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By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
What lies at the center of that giant ball of gas we call Jupiter? When you cut through the incredibly dense atmosphere of Venus, what's happening on the planet surface? These are the questions that dance in the mind of Johns Hopkins University student Jessica Noviello. For her, they are not the idle musings of a child but a calling, pulling her life's path into space. "To think of being part of a mission that might answer things people have been wondering about for decades, that's very alluring," says Noviello, a sophomore from Smithtown, N.Y. Hopkins professors say this curiosity makes Noviello the perfect trailblazer for the university's new minor in space science and engineering.
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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes, For The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2014
If a bus-sized iron asteroid traveling at approximately 12 miles per second hit New York City, would Baltimore be spared? The answer to this and other space questions can be found in Discover Space, an interactive learning exhibit on display at the Baltimore County Public Library's Towson branch through Oct. 29. Lisa Hughes, manager of the branch on York Road, said the exhibit will appeal to patrons from elementary aged kids to seniors....
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NEWS
September 22, 1995
A nonprofit organization devoted to space science studies is scouting the Annapolis area for what it hopes will be its 26th educational center in the country.The Challenger Center for Space Science Education's local committee would like to find a site before the end of the year, raise money for it and open it in two years, said Caroline R. Benson, a member of the local committee and president of a consulting firm in Annapolis. The committee wants the center to be centrally located in the county and is looking at publicly and privately owned sites.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
The first U.S.-launched satellite, Explorer I, was 6 feet long and weighed 30 pounds, and it led to the discovery of the Van Allen radiation belt that surrounds Earth. More than 50 years later, scientists could do a lot more with far less. Scientists in Maryland are helping to design satellites that could fit in a shoebox yet provide the same - or better - capabilities as NASA spacecraft that are far larger and more costly. The devices, composed of one or more 10-centimeter cubes, have been used over the past decade for affordable yet relatively low-tech experiments for university students, but a pair recently launched could advance the technology.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 2001
The application for the summer Center for Space Science for sixth-and seventh-graders rivaled a college entrance form. The two-week program takes place this week and next at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in North Laurel and at Centennial High School in Ellicott City. To enter the program, pupils wrote a two-page essay that outlined their interests, experiences and achievements. They submitted a teacher recommendation and listed their most recent science and math courses.
TOPIC
By Frank D. Roylance | February 13, 2005
Thirteen months ago, President Bush stood before an audience at NASA headquarters in Washington and set what he said was a "new course" for the nation's space program. "We will give NASA a new focus and vision for future exploration," he said. "We will build new ships to carry man forward into the universe, to gain a new foothold on the moon, and to prepare for new journeys to worlds beyond our own. They were inspiring words -- echoes of President John F. Kennedy's challenge to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the nation in 1961 to land a man on the moon -- and calculated to shove a manned space program stuck in low-Earth orbit off toward the cosmos.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | September 29, 2006
Space scientists at the University of Maryland's College Park and Baltimore County campuses will get an infusion of NASA cash from a new research center established in cooperation with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. NASA will support the center with as much as $7.5 million annually over the next five years, university officials said this week. Initial research will focus on high-energy astrophysics, including the workings of neutron stars, black holes and extremely hot gas across the universe.
NEWS
By Mario Livio | March 10, 2010
In recent days, some of those criticizing NASA's proposed budget have tried to paint a picture of an agency without a vision. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. NASA's far-reaching ambitions in space science have been, and will continue to be, truly inspiring. Just a few decades ago, cynical scientists used to say that there are only two facts known with certainty about the cosmos at large: that the sky is dark at night, and that our universe is expanding. This situation has changed drastically, and it has changed largely thanks to NASA's bold efforts in space science.
NEWS
By Mario Livio | March 10, 2010
T HE SEARCH WILL CONTINUE In recent days, some of those criticizing NASA's proposed budget have tried to paint a picture of an agency without a vision. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. NASA's far-reaching ambitions in space science have been, and will continue to be, truly inspiring. Just a few decades ago, cynical scientists used to say that there are only two facts known with certainty about the cosmos at large: that the sky is dark at night, and that our universe is expanding.
NEWS
April 13, 1993
In a fascinating follow-up to the Clinton-Yeltsin summit, the White House has ordered NASA to work with Russian scientists in an effort to save the controversial Space Station Freedom from death by cost-overrun.The ambitious project, carrying a price tag in the $30 billion to $40 billion range, plus $100 billion in operating expenses over 30 years, is now going through a painful downsizing redesign. Whether the effort will succeed may, indeed, require tapping into Russia's vaunted space technology.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2012
Half a century ago, a nearby cluster of stars appeared to astronomers as a single glowing ball of gas. As recently as 15 years ago, scientists realized it was in fact a cluster of stars but were convinced they all must have formed at the same time and with the same composition. Now astronomers at Baltimore's Space Telescope Science Institute have found evidence that one cluster may actually be two, one a million years older than the other, in the process of merging. The clusters are 170,000 light years from Earth in an area known as the Tarantula Nebula.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
What lies at the center of that giant ball of gas we call Jupiter? When you cut through the incredibly dense atmosphere of Venus, what's happening on the planet surface? These are the questions that dance in the mind of Johns Hopkins University student Jessica Noviello. For her, they are not the idle musings of a child but a calling, pulling her life's path into space. "To think of being part of a mission that might answer things people have been wondering about for decades, that's very alluring," says Noviello, a sophomore from Smithtown, N.Y. Hopkins professors say this curiosity makes Noviello the perfect trailblazer for the university's new minor in space science and engineering.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2011
Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said Wednesday she expects the Senate will pass a budget bill on Tuesday that will include $530 million to continue work toward launch of the Webb Space Telescope in 2018 "and secure America's place in astronomy for the next 50 years. " Speaking at a ribbon-cutting for a new Webb Telescope exhibit at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore, the Democratic senator added that she hopes to have the funding bill "on the president's desk to be signed into law by Thanksgiving.
NEWS
September 3, 2011
As a child, I remember a coloring book that pictured a "Buck Rogers" rocket that looked like a football with three fins at its base. It was my job to give it life by coloring the rocket blast with yellows, oranges and reds that lifted the craft to stellar flight and imagined adventures. The book was filled with such renderings and each page held a new mission to be wondered at. Years later came Alan Shepard, Walter "Wally" Shirra Jr., John Glenn Jr., and tragically Virgil "Gus" Grissom who later died in an Apollo 1 pre-launch test.
NEWS
By Mario Livio | March 10, 2010
In recent days, some of those criticizing NASA's proposed budget have tried to paint a picture of an agency without a vision. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. NASA's far-reaching ambitions in space science have been, and will continue to be, truly inspiring. Just a few decades ago, cynical scientists used to say that there are only two facts known with certainty about the cosmos at large: that the sky is dark at night, and that our universe is expanding. This situation has changed drastically, and it has changed largely thanks to NASA's bold efforts in space science.
NEWS
By Mario Livio | March 10, 2010
T HE SEARCH WILL CONTINUE In recent days, some of those criticizing NASA's proposed budget have tried to paint a picture of an agency without a vision. In fact, nothing could be further from the truth. NASA's far-reaching ambitions in space science have been, and will continue to be, truly inspiring. Just a few decades ago, cynical scientists used to say that there are only two facts known with certainty about the cosmos at large: that the sky is dark at night, and that our universe is expanding.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1996
The Universities Space Research Association, a nonprofit corporation based in Columbia, will lead a team of industries and researchers in a $484.2 million contract to develop and operate an airborne infrared observatory.The National Aeronautics and Space Administration awarded the 10-year contract for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA.USRA is a 28-year-old organization linking the space science and technological research efforts of 80 institutions, including two in Canada and one each in England and Israel.
NEWS
January 5, 2010
John M. Grunsfeld, a former NASA astronaut who logged more than 58 hours on spacewalks during three missions to repair and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope, has been named deputy director of the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore. Grunsfeld, who holds a doctorate in physics and specializes in X-ray and gamma-ray astronomy and high-energy cosmic ray studies. In a statement, he called his new job "an incredibly exciting opportunity for me to work at a focal point of top astronomers at the leading edge of scientific inquiry."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | September 29, 2006
Space scientists at the University of Maryland's College Park and Baltimore County campuses will get an infusion of NASA cash from a new research center established in cooperation with NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. NASA will support the center with as much as $7.5 million annually over the next five years, university officials said this week. Initial research will focus on high-energy astrophysics, including the workings of neutron stars, black holes and extremely hot gas across the universe.
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