Advertisement
HomeCollectionsSoweto
IN THE NEWS

Soweto

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 17, 1994
SOWETO, South Africa -- "The National Party? No, they do not have an office in Soweto. Their office is in Pretoria," Philemon Madi said of the longtime ruling party of South Africa.But all Mr. Madi had to do was step back and look up at the four-story office building above him.There was the National Party office, with a sign proclaiming its presence in bright blue and green colors.The surprise was evident on his face. "What are they doing there? They should not be here," he said.For Mr. Madi, 33, it was the same sort of awakening to the new South Africa that many whites have been getting for the last four years with banned and banished figures showing up on television and in the newspapers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
This uplifting video came to my attention today and I just had to share it. Even if you're sick of choral flashmob events in stores, you're bound to find this one irresistible.  Seems that the famed Soweto Gospel Choir was planning a flashmob at a Woolworths in Pretoria to promote the charity Operation Smile Christmas. News of Nelson Mandela's death arrived shortly before the project began, so the ensemble changed the music, replacing a James Brown song with an anthem from the 1980s by Johnny Clegg, "Asimbonanga," a plea for Mandela's release from jail.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 27, 2005
SOWETO, South Africa - In the last years of apartheid, if you were black, had money and lived in Soweto, odds were good you had a house in Diepkloof Extension, or wanted one. The hilltop neighborhood of 1,300 single-family homes was the most desired address in Soweto, an otherwise desperately poor township where the country's white rulers corralled some 1.5 million black South Africans. Once freedom arrived in 1994, many neighborhood residents fled to formerly white suburbs, jumping at the chance to leave behind the teeming township.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2013
Baltimore Rep. Elijah Cummings will be among 26 congressmen traveling to South Africa to attend memorial services for revered leader Nelson Mandela Tuesday in FNB Stadium, known as Soccer City in Soweto. It was at that stadium in July 2010 that Mandela made his last public appearance at the World Cup final. Mandela, who died Thursday evening at the age of 95, will be buried Dec. 15 in his hometown of Qunu, following a traditional 10 days of mourning. It was there that the first black president of the divided country spent his childhood years.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | March 18, 1994
SOWETO, South Africa -- State President Frederick W. de Klerk's two impromptu walkabouts during his campaign stop in this sprawling black township were moments out of the picture-book of the new South Africa.Scores of excited residents crowded about, smiling as they strained for a glimpse of the white leader of the party that imposed apartheid and then dismantled it.Whether or not they would vote for his National Party next month was beside the point: Their president had come to call, and they were glad.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | September 30, 2007
Soweto, South Africa -- You know it's not a typical shopping center ribbon-cutting when the man wielding the scissors is Nelson Mandela. "With this action, we declare the mall open," the 89-year-old anti-apartheid hero and ex-president said to cheers Thursday after snipping the gold ribbon at Maponya Mall. The 180-store complex is the first megamall in Soweto, the vast township near Johannesburg that's home to well over a million black South Africans. These aren't just any stores. They include some of the same upscale retailers found at the fanciest malls as well as the township's first multiplex cinema.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | August 1, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- Diepkloof is a neighborhood that looks like many in the suburbs of Johannesburg -- new, stylish houses surrounded by security walls, with snappy BMW and Mercedes automobiles in the driveways.But Diepkloof is different. All the houses are occupied by blacks. And the community is in Soweto, belying the image of this black township, a sprawling suburb that is home to perhaps 3 million people, as a place of little more than poverty, despair and disruption.In fact, although most houses in Soweto are basic four-room buildings, surrounded by barren dirt and scattered trash, many have been expanded and improved by their owners.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Johannesburg Bureau | June 11, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- Almost a decade ago, the African National Congress called for townships like this one to become "ungovernable" as part of the fight against apartheid.Now that it is on the verge of taking power in the country's first one-man, one-vote elections, which should take place early next year, the question is whether the ANC can make them governable again.The ANC's control over the townships was called into question again recently when black students called for a boycott of classes over examination fees and then black teachers threatened a strike over salaries.
NEWS
By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau | February 12, 1993
SOWETO, South Africa -- The windows of Soweto's Tladi High School were smashed in 1988, and today they are jagged reminders of a season of riots from which the school has never recovered.The revolution that spawned Soweto's violence is moving into another phase, closer to achieving its goals. But Soweto is still wretchedly behind, still caught in its own violence and an abiding compulsion to protest against authority.The students, poor black youngsters raised in the turmoil of township life, still run a gantlet of thugs and rapists to reach their torn-up classrooms every day.Last year, only six Tladi students passed the graduation exam, a dismal showing even among black South African schools, where fewer than half of all seniors graduated, compared to 97 percent of whites.
TRAVEL
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
ROSE MALINGE REMEMBERS emerging from her Soweto home in the late 1990s and watching scores of slow-moving tourist vans -- each loaded with curious foreigners who pressed their cameras against the windows. They smiled. They waved. They clicked. But they didn't dare ask the drivers to stop. "They would take all these photos, but they wouldn't talk to us," said Malinge, who knew why the visitors had chosen her area of the sprawling, black South African settlement for the snail's pace tour: It was Orlando West township, one of the most popular in Soweto (an acronym for South-Western Townships)
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,[Sun foreign reporter] | December 25, 2007
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa --At first glance, Isabella Mosime's story could not possibly say all that much about the future of South Africa. After all, she is a black teenager who was raised by a white family, an anomaly in this race-obsessed country. Look more closely, though, and Bella exemplifies something potentially significant. Because she has a foot in both the black and white worlds, this loud and bubbly 19-year-old can move nimbly back and forth, smudging those lines in the process.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,Sun foreign reporter | September 30, 2007
Soweto, South Africa -- You know it's not a typical shopping center ribbon-cutting when the man wielding the scissors is Nelson Mandela. "With this action, we declare the mall open," the 89-year-old anti-apartheid hero and ex-president said to cheers Thursday after snipping the gold ribbon at Maponya Mall. The 180-store complex is the first megamall in Soweto, the vast township near Johannesburg that's home to well over a million black South Africans. These aren't just any stores. They include some of the same upscale retailers found at the fanciest malls as well as the township's first multiplex cinema.
NEWS
By Article and photos by Scott Calvert and Article and photos by Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | April 8, 2007
SOWETO, South Africa-- --The petite girl named Fezeka slides in at the end of the third row and strains to see over the shoulders of her high school classmates. She hears the voice - blaring through a bullhorn - of Busisiwe Ledwaba, the ebullient geography teacher, who is predicting great success on the momentous exams that begin this morning. Ever the brooder, Fezeka isn't sure she believes the upbeat words. Monde has a clear view, right up front in the October sunshine. At 23, he is older than almost all his classmates, well aware of exactly how long he has waited to hear this speech.
FEATURES
February 20, 2007
Concert Soweto choir performs The sounds of South Africa come to the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, 1212 Cathedral St., tonight at 7:30 when the Sowe to Gospel Choir sings its own style of traditional and contem porary spirited music. Tickets are $25-$62. Information: go to baltimoresymphony.org or call 410-783-8000.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
A South African brand of gospel is coming to Baltimore next month, when the Soweto Gospel Choir performs at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. "Our sound is South African traditional gospel," says director David Mulovhedzi. "That's the gospel that was started by our forefathers in the olden days. That's the gospel we really work on. "When we are on stage we use the African drums, you know, the djembe," he says. "There's a lot of body movement on stage because when we praise God according to the traditional `African God Song,' you sing and dance and ululate.
TRAVEL
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 2, 2005
ROSE MALINGE REMEMBERS emerging from her Soweto home in the late 1990s and watching scores of slow-moving tourist vans -- each loaded with curious foreigners who pressed their cameras against the windows. They smiled. They waved. They clicked. But they didn't dare ask the drivers to stop. "They would take all these photos, but they wouldn't talk to us," said Malinge, who knew why the visitors had chosen her area of the sprawling, black South African settlement for the snail's pace tour: It was Orlando West township, one of the most popular in Soweto (an acronym for South-Western Townships)
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 20, 1996
SOWETO, South Africa -- Twenty years ago this week, the children of Soweto taught their parents the dangerous game that eventually led to their freedom.It was the dangerous, serious game of protest.What was being protested then was a rule that schools teach their students in Afrikaans, the language of the whites who invented apartheid. But the protests could have been about many things. Blacks needed passes to be anywhere other than their penned-in areas. Almost every white expected deferential respect.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 7, 2002
SOWETO, South Africa - They buried Jabulani Nene on a Tuesday. That it was Tuesday was no small matter because nearly all funerals in Soweto are held on Saturdays - the day for the dead. Saturday would have been Nene's day, too. But the funeral directors were booked solid. There were too many dead. Too many graves to dig. Too many hearses rented out. Sorry, the funeral directors told Nene's family. Sometimes the dead must wait. So Nene was buried on the next Tuesday. And that was about all that was unusual about his funeral.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 27, 2005
SOWETO, South Africa - In the last years of apartheid, if you were black, had money and lived in Soweto, odds were good you had a house in Diepkloof Extension, or wanted one. The hilltop neighborhood of 1,300 single-family homes was the most desired address in Soweto, an otherwise desperately poor township where the country's white rulers corralled some 1.5 million black South Africans. Once freedom arrived in 1994, many neighborhood residents fled to formerly white suburbs, jumping at the chance to leave behind the teeming township.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 2002
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - South Africa's defense minister said yesterday that the government had begun searching for white extremists within the military and the police force who may be trying to ignite "a race war" within the country, state radio reported. Defense Minister Mosiuoa Lekota said he believed that a small number of disaffected white soldiers and police officers remained opposed to democracy. He said there was no evidence yet to link security officers directly to Wednesday's bombings in Soweto, which killed one person and wounded another.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.