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By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2011
While some folks wish to see their names up in lights, students at Folly Quarter Middle School can boast that their names have gone up in space. The students at the Ellicott City school recently participated in the NASA and Lockheed Martin Student Signatures in Space (S3) program, which allows youngsters to sign posters that are scanned onto a disk and sent into orbit. The students signed the posters last spring, and their signatures were sent up in space in late February via the space shuttle Discovery.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Terence T. Finn, a retired NASA executive who boosted the Space Shuttle program and whose passion for military history fueled four books on the subject, died June 27 of a blood platelet disorder. The Eastern Shore resident was 71. Dr. Finn, a New York native, spent his working life in the Washington area as a federal employee, first as a legislative assistant to Sen. Joseph D. Tydings, a Maryland Democrat. Dr. Finn worked on Capitol Hill from 1966 to 1977, in staff positions that included senior counsel for energy, science and space at the Senate Budget Committee.
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NEWS
By Waleed Abdalati and Robert Braun | July 4, 2011
With the final flight of the stalwart space shuttle Atlantis just a few days away, America is beginning an exciting new chapter in human space exploration. This chapter centers on full utilization of the International Space Station, development of multiple, made-in-America capabilities for astronauts and cargo to reach low-Earth orbit, and pursuit of two critical building blocks for our nation's exploration future: a deep space crew vehicle and an evolvable, heavy-lift rocket. Today, we embark on a new knowledge and innovation-driven approach to space science and exploration that will lead us into the new frontiers of deep space.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | October 22, 2013
I recently had a chance to watch the space-themed film "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney. Leaving aside the multitude of technical errors in the film, as someone who has consulted in the space business for a number years, I always welcome it when Hollywood brings much needed attention to human spaceflight and its importance to us as a people and a nation. That said, as the film played, I wondered if others would also find the casting and script as ironic and troubling as I did. While Ms. Bullock works hard to keep her political views private while quite possibly being the most decent and generous person in the film business, Mr. Clooney has never made it a secret that he is an enthusiastic supporter of Barack Obama and the Democratic Party.
NEWS
December 2, 1994
Tom Jones, a two-time Endeavour astronaut, dazzled students at Archbishop Curley High School with pictures from space and a film detailing the space shuttle's takeoff. But his real message during a visit to Baltimore yesterday was that students can accomplish anything if they refuse to give up."The space program turned me down three times before they would even interview me," said Dr. Jones, 39, who holds a doctorate in planetary science. The Essex native attended the Air Force Academy, was accepted into the space program in 1990 and flew two missions in 1994.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
William Bruce Schneck, former manager of space shuttle Columbia's communications network, died June 17 of a massive heart attack at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. The Shady Side resident was 59. The son of a Glenn L. Martin Co. quality control engineer and a Baltimore public school cafeteria manager, Mr. Schneck was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. He was a 1970 graduate of Patapsco High School, and after attending a Baltimore technical school for a year, went to work in 1972 for Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. Mr. Schneck, a contract employee who worked at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt for more than 35 years, retired in 2005.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1996
Could it happen again?Without a doubt, experts agree, though NASA says the likelihood of catastrophe is less today than on that icy morning a decade ago when the space shuttle Challenger, 73 seconds into its flight, erupted in a ball of flame that killed seven people.The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has invested more than $5 billion since the accident to rebuild the nation's fleet of winged spaceships and enhance the safety of hundreds of parts and systems, including the flawed engine and its leaky seal that doomed Challenger.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | January 7, 2007
If you own an older vehicle, such as the space shuttle, you can expect to replace parts more frequently. Note: By the words "space shuttle," I am referring to my 1999 minivan, which has sustained one $2,500 altercation with an eight-point buck, and one $5,000 whack by a driver who failed to look past a snow bank. Since these collisions, the minivan has developed a few unexplained rattles and tremors, yet it continues valiantly on its scheduled missions; hence its nickname. Recently, the space shuttle required a replacement passenger seat belt.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 13, 1992
Richard H. Truly, the former astronaut who brought NASA back from catastrophe after the explosion of the shuttle Challenger, has resigned as head of the space agency after a series of bitter disputes with White House officials over the future of the space program.The retired Navy vice admiral has locked horns repeatedly with the National Space Council, chaired by Vice President Dan Quayle, over NASA's priorities, according to various sources.Mr. Truly met for half an hour with President Bush Monday night and shortly thereafter submitted a brief letter resigning the post he has held for three years.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2003
As NASA continued to investigate the shuttle Columbia's disintegration and ponder the future of the nation's manned space program, Wall Street seemed to draw its own conclusion yesterday and punished stocks of the shuttle's manufacturers - along with virtually any other company that does business in space. Shares of primary space shuttle contractors Boeing Co. and Lockheed Martin Corp. tumbled yesterday, along with those of secondary NASA suppliers including L-3 Communications, Orbital Sciences Corp.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2013
The course is Human Space Flight. The subject for today: analogues - the scenarios found in the world or contrived in the laboratory that NASA uses to simulate work and life aboard a space ship. Naval Academy professor Ken Reightler leads the class of 13 midshipmen through a discussion that traverses Ernest Shackleton's 1914 expedition of the Antarctic, deep-sea exploration and the experiments at Biosphere 2 - and how lessons from each will help astronauts prepare for the first manned mission to Mars.
FEATURES
By Raymond M. Lane, For The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
"I flew a mother and two young daughters, probably 4 and 7 years old, and as we took off I heard this shrieking from the back of the plane," said Lin Caywood, a 12-year pilot. A mother and recent grandmother herself, Caywood thought the kids were upset about the flight, and banked to circle back to Frederick Municipal Airport for a quick landing to calm the hysterical children. "Then I caught a look at them, and they weren't upset," said Caywood, a Baltimore native and graduate of Poolesville High and Hood College.
NEWS
July 27, 2012
I was saddened to learn of astronaut Sally Ride's death ("Ride had the cool to break barriers," July 25). Outer space is infinite, but human life is not. Sixty-one seems too young for this pioneer to leave us. I feel fortunate, blessed and privileged to have lived at a time when men and women traveled into space and explored the moon. However, what I deeply regret is the manner all the astronauts appeared to "hide their light under a bushel. " At a time when we desperately need genuine heroes, role models, adventurers and explorers who take chances in real time, their reluctance to put themselves in the public eye was regrettable.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
William Bruce Schneck, former manager of space shuttle Columbia's communications network, died June 17 of a massive heart attack at Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. The Shady Side resident was 59. The son of a Glenn L. Martin Co. quality control engineer and a Baltimore public school cafeteria manager, Mr. Schneck was born in Baltimore and raised in Dundalk. He was a 1970 graduate of Patapsco High School, and after attending a Baltimore technical school for a year, went to work in 1972 for Honeywell Technology Solutions Inc. Mr. Schneck, a contract employee who worked at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt for more than 35 years, retired in 2005.
NEWS
September 3, 2011
As a child, I remember a coloring book that pictured a "Buck Rogers" rocket that looked like a football with three fins at its base. It was my job to give it life by coloring the rocket blast with yellows, oranges and reds that lifted the craft to stellar flight and imagined adventures. The book was filled with such renderings and each page held a new mission to be wondered at. Years later came Alan Shepard, Walter "Wally" Shirra Jr., John Glenn Jr., and tragically Virgil "Gus" Grissom who later died in an Apollo 1 pre-launch test.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
In an age of austerity, can the United States still afford, in "Star Trek's" memorable phrase, "to boldly go where no man has gone before"? The answer: maybe. The space shuttle program - that long-running, always slightly disappointing successor to the thrilling Apollo moon missions - is no more. The Obama administration has made it plain that the future of human spaceflight, at least in the near term, will consist of federal partnerships with private enterprise. Entrepreneurs (that is, those whose bottom line is not to advance scientific discovery but to make a buck)
NEWS
August 8, 2011
In an age of austerity, can the United States still afford, in "Star Trek's" memorable phrase, "to boldly go where no man has gone before"? The answer: maybe. The space shuttle program - that long-running, always slightly disappointing successor to the thrilling Apollo moon missions - is no more. The Obama administration has made it plain that the future of human spaceflight, at least in the near term, will consist of federal partnerships with private enterprise. Entrepreneurs (that is, those whose bottom line is not to advance scientific discovery but to make a buck)
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2001
Thirteen-year-old Eric Miles had a single question yesterday for the astronauts who blasted off from Earth a week ago on board the space shuttle Atlantis. "How do we know that you're really in space and not in a movie studio?" he wondered. It didn't take much to convince him and 19 other Baltimore middle-schoolers who participated in a live teleconference with the astronauts as their spacecraft flew more than 200 miles above Africa at a speed of about 17,000 mph. When mission specialist Robert Curbeam hung upside down, demonstrating his weightlessness, everyone knew it was the real thing.
EXPLORE
July 26, 2011
Students could be moved to underused schools out west A careful reading of the Howard County Times provides solutions for the over crowding of public schools and the proposed tax payer funded Tennis Stadium. The new Elementary school, the public park and the adjoining tennis stadium are to be build on Duckets Lane. Perhaps, the Elementary School, the park and tennis stadium could share space (like at Veterans Elementary and the YMCA) so there is enough room for all the children at the school.
NEWS
July 20, 2011
The scheduled touchdown of the space shuttle Atlantis Thursday at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida marks the end of a 30-year era in the U.S. manned spaceflight program. The space shuttle Columbia first flew in 1981, and since then the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has completed 135 missions aboard the delta-winged space planes, which have carried into orbit everything from classified military satellites to the Hubble Space Telescope and components for the International Space Station.
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