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July 26, 2011
Students could be moved to underused schools out west A careful reading of the Howard County Times provides solutions for the over crowding of public schools and the proposed tax payer funded Tennis Stadium. The new Elementary school, the public park and the adjoining tennis stadium are to be build on Duckets Lane. Perhaps, the Elementary School, the park and tennis stadium could share space (like at Veterans Elementary and the YMCA) so there is enough room for all the children at the school.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
Thanks to his unabashed enthusiasm for the job and his way with a tweet, Cockeysville's Reid Wiseman is becoming quite the Twitterverse celebrity as he orbits the Earth on the International Space Station. Almost from the moment he arrived at the station May 29, Wiseman, 38, has been posting photographs and commentary to his Twitter feed (his handle is @astro_reid). Even before his Soyuz flight took off May 28, Wiseman was posting selfies, including some featuring his crew mates German astronaut Alexander Gerst and Russian cosmonaut Maxim Suraev.
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NEWS
By C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger | January 4, 2011
In 1957, the United States was shocked into action after Russia launched the first man-made satellite, Sputnik. America answered the challenge and landed a man on the moon 12 years later. A robust American industry was born. Exciting careers were created for the brightest American scientists. Unprecedented emphasis was put on science research and education. Just about every kid on Earth wanted to be Neil Armstrong. Today, America is slipping. The president announced plans to cancel Constellation, the plan to return astronauts to the moon by 2020.
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
State officials announced a partnership with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Monday that aims to attract and grow companies that can help support space missions or adapt NASA technology for other commercial purposes. A memorandum of understanding between the state and the Greenbelt installation will help the two share industry trends, technology licensing opportunities and work force demands, said Nona Cheeks, chief of Goddard's innovative technology partnerships office. As part of the partnership, Goddard plans to host a "Space Academy" program for businesses to connect with NASA and each other on projects, whether they are related to space or not, she said.
EXPLORE
August 30, 2011
Amanda Song, a student at Cockeysville Middle School, was among five Baltimore County Public Schools students participating in the Maryland Department of Education's Summer Center for Space Science in July. The summer program is sponsored by the Science Applications International Corporation and the Northeastern Maryland Technology Council. Each day at the camp, students had the opportunity to work with NASA scientists and engineers to plan a space mission, including designing a satellite, building a scale model of a spacecraft, and designing a lunar robot.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 6, 2003
BOSTON - Should I confess that I didn't even know they were up there? When Columbia ripped the clear blue sky with a trail of horrific beauty, I didn't know for a moment whether it was a launch or a landing that had gone so terribly awry. This was the shuttle program's 113th voyage into space. Count to 113 in baby steps - and space exploration is still in that toddler state - and get barely halfway down my block. But the shuttle had already become routine, a word we use to tempt the gods.
NEWS
By Pamela Clark | March 15, 1991
WHAT'S WRONG with America's manned space program as it approaches its 30th anniversary? For one thing, new plans for solving NASA's ills seem to surface so frequently that little productive action can ever be taken. This is the major reason NASA's management has been so ineffective while the rest of the space agency's employees have been scrambling in the trenches trying to keep things going. Not surprisingly, the General Accounting Office recently published a report citing the shoddy condition of NASA's physical facilities.
NEWS
November 30, 1990
Mae D. Silbergeld, a technical manager for contractors in the U.S. space program, died Nov. 22 at Bethesda naval hospital of cardiac arrest. She was 66 and had lived in Garrett Park.Ms. Silbergeld had worked for ST Systems Corp. since 1983 and, for 13 years before that, for Computer Sciences Corp., managing work under contract to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt.She graduated from the University of Dayton and earned a master's degree from the University of Illinois.
NEWS
By ANTHONY R. CURTIS | July 15, 1994
Salisbury -- Americans have been radiating pride for 25 years since Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, but the warm glow is cooling. If we want our children to know the same pride we feel, we need to start now on a return trip to the moon.The Apollo astronaut took his ''one small step for man'' on July 20, 1969. For years after his ''one giant leap for mankind,'' America was honored as the world's technology leader.The Apollo achievements came at the right time to lift us from gloom. We were passing through a time of hot war and cold war, riots and political unrest, assassination and social change.
FEATURES
February 26, 1991
The PBS science program Nova has a February miniseries of its own this week, a three-part, three-hour history of the Soviet space program called "Russian Right Stuff."Actually, as this fascinating documentary -- on Maryland Public Television, Channels 22 and 67, tonight, tomorrow and Thursday nights at 8 o'clock -- tells the story, the Russian space stuff was more right, then wrong, then right again.Tonight's hour is about the magnificent rise of Soviet space exploration -- the flights of the first Sputnik satellites, the first living creatures in space, the orbit of Yuri Gagarin, the first woman in space -- led by a man kept anonymous by a ideology that wanted his work to be seen as the product of a system, not a genius.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | October 22, 2013
I recently had a chance to watch the space-themed film "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney. Leaving aside the multitude of technical errors in the film, as someone who has consulted in the space business for a number years, I always welcome it when Hollywood brings much needed attention to human spaceflight and its importance to us as a people and a nation. That said, as the film played, I wondered if others would also find the casting and script as ironic and troubling as I did. While Ms. Bullock works hard to keep her political views private while quite possibly being the most decent and generous person in the film business, Mr. Clooney has never made it a secret that he is an enthusiastic supporter of Barack Obama and the Democratic Party.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum has been taking the Glenn L. Martin Company rocket age history on the road to Harford County. Thanks to support from the Dresher Foundation, the museum is offering its outreach STEM education program "From Sand Dunes to the Moon" to third grade classes at Harford County elementary schools. This interactive activity celebrating flight and Maryland's contribution to the pioneering days of manned space exploration is designed to launch excitement for aerospace possibilities as it inspires students to explore the future of aviation while they discover and learn to appreciate the technological wonders of the past.
NEWS
May 1, 2013
Thanks for reporting on the real ownership of the 20 acres at the proposed Mays Chapel Elementary School site ("Mays Chapel school groundbreaking disrupted by protesters," April 26). Contrary to County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's claim that the Baltimore County School System owns all 20-plus acres at this site and thus has the right to use it for a school, the BPCS owns only 10 acres; the other 10 acres are owned by Baltimore County Department of Parks and Recreation. The parks department's open space program requires reasonable use of the space by all citizens.
FEATURES
By Jamie Bacon, For The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
I have been engaged for a month and a half and already I feel so accomplished in terms of my wedding planning. Everyone I talk to tells me how on top of things I am, and it's so nice to hear because that is usually not me at all.  When it comes to cleaning or school work I have always been the biggest procrastinator. I wonder now why I haven't been so organized with all aspects of life, but, then, let's be real: Planning a wedding and my future with the love of my life is way more exciting than studying or vacuuming the house.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
William Charles Brubaker, a retired aeronautical engineer who was a founding trombone player in the Baltimore Colts Marching Band, died Feb. 12 at Sinai Hospital of complications from injuries he suffered near his Lutherville home. Family members said he was struck by a vehicle while walking last year. He was 91. Born in Altoona, Pa., he earned a degree in aeronautical engineering at what is now Trine University in Angola, Ind. During World War II, he served in the Army Air Forces in a communications unit.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
Sally Ride had the coolest name. Perfect for the first American woman in space. On that day in 1983 when she shattered the ultimate glass ceiling aboard the shuttle Challenger, many in the crowd of a quarter-million people watching the launch — a group that included feminist icons Jane Fonda and Gloria Steinem — were wearing T-shirts that read "Ride, Sally, Ride. " Her journey was the ultimate cover for Wilson Pickett's rock 'n' roll lyrics. Dr. Ride, who died Monday at 61 in La Jolla, Calif., after a very private battle with pancreatic cancer, was cool, too. She was chosen for the shuttle crew by NASA administrator Chris Kraft because he thought she could handle the pressure.
NEWS
By Albert Sehlstedt Jr | December 16, 1990
"Our national ambitions have greatly outrun our national competence," said Dr. James A. Van Allen, the physicist who discovered the radiation belts around the Earth.His remark might well have been incorporated in last week's report by a panel of experts that recommended that the nation's space program be substantially altered by de-emphasizing the space shuttle, developing a new class of unmanned rockets to carry payloads aloft and simplifying the planned -- and expensive -- space station.
NEWS
By Erica Schoenberger | November 21, 2011
Those who think the government shouldn't be promoting energy innovation have short memories. The federal government's satellite and ballistic missile program spillovers are what brought us Silicon Valley. The energy program spillovers are going to land someplace else. Bringing about a technological and industrial revolution requires a huge commitment of collective resources as well as private initiative. It requires fundamental research, well ahead of the possibility of commercialization.
NEWS
November 1, 2011
What does it say about our country that a marvel like the Webb telescope faces possible cancellation after years of development and with its components 75 percent complete? We face budget problems, I understand. But boundary-pushing missions like Apollo, Mars rovers, and the Webb are fundamental to the American character - we go where no one's ever been, and do things no one else can do. Other nations aren't slowing down. China is launching a new space station, and its Chang'e probe just mapped the moon and is now parked at the L2 Lagrange orbital point, more than a million kilometers from earth.
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