Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSpace Camp
IN THE NEWS

Space Camp

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 2, 1992
Young viewers of WGN, on North Arundel Cable TV channel 3, can watch"The Cosmic Challenge . . . For Kid's Sake," to learn about space, and enter a contest to win a trip to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Space Camp in Huntsville, Ala.The show will bebroadcast at 8 p.m. Feb. 3.Viewers who learn enough about space to answer nine questions cansend their answers to WGN's Cosmic Challenge, 2501 Bradley Plcae, Chicago, Ill. 60618, by 5...
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Maryland officials should get more economic bang from the Wallops Flight Facility — just over the line in Virginia — by capitalizing on space tourism and the potential from unmanned aircraft, according to a new study. The report, commissioned by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, said the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's complex on Wallops Island already has an effect on Maryland's Eastern Shore. But there's potential for more. One possibility: attracting more people to see rockets blasted into space from Wallops.
Advertisement
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2006
Broadneck Elementary School teacher Katie Maloney loves outer space. Last summer, she was one of 144 teachers from all over the world to win a weeklong, all-expenses-paid trip to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., organized by technology giant Honeywell International. This summer, though, she's done even better: She was one of only 16 teachers worldwide - and the only one on the East Coast - to attend an advanced space camp, again sponsored by Honeywell. Participants got to tour Cape Canaveral in Florida, experience weightlessness and participate in a mock mission.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
Close to 100 middle-schoolers from Howard and Frederick counties gathered at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel recently for the 10th annual Space Academy, which employees at the facility hope will encourage the students to pursue a career in space exploration, math and science. The event, which is sponsored by the laboratory and the Science Channel, gives students a behind-the-scenes look at real space missions. It also allows the students to meet people responsible for some of NASA's projects.
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 2004
As 36-year-old Howard Eakes sat in one of NASA's anti-gravity chairs, he realized the dream of the wide-eyed millions who, since its Kennedy-era development, have looked upon the space program in awe. Eakes was training to be an astronaut. He won't be blasting off into space anytime soon, but July 6 through July 11, Eakes, a fifth-grade teacher at Fountain Green Elementary School who also appears up to two days a week on the Harford Cable Network's live homework show, traveled to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., for the U.S. Space Academy for Educators Camp - in short, space camp.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2005
Catherine Maloney's friends have been teasing her, saying she's the only person they know who would rave about a trip to Alabama in steamy-hot July. But Maloney said she would gladly go in August if it meant participating in space camp again. Maloney, who teaches fourth grade at Broadneck Elementary School in Arnold, just returned from a week at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center Space Camp in Huntsville. "I can't stop talking about it to all my friends," she said. "I think it's going to infuse my teaching with so much enthusiasm."
NEWS
July 29, 1999
Michele Lawrence, a 1995 graduate of Liberty High School, is spending part of the summer in Huntsville, Ala., teaching high school students who are attending the U.S. Space Camp Program.A student at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Fla., she is an honor student and will be inducted into the Order of Omega Greek Honor Society in the fall.She is president of Zeta Chi Sorority and a member of the American Institute of Astronautics and Aeronautics and Students for Exploration and Development of Space.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1994
Oakland Mills resident David Brain still has longings to fulfill his quixotic childhood dream to be the first human on Mars.While Mr. Brain, 21, a Rice University senior, won't be launching into another orbit anytime soon, an experiment he helped design to analyze the effects of gravity on early stages of plant growth will. Mr. Brain's "Get Away Special Canister" experiment -- or GAS Can -- will be in the cargo bay of NASA's Endeavor space shuttle mission scheduled for launch Aug. 18 at Cape Canaveral, Fla.The experiment designed by Mr. Brain and several partners calls for four types of fast-germinating vegetable seeds -- tomato, lettuce, radish and turnip -- to be placed in a small canister, where they will be nourished through automated devices over nine days in space.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | September 4, 1994
Kerri B. Beisser will fly. She's known since she was 8.The 20-year-old Finksburg resident has been planning her career since the Christmas 12 years ago when she used gift money to buy a $12.99 telescope and take a closer look at the heavens."
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
When he was in middle school, Dr. Bernard A. Harris Jr. dreamed of living in space. A month ago, he logged 239 hours in space during the shuttle Discovery's rendezvous mission with a Russian space station.Yesterday, he told a group of MacArthur Middle School students that space could be in their future, too, if they study hard and hold onto their dreams."I wouldn't have any of these opportunities without one thing: I had a dream about living in space," said the 38-year-old astronaut. The 30-minute talk, one of a string of motivational speeches Dr. Harris delivers, was his fourth of the day.Earlier he spoke at schools in suburban Washington and later in the afternoon he would speak at Pershing Hill Elementary School, where he has a family connection.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 2006
Broadneck Elementary School teacher Katie Maloney loves outer space. Last summer, she was one of 144 teachers from all over the world to win a weeklong, all-expenses-paid trip to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., organized by technology giant Honeywell International. This summer, though, she's done even better: She was one of only 16 teachers worldwide - and the only one on the East Coast - to attend an advanced space camp, again sponsored by Honeywell. Participants got to tour Cape Canaveral in Florida, experience weightlessness and participate in a mock mission.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 17, 2005
Catherine Maloney's friends have been teasing her, saying she's the only person they know who would rave about a trip to Alabama in steamy-hot July. But Maloney said she would gladly go in August if it meant participating in space camp again. Maloney, who teaches fourth grade at Broadneck Elementary School in Arnold, just returned from a week at the U.S. Space and Rocket Center Space Camp in Huntsville. "I can't stop talking about it to all my friends," she said. "I think it's going to infuse my teaching with so much enthusiasm."
NEWS
By Sarah Merkey and Sarah Merkey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 25, 2004
As 36-year-old Howard Eakes sat in one of NASA's anti-gravity chairs, he realized the dream of the wide-eyed millions who, since its Kennedy-era development, have looked upon the space program in awe. Eakes was training to be an astronaut. He won't be blasting off into space anytime soon, but July 6 through July 11, Eakes, a fifth-grade teacher at Fountain Green Elementary School who also appears up to two days a week on the Harford Cable Network's live homework show, traveled to the U.S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala., for the U.S. Space Academy for Educators Camp - in short, space camp.
NEWS
July 29, 1999
Michele Lawrence, a 1995 graduate of Liberty High School, is spending part of the summer in Huntsville, Ala., teaching high school students who are attending the U.S. Space Camp Program.A student at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Fla., she is an honor student and will be inducted into the Order of Omega Greek Honor Society in the fall.She is president of Zeta Chi Sorority and a member of the American Institute of Astronautics and Aeronautics and Students for Exploration and Development of Space.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
When he was in middle school, Dr. Bernard A. Harris Jr. dreamed of living in space. A month ago, he logged 239 hours in space during the shuttle Discovery's rendezvous mission with a Russian space station.Yesterday, he told a group of MacArthur Middle School students that space could be in their future, too, if they study hard and hold onto their dreams."I wouldn't have any of these opportunities without one thing: I had a dream about living in space," said the 38-year-old astronaut. The 30-minute talk, one of a string of motivational speeches Dr. Harris delivers, was his fourth of the day.Earlier he spoke at schools in suburban Washington and later in the afternoon he would speak at Pershing Hill Elementary School, where he has a family connection.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | September 4, 1994
Kerri B. Beisser will fly. She's known since she was 8.The 20-year-old Finksburg resident has been planning her career since the Christmas 12 years ago when she used gift money to buy a $12.99 telescope and take a closer look at the heavens."
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2014
Maryland officials should get more economic bang from the Wallops Flight Facility — just over the line in Virginia — by capitalizing on space tourism and the potential from unmanned aircraft, according to a new study. The report, commissioned by the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, said the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's complex on Wallops Island already has an effect on Maryland's Eastern Shore. But there's potential for more. One possibility: attracting more people to see rockets blasted into space from Wallops.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1994
Oakland Mills resident David Brain still has longings to fulfill his quixotic childhood dream to be the first human on Mars.While Mr. Brain, 21, a Rice University senior, won't be launching into another orbit anytime soon, an experiment he helped design to analyze the effects of gravity on early stages of plant growth will. Mr. Brain's "Get Away Special Canister" experiment -- or GAS Can -- will be in the cargo bay of NASA's Endeavor space shuttle mission scheduled for launch Aug. 18 at Cape Canaveral, Fla.The experiment designed by Mr. Brain and several partners calls for four types of fast-germinating vegetable seeds -- tomato, lettuce, radish and turnip -- to be placed in a small canister, where they will be nourished through automated devices over nine days in space.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.