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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 1998
I have read that soy protein has estrogenic effects for menopausal women. This leads me to wonder what males are doing to their bodies and libido when eating a high-soy vegetarian diet.Soy contains phytoestrogens, which do seem to provide both estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity. Scientists speculate that a diet rich in soy may partially account for the lower rates of prostate cancer among Japanese men.New research suggests that low-dose estrogen may also have a beneficial impact on cholesterol.
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BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 16, 2004
ST. LOUIS - DuPont Co. thinks St. Louis might hold its next Teflon, Kevlar or Lycra. The chemical giant, headquartered in Wilmington, Del., has built an empire turning scientific successes into household names synonymous with quality. Using advertising and trademark logos, DuPont has convinced a world of consumers that products without its patented knowledge are of less value than products with it. Now, DuPont wants to capitalize on the low-carbohydrate food kick and turn its soy proteins into the value-added ingredient no health-conscious consumer could live without.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1997
Until recently, the very thought of "imitation" burgers would have had all but the brown-rice-and-tofu crowd hacking like a cat with a hairball. Soybeans? Gack! Tempeh? FFfffttt!Well, surprise. ... Many of today's "veggie" burgers are anything but the dreaded sawdust and seaweed -- and an informal Sun taste test proved it. (See results below.)They're full of good things like adzuki beans and shiitake mushrooms, green pepper and mozzarella cheese, wheat berries and rolled oats. Even soy protein has come of age, with better texture and more taste.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D. and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon, Ph.D.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 1998
I have read that soy protein has estrogenic effects for menopausal women. This leads me to wonder what males are doing to their bodies and libido when eating a high-soy vegetarian diet.Soy contains phytoestrogens, which do seem to provide both estrogenic and antiestrogenic activity. Scientists speculate that a diet rich in soy may partially account for the lower rates of prostate cancer among Japanese men.New research suggests that low-dose estrogen may also have a beneficial impact on cholesterol.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 22, 1995
Millions of women are facing a difficult decision. Should they take hormone replacement pills after menopause?On the one hand, they are told that estrogen will reduce their risk of osteoporosis and heart disease. On the other, reports have surfaced linking hormone therapy to breast cancer.Complicating the matter is that there is no consensus. Some studies show a substantially increased incidence of breast cancer (30 to 60 percent) while others demonstrate no elevated risk.Although estrogen has been prescribed for more than 50 years, some experts estimate that it will be at least another decade before we have a definitive answer to this controversy.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | August 15, 1995
Soy is in the news again, this time for lowering total blood cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglycerides. So presumably, adding tofu, tempeh, soy flour or soy milk to your diet could reduce your risks for heart disease, the number one killer of both men and women in the United States.Not long ago we were hearing that the plant estrogens in soy products might also be responsible for the lower rates of breast and prostate cancer in Asian people whose diets are high in soy products.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 16, 2004
ST. LOUIS - DuPont Co. thinks St. Louis might hold its next Teflon, Kevlar or Lycra. The chemical giant, headquartered in Wilmington, Del., has built an empire turning scientific successes into household names synonymous with quality. Using advertising and trademark logos, DuPont has convinced a world of consumers that products without its patented knowledge are of less value than products with it. Now, DuPont wants to capitalize on the low-carbohydrate food kick and turn its soy proteins into the value-added ingredient no health-conscious consumer could live without.
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | November 12, 1997
* Item: Green Giant Harvest Burgers for Recipes* Servings per package: 12 ounces or 6 servings* Cost: $2.99* Preparation time: varies with recipe.* Review: Here's a convenient, fat-free, low-cholesterol alternative to crumbled ground beef for use in sauces and casseroles. This frozen, prebrowned soy protein resembles the genuine article and was priced a bit higher than ground sirloin at my grocer. Its springy texture won't fool sophisticated palates, but it shouldn't offend them either. Flavored with dried onion and garlic, two cups of the Harvest Burger tasted fine in a taco filling and worked even better in spaghetti sauce.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | October 24, 2001
Item: Boca Sausages What you get: 4 sausages Cost: About $3.75 Nutritional content: Smoked - 130 calories, 5 grams fat, 0.5 gram saturated fat, 890 milligrams sodium, 7 grams carbohydrate, 2 grams sugars Preparation time: 2 minutes, 15 seconds to 2 minutes, 30 seconds in microwave; 12 minutes on stove top; 12 minutes on grill Review: Friends who try to avoid eating a lot of meat swear by Boca's burgers. With that in mind, I decided to give the company's new sausages a try. These meatless soy protein sausages would never fool a true sausage lover, even with the smoke flavoring added to the ones we tried.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | November 10, 1999
Preparing pomegranatesBrilliant-red pomegranates are at their peak this month. The juice of the sweet-tart fruit adds zip to marinades, salad dressings, desserts and beverages. The colorful seeds garnish sweet and savory dishes. For preparation tips, write to: Pomegranate Recipes, P.O. Box 293, Fowler, Calif. 93625.Caution on soy productsThe American Institute for Cancer Research is advising consumers against adding large amounts of soy or soy supplements to their diets, saying it is still too early for scientists to make specific dietary recommendations regarding cancer prevention.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | August 20, 1997
Until recently, the very thought of "imitation" burgers would have had all but the brown-rice-and-tofu crowd hacking like a cat with a hairball. Soybeans? Gack! Tempeh? FFfffttt!Well, surprise. ... Many of today's "veggie" burgers are anything but the dreaded sawdust and seaweed -- and an informal Sun taste test proved it. (See results below.)They're full of good things like adzuki beans and shiitake mushrooms, green pepper and mozzarella cheese, wheat berries and rolled oats. Even soy protein has come of age, with better texture and more taste.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 22, 1995
Millions of women are facing a difficult decision. Should they take hormone replacement pills after menopause?On the one hand, they are told that estrogen will reduce their risk of osteoporosis and heart disease. On the other, reports have surfaced linking hormone therapy to breast cancer.Complicating the matter is that there is no consensus. Some studies show a substantially increased incidence of breast cancer (30 to 60 percent) while others demonstrate no elevated risk.Although estrogen has been prescribed for more than 50 years, some experts estimate that it will be at least another decade before we have a definitive answer to this controversy.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,Special to The Sun | August 15, 1995
Soy is in the news again, this time for lowering total blood cholesterol, LDL (bad) cholesterol and triglycerides. So presumably, adding tofu, tempeh, soy flour or soy milk to your diet could reduce your risks for heart disease, the number one killer of both men and women in the United States.Not long ago we were hearing that the plant estrogens in soy products might also be responsible for the lower rates of breast and prostate cancer in Asian people whose diets are high in soy products.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | October 7, 1997
I do not understand why everyone thinks estrogen is so wonderful. My doctor prescribed hormone replacement therapy (HRT) a year ago and it almost ruined my life.At first the symptoms were subtle. My hair started thinning and my libido gradually disappeared. After a few months I developed headaches and problems with my vision. My condition grew worse and I experienced dizziness and numbness in my hands and legs.When I finally stopped the hormones I gradually got better, though my vision is not back to normal yet.Is there any way to get the benefits of estrogen from an herbal medicine?
NEWS
December 2, 2005
A man claimed in your column that he was careful about his diet but still had a cholesterol level of 240. There is one sure thing that will lower his cholesterol without using unnatural, expensive drugs that have side effects. If he eliminates all meat and dairy products, he could get his cholesterol under control and reduce the risk of other diseases like cancer. For many people, a vegetarian diet can indeed lower cholesterol. One study examined a "dietary portfolio" that used soy protein and nuts instead of meat and included foods rich in plant sterols and soluble fiber.
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