Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSoyuz
IN THE NEWS

Soyuz

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2003
MOSCOW - As a U.S.-Russian crew returned to Moscow yesterday after a rough and off-target Soyuz spaceship landing, officials said a commission will investigate what went wrong with the craft's descent from the International Space Station. The spacecraft landed safely in Kazakstan early yesterday using a backup procedure that involved a steeper fall to Earth and placed greater gravitational stress on the occupants. It landed north of the Aral Sea, about 290 miles short of the intended site.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
Thanks to his unabashed enthusiasm for the job and his way with a tweet, Cockeysville's Reid Wiseman is becoming quite the Twitterverse celebrity as he orbits the Earth on the International Space Station. Almost from the moment he arrived at the station May 29, Wiseman, 38, has been posting photographs and commentary to his Twitter feed (his handle is @astro_reid). Even before his Soyuz flight took off May 28, Wiseman was posting selfies, including some featuring his crew mates German astronaut Alexander Gerst and Russian cosmonaut Maxim Suraev.
Advertisement
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 27, 2003
MOSCOW - The glitch that caused a Soyuz space capsule to come to earth more than 300 miles from its intended landing point early this month has still not been identified, Russian officials said yesterday. The head of a panel that investigated the off-course landing said at a news conference that although the exact flaw was not known, its chances of recurring were small and that future Soyuz passengers were at no extra risk. The Soyuz has been the only manned link with the International Space Station since the disintegration of the space shuttle Columbia in February.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Los Angeles Times | July 28, 2007
NASA officials vowed yesterday to investigate reports that astronauts were drunk before missions on at least two occasions, but several former astronauts questioned the claims, saying that they were too closely monitored to risk breaking the rules on drinking before a flight. "I didn't see any use of alcohol that infringed safety," said Tom Jones, who served on four shuttle missions before retiring in 2001. "I didn't see any flight surgeons who would have hesitated to blow the whistle."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 30, 2005
MOSCOW - At a time when American manned missions have been suspended because of design flaws in the space shuttle, Russian authorities want to spin past the moon with a humble vehicle now serving as NASA's space taxi. Not only are Russian officials planning their nation's first lunar fly-by, according to Russian media reports, but they hope to make the mission at least partly self-financing by selling a seat aboard the venerable Soyuz spacecraft for $100 million. Where the shuttle is like a winged, spacious space SUV, Russia's Soyuz is an insect-like three-seater compact based on a 1960s design.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 1, 1991
MOSCOW -- One is a sharp-tongued army colonel who says that if he were Soviet president, he would show President Bush )) who's boss by putting Soviet strategic weapons on alert.A second comrade belongs to a shady reactionary group that tried to overthrow the democratically elected government in the Baltic republic of Latvia. A third is committed to fighting for the rights of ethnic Russians in places where they are a minority and branded "Soviet occupiers."These are not the members of a freakish political cult, but duly elected lawmakers and leaders of Soyuz, or "Union," the Soviet Parliament's right-wing faction, which is steadily gaining power and influence inside the Kremlin.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2003
MOSCOW - Offering a multinational display of bravura, the three-man crew of the Soyuz space capsule met with the news media yesterday and shrugged off the notion that their steep plunge to Earth in a malfunctioning spaceship Sunday was riskier than any other weekend drive. The two U.S. astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut, clad in identical blue coveralls, spent 40 minutes talking about the sweet smell of Kazakstan earth after 5 1/2 months in space, the strangeness of slithering out of their capsule with muscles that had forgotten gravity and the joy of seeing their wives.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 2003
MOSCOW - Fearing that the international space station might have to be left in orbit without a crew, the Russian government yesterday accelerated funding to build space vehicles. Yuri Koptev, director of the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, told reporters that the Russian Cabinet has approved the early release of $38 million that was budgeted for the second half of the year. The government also tentatively promised to increase the agency's budget to $240 million next year from $130 million this year, he said.
FEATURES
June 30, 2007
June 30 1936 Gone with the Wind was published. 1971 A Soviet space mission ended in tragedy when three cosmonauts aboard Soyuz 11 were found dead inside their spacecraft.
FEATURES
January 10, 1998
Today in history: Jan. 10In 1776, Thomas Paine published his influential pamphlet, "Common Sense."In 1861, Florida seceded from the Union.In 1870, John D. Rockefeller incorporated Standard Oil.In 1928, the Soviet Union ordered the exile of Leon Trotsky.In 1946, the first General Assembly of the United Nations convened in London.In 1978, the Soviet Union launched two cosmonauts aboard a Soyuz capsule for a rendezvous with the Salyut VI space lab.Associated PressPub Date: 1/10/98
FEATURES
June 30, 2007
June 30 1936 Gone with the Wind was published. 1971 A Soviet space mission ended in tragedy when three cosmonauts aboard Soyuz 11 were found dead inside their spacecraft.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 30, 2005
MOSCOW - At a time when American manned missions have been suspended because of design flaws in the space shuttle, Russian authorities want to spin past the moon with a humble vehicle now serving as NASA's space taxi. Not only are Russian officials planning their nation's first lunar fly-by, according to Russian media reports, but they hope to make the mission at least partly self-financing by selling a seat aboard the venerable Soyuz spacecraft for $100 million. Where the shuttle is like a winged, spacious space SUV, Russia's Soyuz is an insect-like three-seater compact based on a 1960s design.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration, forced to weigh its space program against efforts to keep Iran's nuclear ambitions in check, is asking Congress for special permission to buy services it will need for the International Space Station. Without congressional action, U.S. astronauts would have to vacate the space station next spring except for short visits: the law forbids the purchase of transportation services from Russia because of its cooperation in Iran's quest for nuclear power, said NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2004
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A baffling slow leak of air aboard the International Space Station is still defying detection, forcing its two astronauts to take extra measures to find its source, NASA said yesterday. Although the crew is not in any danger, engineers in Houston and Moscow agreed to start closing hatches, in effect separating the Russian and U.S. sections of the orbital complex. The astronauts' scientific work - curtailed after the shuttle disaster last year forced a reduction in the crew, to two members from three - will come to a complete halt.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 27, 2003
MOSCOW - The glitch that caused a Soyuz space capsule to come to earth more than 300 miles from its intended landing point early this month has still not been identified, Russian officials said yesterday. The head of a panel that investigated the off-course landing said at a news conference that although the exact flaw was not known, its chances of recurring were small and that future Soyuz passengers were at no extra risk. The Soyuz has been the only manned link with the International Space Station since the disintegration of the space shuttle Columbia in February.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 7, 2003
MOSCOW - Offering a multinational display of bravura, the three-man crew of the Soyuz space capsule met with the news media yesterday and shrugged off the notion that their steep plunge to Earth in a malfunctioning spaceship Sunday was riskier than any other weekend drive. The two U.S. astronauts and one Russian cosmonaut, clad in identical blue coveralls, spent 40 minutes talking about the sweet smell of Kazakstan earth after 5 1/2 months in space, the strangeness of slithering out of their capsule with muscles that had forgotten gravity and the joy of seeing their wives.
NEWS
October 20, 2002
Nikolai Rukavishnikov, 70, a cosmonaut who in three trips into outer space for the former Soviet Union encountered major problems twice, died yesterday in Moscow of an apparent heart attack, Russian news media reported. Mr. Rukavishnikov's first space voyage was in 1971 aboard the Soyuz 10, which was to have delivered the first humans to the orbiting Salyut-1 space station. The craft docked with the station, but the crew was unable to gain access, reportedly because of a faulty hatch, and the mission was aborted.
NEWS
By ORLANDO SENTINEL | June 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - The Bush administration, forced to weigh its space program against efforts to keep Iran's nuclear ambitions in check, is asking Congress for special permission to buy services it will need for the International Space Station. Without congressional action, U.S. astronauts would have to vacate the space station next spring except for short visits: the law forbids the purchase of transportation services from Russia because of its cooperation in Iran's quest for nuclear power, said NASA Administrator Michael D. Griffin.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2003
MOSCOW - As a U.S.-Russian crew returned to Moscow yesterday after a rough and off-target Soyuz spaceship landing, officials said a commission will investigate what went wrong with the craft's descent from the International Space Station. The spacecraft landed safely in Kazakstan early yesterday using a backup procedure that involved a steeper fall to Earth and placed greater gravitational stress on the occupants. It landed north of the Aral Sea, about 290 miles short of the intended site.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.