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NEWS
April 13, 1995
Edward B. Crosland, 83, a former senior executive of AT&T Corp. who chaired the board of the Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, died Tuesday of bone marrow failure and complications from anemia. As chairman of the Vienna, Va., foundation, he led supporters of the only U.S. national park for the performing arts.Annie Fischer, 80, one of Hungary's greatest pianists, died Monday in Budapest. A child prodigy, she won the first Franz Liszt piano competition in 1933 and played in major concert halls in Europe, the United States and Australia.
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NEWS
August 24, 2008
The Russian invasion of Georgia complicated what was already a major headache for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration: how to get to and from the International Space Station, which was funded mostly by U.S. taxpayer dollars, after NASA's aging fleet of space shuttles retires in 2010. NASA expected Russian rockets to ferry its astronauts between 2010 and 2015, when the shuttle's replacement is due to fly. But a chill in U.S.-Russian relations could throw a monkey wrench into that plan.
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FEATURES
May 17, 1992
Vice Admiral John A. Baldwin Jr., who was born in Baltimore and attended school here, is retiring from the U.S. Navy Oct. 1 after 37 years of active service. He is currently serving as president of the National Defense University at Fort Lesley J. McNair in Washington.*Sekai R. Chideya of Forest Park, who is a life sciences major at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania, is one of 48 students selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to participate in a six-week Space Life Sciences training program at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | May 7, 2008
Herbert J. Fivehouse, a retired administrator in the space exploration program of the 1960s, died of pneumonia complications April 30 at Brook Grove Retirement Center in Sandy Springs. The Towson resident was 92. Born in Patterson, N.J., he moved to Baltimore's Hamilton neighborhood in 1939. During World War II, he worked for General Motors and the Army Signal Corps. After the war, he joined the Air Force Research and Development Command and NASA, where he became director of administration at the Goddard Space Flight Center.
BUSINESS
December 27, 1990
General Sciences Corp.Graduating from the federal government's set-aside programs for small and minority-owned companies can be bad for business, General Sciences Corp. has learned.The Laurel-based government contractor reported sharply lower sales and earnings in its first fiscal quarter, which ended Oct. 31, because it had become too big to receive special treatment from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, said Lily Chen, vice president.The company, which specializes in providing weather and environmental research, said its graduation from the Small Business Administration's 8(a)
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 1998
MIAMI -- Insisting that you're never too old for high-flying adventure, John Glenn -- the first American to orbit Earth and an influential senator -- is this close to blasting back into space this year.At the age of 77.The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is leaning toward approving his 10-day flight aboard shuttle Discovery in October. A decision could come in a few days."We're certainly looking at it," NASA spokesman Brian Welch said yesterday. "We take him seriously. There's a lot of buzz about it around here."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | December 24, 1994
NASA has selected a Johns Hopkins University design for a $30 million camera to be installed in the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope in 1999.The Hubble Advanced Camera for Exploration (HACE) will be a major advance over the telescope's current camera, the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2. That instrument was installed during the space shuttle Endeavour's rescue mission last December.HACE will greatly enhance the telescope's "superlative imaging capabilities well into the next century," said Dr. Edward Weiler, NASA's Hubble program scientist.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | January 9, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Some sections of the upcoming international space station, especially those built by Russia, may be more vulnerable to damage by meteoroids and space junk than the rest of the structure, according to a study by the National Research Council released yesterday.The panel called for improved shielding on the station modules in question and urged the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its partners to work more closely in planning emergency procedures in the event of a damaging collision.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its contractors are expected to eliminate more than 4,000 jobs by the end of the year because of the White House decision to scale back the space station, according to NASA and industry sources.The cutbacks from a work force of 11,000 will hit several areas hard. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace plans to lay off about 1,000 workers in Huntington Beach, Calif., Houston and St. Louis, a company official confirmed yesterday.McDonnell Douglas expects its subcontractors to let go another 1,000 workers, while cuts at Grumman Corp.
NEWS
March 13, 1992
James W. Chapman Sr., a retired equal employment opportunity specialist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, died of cancer Sunday at the Fort Howard Veterans Hospital. He was 64 and resided on North Denison Street.Services for Mr. Chapman were being held today at Union Baptist Church, 1219 Druid Hill Ave.He retired in 1986 after working more than 20 years at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt. Earlier, he was a civilian employee of the Army and of the Coast Guard.
NEWS
By Gwyneth K. Shaw and Gwyneth K. Shaw,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 12, 2005
WASHINGTON - President Bush chose Michael D. Griffin yesterday to be the new head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, putting a scientist with technical and management expertise in charge of the space program's ambitious plans to go back to the moon and on to Mars. Griffin, 55, who is director of the space department at the John Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory, must be confirmed by the U.S. Senate to become the 11th administrator of NASA. But early congressional reaction was effusive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By New York Times News Service | May 2, 2004
Urgent: HQ Direction," began a message e-mailed on April 1 to dozens of scientists and officials at the Goddard Space Flight Center of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in Greenbelt. It was not an alert about an incoming asteroid, a problem with the space station, or a solar storm. It was a warning about a movie. In The Day After Tomorrow, a $125 million disaster film that is to open on May 28, global warming from accumulating smokestack and tailpipe gases sets off an instant ice age. Few climate experts think such a prospect is likely, especially in the near future.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2003
After waking up Saturday morning to the space shuttle Columbia breaking apart on national television, the events staff at Baltimore-Washington International Airport figured they'd have to find a new speaker for their annual Black History Month event. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's deputy administrator, Frederick D. Gregory, would surely be too busy, too broken up to tell a crowd of strangers about his life spent overcoming the obstacles that history had placed in his way. He would be shuttling between Houston and Washington, consoling the grieving families and supervising an investigation into what went wrong aboard the ill-fated mission.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 3, 2003
KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - Felix Alberto Soto Toro still wants to be an astronaut, now more than ever. He has dreamed of floating among the stars since he was 6. As a student at Florida Institute of Technology 17 years ago, he watched the Challenger explode. But he dug in: He joined the National Aeronautics and Space Administration that same year, went on to earn a doctorate in electrical engineering and is now taking flying lessons. The loss of the shuttle Columbia on Saturday was brutal.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Lifting a budget threat aimed at the Goddard Space Flight Center, Senate appropriators sidestepped spending limits yesterday to restore almost $300 million cut by the House.Under a plan devised by Senate Republican leaders, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration would receive the full $13.5 billion sought by President Clinton for the agency.Though the issue is still far from final resolution, the Senate action almost certainly protects the Maryland-based space facility from layoffs or canceled contracts, as some had feared.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1999
First-quarter net income at AlliedSignal Inc. rose 12 percent compared with the same portion of last year, the company said yesterday.Its $335 million in net income, or 59 cents per diluted share, was a first-quarter record for the New Jersey conglomerate and beat last year's mark of $300 million or 52 cents per share.The rise came despite several divestitures that took place in 1998, including the sale to Raytheon Co. of a military electronics plant in Towson. Total sales for the first quarter were $3.6 billion, down 1 percent from the year-ago period.
NEWS
October 4, 1995
Charles Lacy Veach, an astronaut and two-time space flier, died yesterday of complications from cancer at his home in Houston, NASA said. He was 51.Mr. Veach had not flown in space since 1992. He helped operate telescopes during a military mission aboard Discovery in 1991 and flew again the next year on a science mission by Columbia.The former Air Force fighter pilot flew 275 combat missions in Vietnam. He later was a member of the Air Force air demonstration squadron, the Thunderbirds, before leaving active duty in 1981.
NEWS
By Christian Science Monitor | August 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- For space-faring nations, the watchword is "togetherness." It was heard throughout the cavernous Washington Convention Center as the World Space Congress got under way yesterday.For the first time, virtually every nation with interest in space or its practical benefits has sent delegates to an international space conference. Almost 4,000 representatives have settled into a week of meetings that have the air of a celebration in honor of a historic change of eras.The opening phase of the Space Age, with the Cold War hostilities that restricted free sharing of knowledge and technology, is over.
FEATURES
By Rachel Elson and Rachel Elson,special to the sun | June 14, 1998
SAN FRANCISCO - It has sounded, at times, like the ultimate adventure trip gone haywire. Or maybe a deadly, space-age spinoff of "Gilligan's Island": Soar into the ether! See the world from 250 miles above the Earth! Brush up on your Russian as you battle fires, midair collisions, power failures and the deep, dark abyss of space itself!Over the last year and a half of joint U.S.-Russian missions on Mir - which ended last week when the shuttle picked up astronaut Andrew Thomas - the weary space station has become widely regarded as having the performance, safety and engineering of, well, a Ford Pinto.
NEWS
February 19, 1998
DURING the Apollo missions, it seemed almost unpatriotic to ask how much it was costing to put a man on the moon and bring him home safely. But the need for deficit reduction erased that shyness. NASA has seen its budget cut almost every year since 1992. The space agency has had to scale back projects, reduce its work force and be more precise about spending. Cost overruns still occur, but a leaner NASA appeared to be keeping them within reason.That was an illusion. Confidence in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was shaken to the core last week by news that space station Alpha is already $3.6 billion over budget.
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