike the accident that destroyed Columbia on Feb. 1 and killed its crew of seven, the incident resulted in only minor damage, leaving the wing's inner structure intact.
TOPIC
May 11, 2003
The World Fearful residents of the Chinese coastal town of Xiande attacked a building where they believed SARS patients were quarantined. The Pentagon released 22 prisoners from the U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo, Cuba. India's prime minister called for "decisive" talks to end the rivalry with Pakistan, whose Foreign Ministry responded by proposing mutual nuclear disarmament which India declined. Two American astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut returning from the international space station in a Soyuz craft landed hundreds of miles short of the intended area in Kazakstan.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2003
MOSCOW - Offering a multinational display of bravura, the three-man crew of the Soyuz space capsule met with the news media yesterday and shrugged off the notion that their steep plunge to Earth in a malfunctioning spaceship Sunday was riskier than any other weekend drive. The two U.S. astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut, clad in identical blue coveralls, spent 40 minutes talking about the sweet smell of Kazakstan earth after 5 1/2 months in space, the strangeness of slithering out of their capsule with muscles that had forgotten gravity and the joy of seeing their wives.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 9, 2003
The space shuttle Columbia was not the first to have superheated gas invade its left wing on re-entering Earth's atmosphere, according to documents released yesterday by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. In 2000, the documents show, the shuttle Atlantis went into orbit with a quarter-inch breach in the wing's leading edge, allowing blowtorch-hot plasma into the wing on re-entry. But unlike the accident that destroyed Columbia on Feb. 1 and killed its crew of seven, the incident resulted in only minor damage, leaving the wing's inner structure intact.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 23, 1991
GREENBELT -- When astronauts arrive home from a mission in space, television cameras show them nimbly walking down the steps from shuttle to runway, looking confident with big smiles on their faces.Then they walk along a line of official welcomers, shaking hands and looking hearty.What the public doesn't see is what the astronauts looked like an hour or two earlier -- a bunch of drunks.Ronald A. Parise, a Maryland astronaut who was on the crew of the space shuttle Columbia for the nine-day Astro-1 mission in December, shared his experiences yesterday with about 60 adults and children at the Goddard Space Flight Center.
NEWS
By Ralph Vartabedian and Ralph Vartabedian,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 2003
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Inside the hangar where NASA has collected wreckage from the space shuttle Columbia, engineers and scientists have put up a banner signed by dozens of school children, who wrote in large block letters, "We honor the crew of the Columbia." Just behind that banner is a special room, where the National Aeronautics and Space Administration allows no visitors. It's where investigators keep the wreckage of the crew compartment and the astronauts' personal items.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - They still want to go. Ten days after the space shuttle Columbia was lost and the seven astronauts on board were killed, space industry entrepreneurs pledged this week to forge ahead with their mission - to turn a buck by sending ordinary people into space. Ordinary in this case means people who might not be astronauts or members of the military but who are instead very, very rich. It costs at least $15 million to vacation in space these days - and there are few takers at that price.
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