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HEALTH
By Charlotte Martin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from dietetic intern Charlotte Martin. Gone are the days when milk came only from cows. Now you can make "milk" out of just about anything, from nuts to rice, even hemp. There are several reasons why one might choose a nondairy alternative over cow's milk, most commonly because of lactose intolerance or veganism. But with so many nondairy "milks" to choose from, it can be overwhelming perusing the milk section of the supermarket.
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HEALTH
By Charlotte Martin, For The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post. The latest post is from dietetic intern Charlotte Martin. Gone are the days when milk came only from cows. Now you can make "milk" out of just about anything, from nuts to rice, even hemp. There are several reasons why one might choose a nondairy alternative over cow's milk, most commonly because of lactose intolerance or veganism. But with so many nondairy "milks" to choose from, it can be overwhelming perusing the milk section of the supermarket.
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HEALTH
By Amy Reed, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Amy Reed, RD, LDN, weighs in on milk. When you are standing in the milk aisle in the grocery store, what are you looking for? Are you lactose intolerant? Do you have a milk allergy? Do you dislike the taste of certain milk products? Are you vegan? How much money do you want to spend on milk?
HEALTH
By Mary Gallagher, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Mary Gallagher, dietetic intern, weighs in nutrition guidelines. The MyPlate icon, seen on http://www.choosemyplate.gov , has replaced the USDA Food Pyramid as the premier guide to more healthful eating. The MyPlate message is designed around the five food groups people should eat every day: fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 21, 1992
Not by cow's milk alone does man live. There also has to be soy milk, cornbread and bacon fat and squaw bread. At least that is what I read in the mail and hear on the phone.Born to drink milkFrom: Georgia Corso, Baltimore.Re: Column standing by cow's milkDear Happy Eater,. . . I was raised attached to my own cow. I have always been exceedingly healthy and drink, as an adult, at least 3 glasses of milk at day. I know, my doctor tells me it is way too much, but we all have have our vices.I also have two kids.
HEALTH
By Mary Gallagher, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Mary Gallagher, dietetic intern, weighs in nutrition guidelines. The MyPlate icon, seen on http://www.choosemyplate.gov , has replaced the USDA Food Pyramid as the premier guide to more healthful eating. The MyPlate message is designed around the five food groups people should eat every day: fruits, vegetables, grains, protein and dairy.
FEATURES
By Lee Ann Cox and Lee Ann Cox,EATING WELL | June 25, 1997
If ever a food needed an image consultant, it's tofu. The stuff is indisputably homely, its flavor is not exactly dynamic and, with two chances at a winning appellation, neither "tofu" nor "bean curd" soars with sex appeal.Factor in its association with the '70s-hippie-vegetarian movement -- a time more of cultural revolution than culinary revelation -- and it's easy to explain the tofu credibility gap.But tofu survived the '70s and has become a mainstream hit in spite of itself. In fact, Americans spend about $1 billion a year on soy products.
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | February 8, 2006
Can you substitute soy milk for regular milk in recipes? Originally seen as a fringe hippie drink, soy milk has sales that have more than quadrupled in the past decade. In 1997, total sales were $156 million; in 2003, $652 million, according to the Soyfoods Association of America. Nancy Chapman, SAA's executive director, said sales have been driven at least partly by consumers' growing awareness of soy milk's health benefits. "It provides a high-quality protein without the saturated fat and cholesterol of cow's milk," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 1998
Looking for a bowling ball? Blue jeans? Brussels sprouts?What if your tastes are more refined. Maybe you're looking for a little something to class up the old homestead. Yeah, you're looking for knick-knacks, antiques, valuable art, paintings of dogs shooting pool and maybe even some of that macaroni jewelry.Where do you go if you just gotta have one of those dolls in the crocheted dresses that cover the spare toilet paper roll?Why, your neighborhood flea market, of course. Flea markets have everything you're looking for and a whole lot of everything you're not looking for.It used to be that flea markets were regulated to the spring and summer, when the weather was nice enough to set up tables outside.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Daniela Troia, of Zia's Cafe and Juice Bar in Towson, offers a vegan recipe for dessert: Chocolate Peanut Butter Tofu Cheesecake. Chocolate Peanut Butter Tofu Cheesecake Makes 8-12 servings FILLING: 12 ounces dark chocolate two 12-ounce packages of firm silken tofu 2 tablespoons agave nectar 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 4 tablespoons soy milk 1 1/4 cup organic peanut butter ROLLED OAT PIE CRUST: 2 cups rolled oats 1/2 cup soy margarine ...
HEALTH
By Amy Reed, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Amy Reed, RD, LDN, weighs in on milk. When you are standing in the milk aisle in the grocery store, what are you looking for? Are you lactose intolerant? Do you have a milk allergy? Do you dislike the taste of certain milk products? Are you vegan? How much money do you want to spend on milk?
NEWS
By ERICA MARCUS and ERICA MARCUS,NEWSDAY | February 8, 2006
Can you substitute soy milk for regular milk in recipes? Originally seen as a fringe hippie drink, soy milk has sales that have more than quadrupled in the past decade. In 1997, total sales were $156 million; in 2003, $652 million, according to the Soyfoods Association of America. Nancy Chapman, SAA's executive director, said sales have been driven at least partly by consumers' growing awareness of soy milk's health benefits. "It provides a high-quality protein without the saturated fat and cholesterol of cow's milk," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 19, 1998
Looking for a bowling ball? Blue jeans? Brussels sprouts?What if your tastes are more refined. Maybe you're looking for a little something to class up the old homestead. Yeah, you're looking for knick-knacks, antiques, valuable art, paintings of dogs shooting pool and maybe even some of that macaroni jewelry.Where do you go if you just gotta have one of those dolls in the crocheted dresses that cover the spare toilet paper roll?Why, your neighborhood flea market, of course. Flea markets have everything you're looking for and a whole lot of everything you're not looking for.It used to be that flea markets were regulated to the spring and summer, when the weather was nice enough to set up tables outside.
FEATURES
By Lee Ann Cox and Lee Ann Cox,EATING WELL | June 25, 1997
If ever a food needed an image consultant, it's tofu. The stuff is indisputably homely, its flavor is not exactly dynamic and, with two chances at a winning appellation, neither "tofu" nor "bean curd" soars with sex appeal.Factor in its association with the '70s-hippie-vegetarian movement -- a time more of cultural revolution than culinary revelation -- and it's easy to explain the tofu credibility gap.But tofu survived the '70s and has become a mainstream hit in spite of itself. In fact, Americans spend about $1 billion a year on soy products.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 21, 1992
Not by cow's milk alone does man live. There also has to be soy milk, cornbread and bacon fat and squaw bread. At least that is what I read in the mail and hear on the phone.Born to drink milkFrom: Georgia Corso, Baltimore.Re: Column standing by cow's milkDear Happy Eater,. . . I was raised attached to my own cow. I have always been exceedingly healthy and drink, as an adult, at least 3 glasses of milk at day. I know, my doctor tells me it is way too much, but we all have have our vices.I also have two kids.
NEWS
By Shawn Hubler and By Shawn Hubler,Special to the Sun | January 12, 2003
All trends start somewhere, and for the sake of argument, you could call Santa Cruz, Calif., the cradle of the soy latte. Colleen Crosby recalls making her first one in 1978, not long after she and her husband opened a coffeehouse there. A friend who was into two of Northern California's signature passions -- veganism and gourmet coffee -- had wondered if the Italian drink of steamed milk and espresso could be done with no animal products. Crosby remembers shoving a pitcher of soy milk under her espresso machine steamer and thinking, "Hmm," when it came out. "It looked like silly putty," she says, laughing.
FEATURES
August 8, 2001
Cooking in college College years are ripe for making memories, but good eating isn't usually one of them. Three recent Williams College grads hope to change that with The Healthy College Cookbook: Quick. Cheap. Easy. (Storey Books, $14.95). They begin with advice on setting up a kitchen, definitions of cooking terms and a review of herbs and spices before launching into recipes for all times of the day. Nutritional information is included. The authors also devised a system to flag their personal favorites, as well as vegetarian and quick recipes.
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