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Soybean Rust

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By Ted Shelsby | November 5, 2006
Asian soybean rust, a contagious fungal disease that has devastated soybean crops in other parts of the world, has come dangerously close to making its way to Maryland for the first time. The fungus, which can reduce a soybean field's yield by as much as 80 percent if left untreated, was recently spotted as far north as Virginia, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. While an infestation can have a serious economic impact on farming, it poses no threat to humans. The USDA has been tracking the spread of the plant-killing disease since it was discovered in Japan in 1902.
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NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 9, 2008
Asian soybean rust, a contagious fungal disease that has devastated soybean crops in some Southern states and other parts of the world, has made its way to Maryland. According to agriculture officials, the fungus, which can reduce a soybean field's yield by as much as 80 percent if left untreated, has been discovered in a sentinel plot in Worcester County, just across the state line from Selbyville, Del. It is the first discovery of the crop disease in Maryland or Delaware. In 2006, soybean rust was detected in Virginia.
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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2005
IF THERE is anything Maryland grain farmers fear more than an invasion of the dreaded Asian soybean rust, it's not being paid by their insurance company for crop losses because of the disease. Soybean rust is a highly contagious fungal disease that has been steadily creeping toward Maryland since it was discovered in Louisiana a little more than a year ago. And its chances of making its way here this summer are much greater than agriculture officials had expected as recently as a month ago. In other parts of the world, including southern Africa and South America, soybean rust has reduced yields by as much as 80 percent when left untreated.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | September 9, 2007
From a farmer's perspective, not much good can be said about a drought. But there are silver linings. Winemakers like hot, dry summers, which generate sweeter, more flavorful grapes that make for a better wine that can fetch a higher price. And the 2007 drought has effectively stymied the advance of Asian soybean rust, a plant-killing disease that can devastate a crop. "Up until last week, we had zero risk of soybean rust due to the drought," said Arv Grybauskas, a plant pathologist at the University of Maryland, College Park in a report issued last week updating the spread of the disease.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 9, 2008
Asian soybean rust, a contagious fungal disease that has devastated soybean crops in some Southern states and other parts of the world, has made its way to Maryland. According to agriculture officials, the fungus, which can reduce a soybean field's yield by as much as 80 percent if left untreated, has been discovered in a sentinel plot in Worcester County, just across the state line from Selbyville, Del. It is the first discovery of the crop disease in Maryland or Delaware. In 2006, soybean rust was detected in Virginia.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Maryland farmers are on the lookout for a contagious fungal disease that could devastate future harvests across the state. The disease, called soybean rust, or Asian soybean rust, has been steadily creeping toward Maryland from the Deep South since it was discovered in Louisiana a little more than a year ago. In other parts of the world, including southern Africa and South America, it has reduced soybean yields by as much as 80 percent when left untreated....
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2005
Maryland farmers are preparing for an invasion of the dreaded soybean rust. What sounds like something from a grade-B horror movie actually represents a potentially devastating economic problem for one of the largest segments of the state's agriculture industry - soybeans. Soybean rust, or Asian soybean rust, is a highly contagious fungal disease that has been steadily creeping toward Maryland from the Deep South since it was discovered in Louisiana a little more than a year ago. In other parts of the world, including southern Africa and South America, it has reduced soybean yields by as much as 80 percent when left untreated.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | April 9, 2006
After careful thought, Phil Councell Jr. decided that he would rather risk losing his crop to a plant disease this year than to a subpar growing season. "If I plant corn, I face a financial risk," said the 47-year-old grain farmer, who tends about 1,000 acres outside Cordova in Talbot County. With the cost of fertilizer increasing, Councell said, his corn crop would have to be near perfect for it to be profitable. "There's no margin of error for weather problems," he said. Another option - soybeans - brings a different kind of worry.
NEWS
January 24, 2005
Breakfast forum at Titan Corp. slated Thursday The Anne Arundel Tech Council will present a breakfast forum at 9 a.m. Thursday at the Titan Corp., 2720 Technology Drive, Annapolis Junction. Bob Root, chief executive of Orion Learning International, will be the keynote speaker. Root will discuss NanoWave: Small Tech - Small Worlds - Small Thinkers, described as "an irreverent view of the things to come in nanotechnology, biotech and things we can really use." Sponsors of the event include the Titan Corp.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | November 5, 2006
Asian soybean rust, a contagious fungal disease that has devastated soybean crops in other parts of the world, has come dangerously close to making its way to Maryland for the first time. The fungus, which can reduce a soybean field's yield by as much as 80 percent if left untreated, was recently spotted as far north as Virginia, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. While an infestation can have a serious economic impact on farming, it poses no threat to humans. The USDA has been tracking the spread of the plant-killing disease since it was discovered in Japan in 1902.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | April 9, 2006
After careful thought, Phil Councell Jr. decided that he would rather risk losing his crop to a plant disease this year than to a subpar growing season. "If I plant corn, I face a financial risk," said the 47-year-old grain farmer, who tends about 1,000 acres outside Cordova in Talbot County. With the cost of fertilizer increasing, Councell said, his corn crop would have to be near perfect for it to be profitable. "There's no margin of error for weather problems," he said. Another option - soybeans - brings a different kind of worry.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 20, 2005
Farmers are not known for flaunting their blessings. They grumble about the weather and fuss about low grain prices, even when things are good. But between the first drumstick and the last football game this Thanksgiving, Maryland farmers might want to consider taking a moment to count their blessings. "It has been a bountiful year," Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley said last week as he took a break from making repairs on his John Deere tractor. "There were a few ups and downs with the weather," he said.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | November 20, 2005
Farmers are not known for flaunting their blessings. They grumble about the weather and fuss about low grain prices, even when things are good. But between the first drumstick and the last football game this Thanksgiving, Maryland farmers might want to consider taking a moment to count their blessings. "It has been a bountiful year," Maryland Agriculture Secretary Lewis R. Riley said last week as he took a break from making repairs on his John Deere tractor. "There were a few ups and downs with the weather," he said.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | April 15, 2005
IF THERE is anything Maryland grain farmers fear more than an invasion of the dreaded Asian soybean rust, it's not being paid by their insurance company for crop losses because of the disease. Soybean rust is a highly contagious fungal disease that has been steadily creeping toward Maryland since it was discovered in Louisiana a little more than a year ago. And its chances of making its way here this summer are much greater than agriculture officials had expected as recently as a month ago. In other parts of the world, including southern Africa and South America, soybean rust has reduced yields by as much as 80 percent when left untreated.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2005
Maryland farmers are on the lookout for a contagious fungal disease that could devastate future harvests across the state. The disease, called soybean rust, or Asian soybean rust, has been steadily creeping toward Maryland from the Deep South since it was discovered in Louisiana a little more than a year ago. In other parts of the world, including southern Africa and South America, it has reduced soybean yields by as much as 80 percent when left untreated....
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