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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 10, 1991
Perhaps no director has combined genius with coldness to quite the same degree as Stanley Kubrick. His epic head trip "2001: A Space Odyssey" is as beautiful as a diamond tiara but as warm and feeling as an anthrax germ.The movie, as stunning now (particularly on the Senator's big screen, where it opens today as part of that theater's 70mm film festival) as it was in 1968 when it redefined the concept of special effects, offers a view of the universe's significance and homo sapiens' insignificance.
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By Michael Sragow Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 25, 2007
Everyone knows that George Lucas' Star Wars series takes place "A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away ... " But the key line repeated verbatim in the dialogue of all six Star Wars movies is, "I have a bad feeling about this." It would be dramatic to report that 30 years ago today, during the original Star Wars' premiere, Lucas' competitors were having "a bad feeling about this." Dramatic - but wrong, because Lucas' rivals had no feeling about Star Wars at all. Unlike Jaws, which had ruled the summer two years earlier, Star Wars wasn't based on a best-seller.
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By Jonathan R. Cohen and Jonathan R. Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 1997
"Stanley Kubrick: A Biography," by Vincent LoBrutto. Donald L. Fine Books.640 pages. $29.95.The world's appetite for American sportswear, records and films is growing. Each year it seems whole forests are sacrificed to print books about the stars at the center of our expanding entertainment universe. Yet few if any of these works provide an understanding of why today's American popular culture is as influential as the automobile or the electric light. Unfortunately, with "Stanley Kubrick: A Biography," Vincent LoBrutto, the author of a number of books on film and a professional film editor, has forfeited an excellent opportunity to break the trend.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2004
NOW OR NEVER Instead of heading "downy ocean" this weekend, why not consider a trip down Southern Maryland? Tomorrow in St. Mary's City, the imaginative and popular River Concert Series, presented by St. Mary's College of Maryland, presents the starry finale of its sixth season of outdoor performances. Jeffrey Silberschlag will conduct the Chesapeake Orchestra in music associated with the heavens, including Gustav Holst's The Planets, Richard Strauss' Also Sprach Zarathustra (forever linked to the film 2001: A Space Odyssey)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alan Cheuse and Alan Cheuse,Chicago Tribune | January 18, 2004
Time's Eye, by Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter. Del Rey. 337 pages. $26.95 including CD-ROM. Here's the publishing equivalent of a Spielberg movie opening -- not just a terrific new science-fiction novel by two of the greatest living practitioners of the genre (the reigning genius of the form and long-time resident of Sri Lanka, and a former British engineer turned award-winning novelist) but also an artifact of our times. Along with a novel about a major collision of time and space comes a CD-ROM that includes an interview with the two writers and Adobe eBook editions of Baxter's novels Manifold: Time and Evolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2004
NOW OR NEVER Instead of heading "downy ocean" this weekend, why not consider a trip down Southern Maryland? Tomorrow in St. Mary's City, the imaginative and popular River Concert Series, presented by St. Mary's College of Maryland, presents the starry finale of its sixth season of outdoor performances. Jeffrey Silberschlag will conduct the Chesapeake Orchestra in music associated with the heavens, including Gustav Holst's The Planets, Richard Strauss' Also Sprach Zarathustra (forever linked to the film 2001: A Space Odyssey)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 12, 2001
"Everybody pretty much acknowledges he's the man," Jack Nicholson says of director Stanley Kubrick, "and I still feel that underrates him." That's pretty much the tenor of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a 2 1/2 -hour documentary on the legendarily spotlight-shunning filmmaker, made with the cooperation of his family and premiering at 7:30 tonight on Cinemax. Produced and directed by Kubrick's longtime assistant Jan Harlan (who was also his brother-in-law), the film includes interviews with family members, co-workers and a host of actors from his films, including Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Matthew Modine, Malcolm McDowell, Keir Dullea, Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise (who also narrates)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SALON | February 4, 2001
Near the start of "Shadow of the Vampire," the producer of the 1922 vampire classic "Nosferatu" tells reporters that his 34-year-old director, F. W. Murnau, is Germany's greatest filmmaker. In 1964, when Stanley Kubrick began 4 1/2 years' work on "2001: A Space Odyssey," one could argue that he, at age 36, was America's greatest young director. By 1974, the mantle had passed to Francis Ford Coppola, 35, who had already done the first two "Godfather" films and "The Conversation." All these filmmakers came to mind in the past few weeks.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 25, 2007
Everyone knows that George Lucas' Star Wars series takes place "A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away ... " But the key line repeated verbatim in the dialogue of all six Star Wars movies is, "I have a bad feeling about this." It would be dramatic to report that 30 years ago today, during the original Star Wars' premiere, Lucas' competitors were having "a bad feeling about this." Dramatic - but wrong, because Lucas' rivals had no feeling about Star Wars at all. Unlike Jaws, which had ruled the summer two years earlier, Star Wars wasn't based on a best-seller.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 19, 2000
AS IF there weren't already enough irritating aspects to modern life, along comes the wonderful world of technology to offer us two more. First there is this: Banks are coming out with talking ATMs that greet you by name and wish you a happy birthday. The idea of a talking ATM is disturbing enough, of course. Who needs another hollow, insincere, computer-generated voice in his or her life? ("Please, stay on the line. Your call is important to us ...") To the more paranoid among us, it also summons visions of a petulant ATM flip-out like the one the super-computer Hal experienced in the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alan Cheuse and Alan Cheuse,Chicago Tribune | January 18, 2004
Time's Eye, by Arthur C. Clarke and Stephen Baxter. Del Rey. 337 pages. $26.95 including CD-ROM. Here's the publishing equivalent of a Spielberg movie opening -- not just a terrific new science-fiction novel by two of the greatest living practitioners of the genre (the reigning genius of the form and long-time resident of Sri Lanka, and a former British engineer turned award-winning novelist) but also an artifact of our times. Along with a novel about a major collision of time and space comes a CD-ROM that includes an interview with the two writers and Adobe eBook editions of Baxter's novels Manifold: Time and Evolution.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 12, 2001
"Everybody pretty much acknowledges he's the man," Jack Nicholson says of director Stanley Kubrick, "and I still feel that underrates him." That's pretty much the tenor of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a 2 1/2 -hour documentary on the legendarily spotlight-shunning filmmaker, made with the cooperation of his family and premiering at 7:30 tonight on Cinemax. Produced and directed by Kubrick's longtime assistant Jan Harlan (who was also his brother-in-law), the film includes interviews with family members, co-workers and a host of actors from his films, including Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Matthew Modine, Malcolm McDowell, Keir Dullea, Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise (who also narrates)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SALON | February 4, 2001
Near the start of "Shadow of the Vampire," the producer of the 1922 vampire classic "Nosferatu" tells reporters that his 34-year-old director, F. W. Murnau, is Germany's greatest filmmaker. In 1964, when Stanley Kubrick began 4 1/2 years' work on "2001: A Space Odyssey," one could argue that he, at age 36, was America's greatest young director. By 1974, the mantle had passed to Francis Ford Coppola, 35, who had already done the first two "Godfather" films and "The Conversation." All these filmmakers came to mind in the past few weeks.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2001
It's 2001 at last, stargazers, and we have a space station. Cue the orchestra and bring up the "Blue Danube" waltz. OK, so NASA's gawky International Space Station can't spin gracefully to the Strauss waltz, as Stanley Kubrick's big space-wheel did in his 1969 film, "2001: A Space Odyssey." But at least this space station is real. It's permanently inhabited now and visited regularly by shuttles and supply craft from Earth. Best of all, you can see it easily from your back yard. It's sure to be one of the new year's most reliable targets for backyard stargazers.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 19, 2000
AS IF there weren't already enough irritating aspects to modern life, along comes the wonderful world of technology to offer us two more. First there is this: Banks are coming out with talking ATMs that greet you by name and wish you a happy birthday. The idea of a talking ATM is disturbing enough, of course. Who needs another hollow, insincere, computer-generated voice in his or her life? ("Please, stay on the line. Your call is important to us ...") To the more paranoid among us, it also summons visions of a petulant ATM flip-out like the one the super-computer Hal experienced in the movie "2001: A Space Odyssey."
NEWS
December 11, 1999
WHEN the Mars Polar Lander sent no signal back to Earth this week, scientists fell to anguished soul-searching and finger pointing. Authorities in Washington came close to suggesting that heads would roll.Everyone needs to chill out. A bit of perspective would help. The Mars program may need some fine-tuning, but those with the federal purse should stop worrying about money when the mysteries of life might be purchased for nickels.First the perspective:Earthlings can hurl spaceships into the void as accurately as pitcher Mike Mussina hits corners of the plate from 90 feet away.
FEATURES
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | January 3, 2001
It's 2001 at last, stargazers, and we have a space station. Cue the orchestra and bring up the "Blue Danube" waltz. OK, so NASA's gawky International Space Station can't spin gracefully to the Strauss waltz, as Stanley Kubrick's big space-wheel did in his 1969 film, "2001: A Space Odyssey." But at least this space station is real. It's permanently inhabited now and visited regularly by shuttles and supply craft from Earth. Best of all, you can see it easily from your back yard. It's sure to be one of the new year's most reliable targets for backyard stargazers.
NEWS
December 11, 1999
WHEN the Mars Polar Lander sent no signal back to Earth this week, scientists fell to anguished soul-searching and finger pointing. Authorities in Washington came close to suggesting that heads would roll.Everyone needs to chill out. A bit of perspective would help. The Mars program may need some fine-tuning, but those with the federal purse should stop worrying about money when the mysteries of life might be purchased for nickels.First the perspective:Earthlings can hurl spaceships into the void as accurately as pitcher Mike Mussina hits corners of the plate from 90 feet away.
NEWS
By Jonathan R. Cohen and Jonathan R. Cohen,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 1997
"Stanley Kubrick: A Biography," by Vincent LoBrutto. Donald L. Fine Books.640 pages. $29.95.The world's appetite for American sportswear, records and films is growing. Each year it seems whole forests are sacrificed to print books about the stars at the center of our expanding entertainment universe. Yet few if any of these works provide an understanding of why today's American popular culture is as influential as the automobile or the electric light. Unfortunately, with "Stanley Kubrick: A Biography," Vincent LoBrutto, the author of a number of books on film and a professional film editor, has forfeited an excellent opportunity to break the trend.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | May 10, 1991
Perhaps no director has combined genius with coldness to quite the same degree as Stanley Kubrick. His epic head trip "2001: A Space Odyssey" is as beautiful as a diamond tiara but as warm and feeling as an anthrax germ.The movie, as stunning now (particularly on the Senator's big screen, where it opens today as part of that theater's 70mm film festival) as it was in 1968 when it redefined the concept of special effects, offers a view of the universe's significance and homo sapiens' insignificance.
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