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By Frank D. Roylance and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 22, 2010
Meteorite hunters are descending on Washington's Virginia suburbs this week, drawn by news of a space rock that lit up the night sky on Monday and drilled through the roof of a Lorton doctors' office. Steve Arnold, co-star of the Science Channel's TV series "Meteorite Men," grabbed an early-morning flight Thursday from Arkansas to Baltimore to launch a search for fragments of the meteor. He was joined by Michael R. Hankey, an amateur astronomer from Freeland who was bitten by the meteorite-hunting bug last July after he snapped a photo of a fireball meteor that fell over the Maryland- Pennsylvania state line.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance | January 23, 2010
Meteorite hunters are descending on Washington's Virginia suburbs this week, drawn by news of a space rock that lit up the night sky on Monday and drilled through the roof of a Lorton doctors' office. Steve Arnold, co-star of the Science Channel's TV series "Meteorite Men," grabbed an early-morning flight from Arkansas to Baltimore on Thursday to launch a search for fragments of the meteor. He was joined by Michael R. Hankey, an amateur astronomer from Freeland who was bitten by the meteorite-hunting bug last July after he snapped a photo of a fireball that fell over the Maryland-Pennsylvania state line.
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NEWS
December 5, 1999
" 'A Fish Out of Water' by Helen Palmer is about a little fish at the pet store. A little boy got it. Mr. Carp told him not to feed him too much. But he did and his little fish grew too big! I like this book because the fish gets in the pool."-- Danielle WoodardFountain Green Elementary"You will love 'Space Rock' by Jon Buller and Susan Schade for many reasons. First, the book is amusing because rocks really don't talk. Finally, the book is mysterious because you don't know if Space Rock is going to come back to earth."
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi and Nicholas Riccardi,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
HAVILAND, Kan. -- Steve Arnold is driving the yellow Hummer in circles around a Kiowa County wheat field, towing an 18-foot-wide metal detector. For an hour, nothing but silence. Finally, the detector whines, and Arnold slams the brakes. "That is so good," he says. Arnold jumps out, pinpoints the location with a smaller detector and starts digging. The renowned meteorite hunter is hoping for a big score. He has had three false hits today, unearthing a bit of barbed wire, a fragment of a plow, a squashed Dr Pepper can. "What's the definition of insanity?"
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Dale Pearce took a rock to work Tuesday and told his co-workers it fell out of the sky Saturday night, and he found it in the woods behind his Pasadena home. Sure, Dale. They didn't believe him at first. But Pearce may get the last laugh. The plum-sized rock that he says blazed out of the sky and smacked into the ground behind the Pasadena Crossroads Shopping Center has been identified by a NASA scientist as a genuine stony meteorite. Pearce and his rock were due at the Smithsonian Institution this morning, where experts will cut a slice from it to confirm and classify the discovery.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 10, 2002
You can skip this column. I'm sure you have more important things to do. You don't need to waste your valuable time reading about how MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, POSSIBLY INCLUDING YOU, RECENTLY WERE ALMOST KILLED BY A GIANT SPACE ROCK AND THERE ARE MORE COMING AND NOBODY IS DOING ANYTHING ABOUT IT. Excuse me for going into CAPS LOCK mode, but I am a little upset here. In case you didn't hear about it, which you probably didn't: On Jan. 7, an asteroid 1,000 feet across -- nearly three times the current diameter of Marlon Brando -- barely missed the Earth, which is most likely your planet of residence.
FEATURES
By Seth Borenstein and Seth Borenstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Part P.T. Barnum, part Indiana Jones and all Daddy Warbucks, Bob Haag scours the Earth looking for rocks from space -- and he finds them.While most scientists use metal detectors to find meteorites, Haag uses his mouth, a trader's wits and his considerable wallet to find rocks that can be 100 times more valuable than gold.After a rock from space falls out of the sky, Haag shows up. But he doesn't just spread the word that he wants to buy meteorites, he shouts it from rented loudspeakers atop cars.
NEWS
By Nicholas Riccardi and Nicholas Riccardi,Los Angeles Times | October 28, 2007
HAVILAND, Kan. -- Steve Arnold is driving the yellow Hummer in circles around a Kiowa County wheat field, towing an 18-foot-wide metal detector. For an hour, nothing but silence. Finally, the detector whines, and Arnold slams the brakes. "That is so good," he says. Arnold jumps out, pinpoints the location with a smaller detector and starts digging. The renowned meteorite hunter is hoping for a big score. He has had three false hits today, unearthing a bit of barbed wire, a fragment of a plow, a squashed Dr Pepper can. "What's the definition of insanity?"
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 2002
METEOR CRATER, Ariz. -- About 50,000 years ago, a fireball streaked across the sky at 11 miles per second and crashed into the desert here, triggering a blast 1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bomb that devastated Hiroshima. The meteorite was 150 feet wide and weighed 300,000 tons. In less than 10 seconds, it sent 175 million tons of material flying miles in all directions. The blast killed all the animal life -- mastodons, mammoths, giant ground sloths and bison -- within several miles.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
Every few years, astronomers who study asteroids are accused of crying wolf. In 1998, one group predicted that an asteroid was headed toward a collision with Earth in 2028. A day later, another group said the estimate was based on faulty data and there was no chance of a disaster. In April 2002, astronomers announced that they'd found an asteroid a half-mile wide that has a 1-in-300 chance of hitting Earth. But it turned out that Asteroid 1950 DA, as it's formally known, won't arrive until March 16, 2880.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2003
Every few years, astronomers who study asteroids are accused of crying wolf. In 1998, one group predicted that an asteroid was headed toward a collision with Earth in 2028. A day later, another group said the estimate was based on faulty data and there was no chance of a disaster. In April 2002, astronomers announced that they'd found an asteroid a half-mile wide that has a 1-in-300 chance of hitting Earth. But it turned out that Asteroid 1950 DA, as it's formally known, won't arrive until March 16, 2880.
NEWS
By Mike Adams and Mike Adams,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 2002
METEOR CRATER, Ariz. -- About 50,000 years ago, a fireball streaked across the sky at 11 miles per second and crashed into the desert here, triggering a blast 1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bomb that devastated Hiroshima. The meteorite was 150 feet wide and weighed 300,000 tons. In less than 10 seconds, it sent 175 million tons of material flying miles in all directions. The blast killed all the animal life -- mastodons, mammoths, giant ground sloths and bison -- within several miles.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2002
Dale Pearce took a rock to work Tuesday and told his co-workers it fell out of the sky Saturday night, and he found it in the woods behind his Pasadena home. Sure, Dale. They didn't believe him at first. But Pearce may get the last laugh. The plum-sized rock that he says blazed out of the sky and smacked into the ground behind the Pasadena Crossroads Shopping Center has been identified by a NASA scientist as a genuine stony meteorite. Pearce and his rock were due at the Smithsonian Institution this morning, where experts will cut a slice from it to confirm and classify the discovery.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 10, 2002
You can skip this column. I'm sure you have more important things to do. You don't need to waste your valuable time reading about how MILLIONS OF PEOPLE, POSSIBLY INCLUDING YOU, RECENTLY WERE ALMOST KILLED BY A GIANT SPACE ROCK AND THERE ARE MORE COMING AND NOBODY IS DOING ANYTHING ABOUT IT. Excuse me for going into CAPS LOCK mode, but I am a little upset here. In case you didn't hear about it, which you probably didn't: On Jan. 7, an asteroid 1,000 feet across -- nearly three times the current diameter of Marlon Brando -- barely missed the Earth, which is most likely your planet of residence.
NEWS
December 5, 1999
" 'A Fish Out of Water' by Helen Palmer is about a little fish at the pet store. A little boy got it. Mr. Carp told him not to feed him too much. But he did and his little fish grew too big! I like this book because the fish gets in the pool."-- Danielle WoodardFountain Green Elementary"You will love 'Space Rock' by Jon Buller and Susan Schade for many reasons. First, the book is amusing because rocks really don't talk. Finally, the book is mysterious because you don't know if Space Rock is going to come back to earth."
FEATURES
By Seth Borenstein and Seth Borenstein,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 5, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Part P.T. Barnum, part Indiana Jones and all Daddy Warbucks, Bob Haag scours the Earth looking for rocks from space -- and he finds them.While most scientists use metal detectors to find meteorites, Haag uses his mouth, a trader's wits and his considerable wallet to find rocks that can be 100 times more valuable than gold.After a rock from space falls out of the sky, Haag shows up. But he doesn't just spread the word that he wants to buy meteorites, he shouts it from rented loudspeakers atop cars.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
An Aug. 11 article about meteorites incorrectly described isotopes of nitrogen and hydrogen. An atom of nitrogen 14 contains 7 protons and 7 neutrons. Nitrogen 15 has 7 protons and 8 neutrons. A hydrogen atom has no neutrons. Its isotope deuterium has one.The Sun regrets the error.No, the meteorite is not stamped "Made on Mars."But the Martian origin of the rock that NASA scientists say holds evidence of long-ago life on the Red Planet is probably the least controversial aspect of their extraordinary scientific claims.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
An Aug. 11 article about meteorites incorrectly described isotopes of nitrogen and hydrogen. An atom of nitrogen 14 contains 7 protons and 7 neutrons. Nitrogen 15 has 7 protons and 8 neutrons. A hydrogen atom has no neutrons. Its isotope deuterium has one.The Sun regrets the error.No, the meteorite is not stamped "Made on Mars."But the Martian origin of the rock that NASA scientists say holds evidence of long-ago life on the Red Planet is probably the least controversial aspect of their extraordinary scientific claims.
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