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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Reporter | May 3, 1994
The Carroll County Commissioners yesterday rejected a proposal that was intended to reduce the paperwork required from the county Department of Recreation and Parks for municipal Program Open Space grants.Richard J. Soisson, Recreation and Parks director, had proposed that the county should reimburse municipalities for 28 percent of their open space projects directly, rather than requiring them to submit plans to the state program.County officials distribute state Program Open Space money based on a formula that averages 28 percent for each project, Mr. Soisson said, and his department helps municipal officials complete a complex state application for each project.
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NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
The Harford Land Trust is introducing criteria in choosing lands for preservation and initiating extensive fund raising to deal with budget cuts, it told its members at its annual meeting Friday at Eden Mill Nature Center in Pylesville. President Ann Helton said the nonprofit group had created a strategic plan that calls for strengthening operations, building support, increasing membership, maintaining a strong board of directors and increasing fund-raising efforts to deal with budget cuts.
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NEWS
January 13, 1991
After originally planning not to move forward, the state is now going ahead with plans to purchase the Greenway Gardens in Morgan Run, according to John Little, director of the Carroll County Department of Parks and Recreation.The state will use money from Program Open Space, a state program that uses real estate taxes to purchase land statewide, to purchase the 27-acre parcel.Greenway Gardens is the state's first major Carroll County land acquisition with open space money in years.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 24, 2004
The Maryland Board of Public Works has approved almost $3.7 million in funding for park and recreation projects in Baltimore. The Project Open Space money includes almost $2.5 million for maintenance, capital development and operation of the city's park system, state officials said. The spending was approved last week by the board, which comprises Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp. Other Program Open Space money approved by the board includes: $250,000 for interior renovation of Roosevelt Recreation Center in an 18-acre park on West 36th Street.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 24, 2004
The Maryland Board of Public Works has approved almost $3.7 million in funding for park and recreation projects in Baltimore. The Project Open Space money includes almost $2.5 million for maintenance, capital development and operation of the city's park system, state officials said. The spending was approved last week by the board, which comprises Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., Comptroller William Donald Schaefer and Treasurer Nancy K. Kopp. Other Program Open Space money approved by the board includes: $250,000 for interior renovation of Roosevelt Recreation Center in an 18-acre park on West 36th Street.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
Carroll County parks won't receive as much green from the state this year. The county's share of Program Open Space money for fiscal 2005 is $408,646, the least in at least a decade from the state fund that is generated by real estate sales to help pay for recreational projects throughout Maryland. In 2002, Carroll reached a high of more than $1.1 million in open space money, and it received nearly $1 million annually in 2000 and 2001. The amount has dropped considerably since then, falling below $500,000 for the year that began July 1. "It is appreciably less this year, our lowest allocation ever," said Steven Powell, the commissioner's chief of staff.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
Carroll County parks won't receive as much green from the state this year. The county's share of Program Open Space money for fiscal 2005 is $408,646, the lowest amount in at least a decade from the state fund that is generated by real estate sales to help pay for recreational projects throughout Maryland. In 2002, Carroll reached a high of more than $1.1 million in open space money, and it received nearly $1 million annually in 2000 and 2001. The amount has dropped considerably since then, falling below $500,000 for the year that began July 1. "It is appreciably less this year, our lowest allocation ever," said Steven Powell, the commissioner's chief of staff.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1994
Mount Airy's "Rails to Trails" project, to create a linear park connecting the east and west sides of town, is slated to receive nearly $40,000 in state open space money.County recreation and parks director Richard J. Soisson recommended to the county commissioners that Mount Airy and three other towns receive a total of $98,000 in open space funds to pay for individual town park projects.The "Rails to Trails" project in Mount Airy was developed as part of the town's 1994 master plan as a way to provide more recreational opportunities for residents and to preserve some of the undeveloped areas in town.
NEWS
March 26, 1993
Woman charged in filing false reportA 38-year-old Westminster woman who told police she was robbed earlier this month was charged yesterday with making a false report.Pamela D. Daniel, of the 200 block of E. Main St., was served with a criminal summons and will appear for a preliminary hearing May 10.The woman reported she was robbed of an undisclosed amount of money as she got out of her car near her house about 1:45 a.m. March 3.She told police the suspect held his hand in his pocket as though armed, and provided investigators with a composite sketch of the assailant.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | May 19, 1993
Carroll County will receive about $121,000 more tha expected from the state to spend on parks and other open space projects in the next fiscal year, the county budget director said yesterday.The governor included an extra $121,490 of Program Open Space money in his budget for Carroll, Budget Director Steven D. Powell said.The money will be added to $410,000 in open space money the county was scheduled to receive in fiscal 1994, which begins July 1.Carroll's towns will split about $28,000 of the additional money, and the county will use about $41,000 for land acquisition and about $53,000 for park development, Mr. Powell said.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2004
HERE IS the problem in a nutshell: In 2008, Maryland high schools will graduate the largest class in history. At least half of its students will want to go on to college. But Maryland's public colleges and universities don't have enough room for them. That's very simplistic, of course. Taken as a whole, Maryland higher education may have the room, but it's unevenly distributed. The University of Maryland, College Park, the flagship school, is full to the brim. The University of Maryland Eastern Shore has the space, but how many white kids from Howard County will cross the Bay Bridge to live and study at a historically black university?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
Carroll County parks won't receive as much green from the state this year. The county's share of Program Open Space money for fiscal 2005 is $408,646, the least in at least a decade from the state fund that is generated by real estate sales to help pay for recreational projects throughout Maryland. In 2002, Carroll reached a high of more than $1.1 million in open space money, and it received nearly $1 million annually in 2000 and 2001. The amount has dropped considerably since then, falling below $500,000 for the year that began July 1. "It is appreciably less this year, our lowest allocation ever," said Steven Powell, the commissioner's chief of staff.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2004
Carroll County parks won't receive as much green from the state this year. The county's share of Program Open Space money for fiscal 2005 is $408,646, the lowest amount in at least a decade from the state fund that is generated by real estate sales to help pay for recreational projects throughout Maryland. In 2002, Carroll reached a high of more than $1.1 million in open space money, and it received nearly $1 million annually in 2000 and 2001. The amount has dropped considerably since then, falling below $500,000 for the year that began July 1. "It is appreciably less this year, our lowest allocation ever," said Steven Powell, the commissioner's chief of staff.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | February 20, 2003
In a deal designed to put Baltimore's money-losing children's museum on solid financial footing, Port Discovery officials revealed yesterday a rescue plan that would allow the attraction to remain at its current Market Place home while leasing half its space to a city high school. The plan - a reversal of earlier proposals to move to a waterfront location - calls for the attraction to shrink by more than a third and to lease the freed-up space to the city public schools, already a tenant.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2001
The Carroll County commissioners unanimously adopted several enhancements to the county's 401(k) retirement plan yesterday, hoping to attract and retain quality government workers. Under the new guidelines, Carroll employees will be allowed to contribute to the 401(k) retirement plan immediately and will be eligible to receive the maximum match in county dollars after three years. The match is equivalent to up to 6 percent of the employee's annual salary, depending on the amount the employee contributes.
NEWS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1999
The state Board of Public Works awarded Westminster and Hampstead $63,641 yesterday from Program Open Space.Westminster received $23,891 to buy land on Main Street that will be developed into a meeting place for downtown shoppers.Hampstead received nearly $39,750 to buy land and install playground equipment next to a basketball court on West Street, the second phase of its Towne Centre Park project.In Westminster, a 2,500-square-foot plot in front of Locust Lane Mall and across Main Street from the Carroll County public library will be turned into a common area with landscaping, park benches and a directory of downtown businesses.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | November 4, 1993
Seibel's Field: It's not just ball fields any more.That's what New Windsor residents may be saying after the park at the west end of town gets a face lift -- including a new tot lot -- courtesy of a $17,868 grant from Program Open Space, a state program that helps develop recreational space."
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | June 19, 1991
Parks projects worth more than $550,000 in Carroll's towns could likely fall victim to the state's worsening budget woes.The General Assembly is expected to use more than $31 million of Program Open Space money to help patch a $109 million deficit in this year's budget, municipal leaders learned yesterday during a joint meeting in Annapolis of the House Appropriations and Senate Budget and Taxation committees.The hit will be the second taken by the Open Space fund this year, and it threatens at least six new projects in Carroll as well as several already under way. Earlier this year, Program Open Space financing was cut by $33 million.
NEWS
By Michael S. Derby and Michael S. Derby,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 1997
ANNAPOLIS - Three Western Maryland counties will get about $500,000 to maintain and expand local parks, the Board of Public Works has announced.The three-member board, led by Gov. Parris N. Glendening, approved the Program Open Space funds to both reimburse park- building efforts and support new park programs.The state's action will preserve the Holly Avenue Recreation Area, located in LaVale. The board approved about $170,000 for Allegany County to purchase the site.Currently owned by the Catholic Archdiocese of Baltimore and leased for almost four decades to the LaVale Athletic Association, Holly Avenue was in a prime location for residential development, said Patricia Manown, a spokeswoman for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
February 24, 1997
FARMLAND PRESERVATION is a cause with strong support in Maryland, where a number of counties rank among the most successful in the nation in that area.The state program, which has protected 117,000 agricultural acres from development, expects to spend $8 million this year on buying farm easements. Yet Maryland is able to purchase only one-quarter of the farms offered for easements each year.Legislation by Sen. Larry E. Haines, a Carroll County Republican, aims to accelerate farmland preservation by shifting earmarked tax money for parks to the state's Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation.
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