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NEWS
By Albert Sehlstedt Jr. and Albert Sehlstedt Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1994
On July 20, the United States will observe the 25th anniversary of that costly, sometimes controversial and genuinely astonishing accomplishment, the first landing of men on the moon in Apollo 11.It was the denouement of an international drama between the two Cold War superpowers that eschewed firing missiles at each other but were launching spacecraft toward the moon and beyond to strut their stuff on an international stage.The drama began in 1957. On an October evening in Washington, Russian and American scientists were attending a party at the Soviet Embassy when news reports from Moscow announced that the Soviet Union had launched the first artificial satellite to orbit of the Earth.
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NEWS
By James Lilliefors | April 8, 2013
Last December, an American milestone passed virtually unnoticed. Forty years earlier, Harrison Schmitt became the 12th and last person to walk on the moon. Mr. Schmitt and the 11 men who preceded him - beginning with Neil Armstrong in 1969 - had this in common: All were employees of the United States government. Some have argued that sending men to the moon may not have been the most prudent use of American resources or ingenuity. But the realization of President John F. Kennedy's dream of a U.S. moon walk before the end of the 1960s became a symbol of the scientific and imaginative leadership of this country and what Kennedy termed our "freedom doctrine" during the Cold War. Now, the United States has an opportunity, even an obligation, to mobilize its resources and knowhow to achieve a more practical, and pressing, end. Increasingly under siege by destructive and deadly weather events - wrought, many scientists believe, by man-made climate change - we need to make a national commitment to weather research, including the fields of geo-engineering, weather modification and storm mitigation.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | May 18, 1997
WASHINGTON - "Space Race," a new National Air and Space Museum exhibition, displays the U.S.-Soviet relationship in space from their competition in the 1950s and 1960s to their cooperation in the 1970s.It had its origin in a 1993 auction at which an anonymous American paid $4 million for an array of Soviet artifacts.The anonymous American turned out to be Dallas billionaire Ross Perot, and many of the items he bought are included in the exhibition in the museum's soaring Space Hall."It's an exciting day," Perot said at last week's preview.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun reporter | September 15, 2007
As John Keenan hauled the last of the furniture from his son Patrick's bedroom, he could hear banging upstairs. It was the sound of 13-year-old Thomas demolishing the wall that divided his bedroom from his big brother's. The Dumbarton Middle School eighth-grader, who said he formerly didn't have enough room to even throw his clothes on the floor, now has enough space for a drum set, a new stereo and a cage full of lizards. "The wall came down at the speed of light," says his father, a structural engineer who lives in Idlewylde.
FEATURES
June 25, 1999
If ever a film was meant to be seen under the stars, it's "October Sky," a marvelous evocation of what it was like to be a kid in the early days of the space race (it's set in the months after the Soviet Union's launch of Sputnik) and a poignant look at how fathers and sons can connect in all sorts of ways. It's also that rarest of rarities, a family film suitable for all ages.So thank goodness D. Vogel and his Bengies Drive-In have returned for yet another season of open-air film exhibition.
NEWS
By James Lilliefors | April 8, 2013
Last December, an American milestone passed virtually unnoticed. Forty years earlier, Harrison Schmitt became the 12th and last person to walk on the moon. Mr. Schmitt and the 11 men who preceded him - beginning with Neil Armstrong in 1969 - had this in common: All were employees of the United States government. Some have argued that sending men to the moon may not have been the most prudent use of American resources or ingenuity. But the realization of President John F. Kennedy's dream of a U.S. moon walk before the end of the 1960s became a symbol of the scientific and imaginative leadership of this country and what Kennedy termed our "freedom doctrine" during the Cold War. Now, the United States has an opportunity, even an obligation, to mobilize its resources and knowhow to achieve a more practical, and pressing, end. Increasingly under siege by destructive and deadly weather events - wrought, many scientists believe, by man-made climate change - we need to make a national commitment to weather research, including the fields of geo-engineering, weather modification and storm mitigation.
NEWS
By JOHN JOHNSON JR. and JOHN JOHNSON JR.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2006
HOUSTON -- Behind 18 inches of concrete in stainless steel cabinets flushed with pure nitrogen rests a material rarer than gold, more valuable than diamonds. Not even NASA curator Gary Lofgren knows both combinations to the Johnson Space Center's vault that contains 600 pounds of lunar rocks and soil. Of late, Lofgren has noticed something unusual - there's been a run on moon dirt. Gram by precious gram, he has been doling out samples to researchers around the world eager to study the desolate orb again.
NEWS
By Dick George | January 23, 1992
NOW THAT it looks like communism really has done the big el foldo in the Soviet Union, I say it's time at last to recognize all the good things communism did for us.For instance, communism was our national boogeyman. We never knew when those nutbuckets in the Kremlin were going to jump out at us and go "Boo!"So naturally we've all been scared to death, and that's good,because if you're not scared out of your mind about half the time, you never get anything done.Without the commie threat, would we have had the space race?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | December 17, 2000
"Code to Zero," by Ken Follett. Dutton. 368 pages. $26.95. The engine of any Ken Follett thriller is plot, cruising on the clean fuel of direct, uncluttered writing. "Code to Zero," his latest, follows this familiar flight plan to the letter, moving briskly toward a down-to-the wire climax while stretching but never breaching the barriers of disbelief. Follett often sets his novels in the past -- Victorian England, Czarist Russia, Cairo during World War II, to name three -- and this time he takes the reader to Cold War Washington.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,New York Times News Service | August 8, 1993
NEW YORK -- The gaze behind the helmet visor on the soft pink face of Ivan Ivanovich, the first Soviet mannequin in space, is as melancholy as all Pushkin.It is as if Ivan always knew the gallant adventure of communism's astronauts would come to this -- a hard-currency auction at Sotheby's.The hundreds of artifacts of the Soviet space program range from a well-charred space capsule built for three, to Ivan himself, the full-sized Soviet test dummy, still suited up and ready for earth's bittersweet turnings.
NEWS
By JOHN JOHNSON JR. and JOHN JOHNSON JR.,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 12, 2006
HOUSTON -- Behind 18 inches of concrete in stainless steel cabinets flushed with pure nitrogen rests a material rarer than gold, more valuable than diamonds. Not even NASA curator Gary Lofgren knows both combinations to the Johnson Space Center's vault that contains 600 pounds of lunar rocks and soil. Of late, Lofgren has noticed something unusual - there's been a run on moon dirt. Gram by precious gram, he has been doling out samples to researchers around the world eager to study the desolate orb again.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Harold M. Watson, a retired Westinghouse Electric Corp. aerospace engineer whose career encompassed the automated pilot technology of the 1940s and the first orbital flight of the Columbia space shuttle in 1981, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Somerford Place, a Columbia assisted-living facility. He was 84. Mr. Watson was born and raised in Denver, and earned a degree in electrical engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1943. He began his career that year with Westinghouse in Pittsburgh, in the company's electro-mechanical section working on automated pilot technology that was installed on fighter aircraft.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | May 2, 2004
THE CRAMPED Howard County YMCA in Ellicott City is going to try again to double in size, hoping for more than a little help from a recent zoning change and the vision and deep financial pockets of land developers. Troy Weaver, executive director of the YMCA on Montgomery Road, has notified members by letter that the Y's board of managers is asking developers to propose ways of developing part - or even all - of the institution's 12.5 acres. In an interview, Weaver said that ideas have been solicited from about 70 developers operating primarily in Howard County, as well as nearby parts of Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 9, 2003
BEIJING - The leaders of China's secretive space program have it all figured out: Put humans in orbit by the end of this year. Send people to the moon by maybe 2020. Send people to Mars by, say, 2030. Then, of course, mine for extraterrestrial resources and settle colonies in space. Just what are the Chinese up to? Decades after the U.S.-Soviet race to the moon captivated the world during the Cold War, China is quietly conducting a space race of its own, albeit at a more leisurely pace.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 2, 2002
Baltimore must expand its convention center again or risk losing ground in the meetings industry, according to the head of the city's convention and visitor association. To the south, Washington is building a center with 750,000 square feet of exhibit space. To the north, Philadelphia is trying to double its space. Boston is constructing a convention center with twice Baltimore's space. "We have to be cognizant of what other cities are doing," said Carroll R. Armstrong, president and chief executive of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 11, 2001
MOSCOW - Forty years ago tomorrow, on April 12, 1961, Soviet Air Force Lt. Yuri Gagarin was about to become the first man in space. Andrian Nikolaev was selected to join him on the bus ride out to the launch pad. Though Gagarin wasn't given to solemnity, he turned as he got off the bus to give Nilolaev a farewell kiss. Gagarin forgot he was wearing his helmet, and he smacked Nikolaev across the nose. With that, the Space Age began. It was a time of adventure, pluck, ingenuity and enthusiasm.
NEWS
January 10, 2001
4Kids: FEATURED SITE of the month THE SCIENCE OF COLOR The Tech Museum of Innovation offers a fascinating interactive look at color in its online exhibit "Make a Splash With Color" at www.thetech.org / exhibits_events / online / color / . The site is divided into three sections. Talking About Color covers the basics of hue, saturation and brightness. The Lighter Side of Color looks at color as light, including sections on rainbows and prisms. An Eye on Color explores the eye and the biology of sight in humans and some animals.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | September 15, 1998
The Buzz Aldrins of the world have a new hero. Suddenly, Cubs slugger Sammy Sosa is the man for anyone who ever languished as a sidekick, runner-up, second fiddle or minor historical footnote. You know who you are.With his stirring challenge to Mark McGwire's eminence as a home run champion, Sosa has become a hero for the surpassed, eclipsed, outshone, dwarfed, diminished and towered over.Ed McMahons rule!If Sosa hits more homers than McGwire this season -- each has 62 -- he would shatter the ego-swallowing ideal set by Aldrin, who became the second man to walk on the moon after Neil Armstrong.
NEWS
January 10, 2001
4Kids: FEATURED SITE of the month THE SCIENCE OF COLOR The Tech Museum of Innovation offers a fascinating interactive look at color in its online exhibit "Make a Splash With Color" at www.thetech.org / exhibits_events / online / color / . The site is divided into three sections. Talking About Color covers the basics of hue, saturation and brightness. The Lighter Side of Color looks at color as light, including sections on rainbows and prisms. An Eye on Color explores the eye and the biology of sight in humans and some animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff | December 17, 2000
"Code to Zero," by Ken Follett. Dutton. 368 pages. $26.95. The engine of any Ken Follett thriller is plot, cruising on the clean fuel of direct, uncluttered writing. "Code to Zero," his latest, follows this familiar flight plan to the letter, moving briskly toward a down-to-the wire climax while stretching but never breaching the barriers of disbelief. Follett often sets his novels in the past -- Victorian England, Czarist Russia, Cairo during World War II, to name three -- and this time he takes the reader to Cold War Washington.
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