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By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Northrop Grumman broke ground Monday on a 25,00-square-foot facility specializing in cargo bound for space, the latest expansion to Maryland's slowly growing space industry. The $20 million center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be used to create and test space payloads and will feature a three-story, 6,000-square-foot clean room, a climate-controlled, air-locked facility where sensitive equipment can be made free of contaminants. That clean room will be the largest on the company's 129-acre campus in Anne Arundel County.
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BUSINESS
By Michael Bodley, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Northrop Grumman broke ground Monday on a 25,00-square-foot facility specializing in cargo bound for space, the latest expansion to Maryland's slowly growing space industry. The $20 million center near Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport will be used to create and test space payloads and will feature a three-story, 6,000-square-foot clean room, a climate-controlled, air-locked facility where sensitive equipment can be made free of contaminants. That clean room will be the largest on the company's 129-acre campus in Anne Arundel County.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its contractors are expected to eliminate more than 4,000 jobs by the end of the year because of the White House decision to scale back the space station, according to NASA and industry sources.The cutbacks from a work force of 11,000 will hit several areas hard. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace plans to lay off about 1,000 workers in Huntington Beach, Calif., Houston and St. Louis, a company official confirmed yesterday.McDonnell Douglas expects its subcontractors to let go another 1,000 workers, while cuts at Grumman Corp.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
Since October 2008, I have been calling on my colleagues in the House of Representatives to fix the unintended consequences associated with American satellite export regulations that treat all satellites and satellite parts - down to the nuts and bolts - as weapons. These outdated regulations known as the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or "ITAR," have cost the industry an estimated $21 billion in lost revenues and 28,000 jobs a year to European companies that have long been marketing their products as "ITAR-free.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
Hoping to tap into an economic engine that can weather the recession, Gov. Martin O'Malley unveiled a strategy Tuesday for bolstering the space industry's foothold in the state by lobbying for more federal dollars and emphasizing science and mathematics in schools. O'Malley, speaking to more than 500 aerospace industry representatives in Greenbelt, outlined a plan to harness what he characterized as the state's "unsung economic hero." The vision is similar to one the governor has articulated for the biotechnology industry as a way to further move the state from a manufacturing- to a knowledge-based economy.
NEWS
May 23, 2014
Since October 2008, I have been calling on my colleagues in the House of Representatives to fix the unintended consequences associated with American satellite export regulations that treat all satellites and satellite parts - down to the nuts and bolts - as weapons. These outdated regulations known as the International Traffic in Arms Regulations, or "ITAR," have cost the industry an estimated $21 billion in lost revenues and 28,000 jobs a year to European companies that have long been marketing their products as "ITAR-free.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies, with a chance of showers and thunderstorms this afternoon and a high temperature near 67 degrees. It is expected to be mostly cloudy tonight, with a slight chance of showers after 11 p.m., and a low temperature around 55 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Youths gather downtown Saturday; 10 arrested : Baltimore police called in extra officers and arrested at least 10 juveniles Saturday night as a crowd that witnesses described as rowdy and numbering in the hundreds walked around downtown.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
What lies at the center of that giant ball of gas we call Jupiter? When you cut through the incredibly dense atmosphere of Venus, what's happening on the planet surface? These are the questions that dance in the mind of Johns Hopkins University student Jessica Noviello. For her, they are not the idle musings of a child but a calling, pulling her life's path into space. "To think of being part of a mission that might answer things people have been wondering about for decades, that's very alluring," says Noviello, a sophomore from Smithtown, N.Y. Hopkins professors say this curiosity makes Noviello the perfect trailblazer for the university's new minor in space science and engineering.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Orbital Sciences Corp., which recently announced plans to consolidate its Maryland work force at a new location in Columbia, saw its shares rise by 19 percent yesterday after it announced that it had won a five-year satellite-manufacturing contract from NASA worth as much as $1.5 billion.It was unclear yesterday how much of the work related to the new contract, if any, might fall to local employees.The Dulles, Va.-based company, which is expected to generate more than $900 million in revenue this year, is planning to move more than 200 jobs from Germantown and Linthicum to the new Columbia location by June.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1998
Maryland institutions would play prominent roles in four of the five interplanetary science missions under final review for funding by NASA.As proposed, the missions' spacecraft would grab samples of Mars' moons, blast open a comet, fly instruments to Mercury and study the atmosphere of Venus."
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
WEATHER Today's forecast calls for mostly cloudy skies, with a chance of showers and thunderstorms this afternoon and a high temperature near 67 degrees. It is expected to be mostly cloudy tonight, with a slight chance of showers after 11 p.m., and a low temperature around 55 degrees. TRAFFIC Check our traffic updates for this morning's issues as you plan your commute. FROM THE WEEKEND... Youths gather downtown Saturday; 10 arrested : Baltimore police called in extra officers and arrested at least 10 juveniles Saturday night as a crowd that witnesses described as rowdy and numbering in the hundreds walked around downtown.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
What lies at the center of that giant ball of gas we call Jupiter? When you cut through the incredibly dense atmosphere of Venus, what's happening on the planet surface? These are the questions that dance in the mind of Johns Hopkins University student Jessica Noviello. For her, they are not the idle musings of a child but a calling, pulling her life's path into space. "To think of being part of a mission that might answer things people have been wondering about for decades, that's very alluring," says Noviello, a sophomore from Smithtown, N.Y. Hopkins professors say this curiosity makes Noviello the perfect trailblazer for the university's new minor in space science and engineering.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
Hoping to tap into an economic engine that can weather the recession, Gov. Martin O'Malley unveiled a strategy Tuesday for bolstering the space industry's foothold in the state by lobbying for more federal dollars and emphasizing science and mathematics in schools. O'Malley, speaking to more than 500 aerospace industry representatives in Greenbelt, outlined a plan to harness what he characterized as the state's "unsung economic hero." The vision is similar to one the governor has articulated for the biotechnology industry as a way to further move the state from a manufacturing- to a knowledge-based economy.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1999
Orbital Sciences Corp., which recently announced plans to consolidate its Maryland work force at a new location in Columbia, saw its shares rise by 19 percent yesterday after it announced that it had won a five-year satellite-manufacturing contract from NASA worth as much as $1.5 billion.It was unclear yesterday how much of the work related to the new contract, if any, might fall to local employees.The Dulles, Va.-based company, which is expected to generate more than $900 million in revenue this year, is planning to move more than 200 jobs from Germantown and Linthicum to the new Columbia location by June.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1998
Maryland institutions would play prominent roles in four of the five interplanetary science missions under final review for funding by NASA.As proposed, the missions' spacecraft would grab samples of Mars' moons, blast open a comet, fly instruments to Mercury and study the atmosphere of Venus."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its contractors are expected to eliminate more than 4,000 jobs by the end of the year because of the White House decision to scale back the space station, according to NASA and industry sources.The cutbacks from a work force of 11,000 will hit several areas hard. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace plans to lay off about 1,000 workers in Huntington Beach, Calif., Houston and St. Louis, a company official confirmed yesterday.McDonnell Douglas expects its subcontractors to let go another 1,000 workers, while cuts at Grumman Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | June 22, 1992
It was Jules Verne who first recognized this region's aerospace potential.He picked Baltimore as the site for his 1866 novel, "From the Earth to the Moon," about a group of men -- members of the influential Gun Club -- who build a cannon to shoot three men, two dogs and two chickens to the moon.It was a prophetic choice. Less than a century later, the Baltimore area took a leading role in the birth of the nation's space program. The Viking rocket, which once held the world altitude record, was built by the Martin Co. (now Martin Marietta Corp.
NEWS
January 6, 2011
In his ill-written and wrong-headed column, U.S. Rep. C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger makes an unconvincing argument to revive the U.S. space program, using the usual chauvinistic, jingoistic and saber-rattling catchwords that we've come to expect from the warmongering Democratic Party leadership he represents ( "Relaunch the space program," Jan. 5). Why do we need to return to the moon, much less go to Mars? He doesn't say, except that the Chinese are going to first, notwithstanding the fact that we already were there in 1969.
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