Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpace Exploration
IN THE NEWS

Space Exploration

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 3, 2011
As a child, I remember a coloring book that pictured a "Buck Rogers" rocket that looked like a football with three fins at its base. It was my job to give it life by coloring the rocket blast with yellows, oranges and reds that lifted the craft to stellar flight and imagined adventures. The book was filled with such renderings and each page held a new mission to be wondered at. Years later came Alan Shepard, Walter "Wally" Shirra Jr., John Glenn Jr., and tragically Virgil "Gus" Grissom who later died in an Apollo 1 pre-launch test.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 29, 2014
If my tax dollars were being spent on hard research generating hard scientific data and conclusions, I might be somewhat less offended at this taxpayer waste ( "Morgan State warned of problems with its largest research program," June 25). However, Morgan researchers "study" ecosystems in order to develop "media outreach" (public relations) "to engage the public with stories of NASA's space exploration. " Fluff! Why not write a book or issue a public service announcement? If President Barack Obama and Congress are looking to trim waste (of course, they are not)
Advertisement
NEWS
December 24, 1995
AMERICANS MAY NOT have noticed, but in the past month the yin-yang argument over the direction of U.S. space exploration was played out before them. Amid the quiet debate over whether robotic spacecraft should take precedence over more expensive and dangerous manned space flights, each type of mission had a success.In November, the shuttle Atlantis was docked for eight days to the Russian space station Mir. It was one more experiment toward building a U.S. space station that will give this nation a continuous manned presence in space.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | October 22, 2013
I recently had a chance to watch the space-themed film "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney. Leaving aside the multitude of technical errors in the film, as someone who has consulted in the space business for a number years, I always welcome it when Hollywood brings much needed attention to human spaceflight and its importance to us as a people and a nation. That said, as the film played, I wondered if others would also find the casting and script as ironic and troubling as I did. While Ms. Bullock works hard to keep her political views private while quite possibly being the most decent and generous person in the film business, Mr. Clooney has never made it a secret that he is an enthusiastic supporter of Barack Obama and the Democratic Party.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Birch and Douglas M. Birch,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1997
If the Pathfinder spacecraft's exploration of the terra-cotta martian terrain proves anything, it's that the Soviet Union didn't win the space race. Neither did the United States.Robots won it, and seem to be widening their lead.When someone finally sets a well-insulated boot on the frigid martian surface, she or he is likely to be greeted by a menagerie of smart and at least partly autonomous rovers, weather stations and other gadgets.This state of affairs irritates some earthlings. No serious work gets done, they insist, until humans arrive.
TRAVEL
By Ron Driscoll and By Ron Driscoll,BOSTON GLOBE | January 7, 2001
"I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon. ... In a very real sense, it will not be one man going to the moon ... it will be an entire nation. For all of us must work to put him there." -- John F. Kennedy, May 25, 1961 The 45-rpm record had long gathered dust on a bookshelf of my mother's home. This rendition of "Man on the Moon" was recorded not by the rock group R.E.M. but by CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite, and it stirs memories of a euphoric time in the United States, man's first landing on the moon in 1969.
NEWS
September 27, 1996
THE EARTH that astronaut Shannon Lucid returned to yesterday was not the same one she left 188 days before. The old Earth included a United States that had boldly committed to sending a man to Mars by 2019, a very expensive proposition.While Ms. Lucid was in space President Clinton shifted policy from that set by his predecessor, George Bush. No longer is the stated goal of NASA a manned flight to Mars, though that remains a more distant possibility. The emphasis will instead be on safer and less costly robotic missions through the solar system.
FEATURES
By New York Bureau | March 3, 1993
NEW YORK -- When the first U.S. commercial rocket lifts off in May, its payload will be emblazoned with the cryptic message, "Last Action Hero."A warning to space aliens? A pessimistic comment on the future of space exploration?How about a commercial for an Arnold Schwarzenegger film?Improbable but true, the rocket's payload will carry the title of Mr. Schwarzenegger's action adventure, while the four boosters will be graced with the star's long name.The unlikely advertising venue came about when the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's commercial arm -- Commercial Experimental Transport, or COMET -- decided to defray costs of its first commercial launch by renting space to advertisers.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,sun reporter | December 17, 2006
The Naval Academy Foundation is going to new heights to highlight the school's long-standing connection with space exploration, hosting a live online radio show tomorrow featuring nine graduates-turned-astronauts, including two who will talk from the International Space Station. The program will precede the academy's latest effort to bring that connection into the classroom: On Tuesday and Wednesday, three satellites built by midshipmen will be launched into orbit from the space shuttle Discovery.
NEWS
January 4, 1997
IT BECOMES CLEARER daily that the Russians aren't capable of fulfilling the ambitious role set for them in efforts to make space exploration international.Chronic fiscal problems left by the former Soviet Union are preventing Russia from meeting deadlines in construction of the space station. Funding may have been a factor in whatever technical problem caused Russia's Mars 96 spacecraft to fall back to Earth only hours after blasting off in November. The Russian probe was to be part of a three-pronged exploration of the Red Planet that included two U.S. probes which were successfully launched.
NEWS
September 23, 2013
This week, a commercial "freighter" rocket that began its journey into space last Wednesday about 35 miles south of Ocean City is due to dock with the International Space Station, delivering 1,300 pounds of cargo. It will eventually be loaded up with trash and sent on its way to burn up on atmospheric re-entry over the South Pacific. Cygnus isn't the first unmanned rocket to be launched out of NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Va., which has been in the research rocket business since World War II. But it may be among the most highly anticipated.
EXPLORE
May 6, 2013
The Glenn L. Martin Maryland Aviation Museum has been taking the Glenn L. Martin Company rocket age history on the road to Harford County. Thanks to support from the Dresher Foundation, the museum is offering its outreach STEM education program "From Sand Dunes to the Moon" to third grade classes at Harford County elementary schools. This interactive activity celebrating flight and Maryland's contribution to the pioneering days of manned space exploration is designed to launch excitement for aerospace possibilities as it inspires students to explore the future of aviation while they discover and learn to appreciate the technological wonders of the past.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
NASA announced plans Tuesday for a mission to explore the interior of Mars, passing over two finalist proposals from Maryland institutions for the space agency's next relatively low-cost space mission. InSight, a project of the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab in California, is set to launch in 2016 with the goal of examining Mars' core and crust to help scientists understand how planets form and evolve. NASA selected the mission instead of a proposal by the University of Maryland, College Park to study a comet and another from a Laytonsville company to explore Saturn's largest moon.
NEWS
September 3, 2011
As a child, I remember a coloring book that pictured a "Buck Rogers" rocket that looked like a football with three fins at its base. It was my job to give it life by coloring the rocket blast with yellows, oranges and reds that lifted the craft to stellar flight and imagined adventures. The book was filled with such renderings and each page held a new mission to be wondered at. Years later came Alan Shepard, Walter "Wally" Shirra Jr., John Glenn Jr., and tragically Virgil "Gus" Grissom who later died in an Apollo 1 pre-launch test.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
In an age of austerity, can the United States still afford, in "Star Trek's" memorable phrase, "to boldly go where no man has gone before"? The answer: maybe. The space shuttle program - that long-running, always slightly disappointing successor to the thrilling Apollo moon missions - is no more. The Obama administration has made it plain that the future of human spaceflight, at least in the near term, will consist of federal partnerships with private enterprise. Entrepreneurs (that is, those whose bottom line is not to advance scientific discovery but to make a buck)
NEWS
July 20, 2011
How fitting the crew of NASA's final space shuttle mission will end almost 42 years to the day men set foot on the moon. On July 20, 1969 Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first humans to visit earth's closest neighbor in space. I'm fortunate to be able to recall that July evening in 1969 when the world held its breath as the Eagle landed on that airless world. Although Neil Armstrong and Buzz Armstrong planted the American flag on the lunar surface, I give credit to the Russians for making the "one small step for man" possible.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2001
Morgan Murray could be spending her final weeks of summer frolicking under a sprinkler or jumping into a pool. Instead, the 10-year-old Pikesville resident has spent the past two weeks studying Spanish. Morgan is one of about two dozen children ages 6 to 12 who are taking college-style courses at the Catonsville campus of the Community College of Baltimore County. In addition to Spanish, pupils dived into journalism or space exploration during the two-week "learning adventure camp," which ends today.
NEWS
July 8, 1996
OF ALL THE experiments in space exploration, this nation may have begun the most daring Tuesday with the awarding of a revolutionary contract to Lockheed Martin Corp. to build a new version of the space shuttle. More exciting than the company's new arrowhead design for a completely reuseable shuttle is the prospect that private industry will assume the central role in American space exploration. That has been a stated goal of NASA administrator Daniel S. Goldin, a former TRW Inc. executive who believes privatization is key to cutting the cost of space travel.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
I find the outlook for NASA over the next decade by Waleed Abdalati and Robert Braun to be very narrow minded, self-serving and steeped in false hope ("After space shuttle program, NASA's future still bright," July 4). I can see how as NASA's chief technologist and chief scientist, they would welcome an increase in funding in their respective areas, but they must face reality. In this unsettled budgetary environment, unfocused investments in science and technology are ripe for cuts and outright deletion.
NEWS
By Waleed Abdalati and Robert Braun | July 4, 2011
With the final flight of the stalwart space shuttle Atlantis just a few days away, America is beginning an exciting new chapter in human space exploration. This chapter centers on full utilization of the International Space Station, development of multiple, made-in-America capabilities for astronauts and cargo to reach low-Earth orbit, and pursuit of two critical building blocks for our nation's exploration future: a deep space crew vehicle and an evolvable, heavy-lift rocket. Today, we embark on a new knowledge and innovation-driven approach to space science and exploration that will lead us into the new frontiers of deep space.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.