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NEWS
December 10, 2009
On December 2, 2009, CAROLE JEAN BERTSCH, surrounded by family and dear friends, Carole Jean Bertsch went to be with the Lord. Carole Jean died at the age of 56 at Stella Maris Hospice after a valiant struggle with cancer. She is survived by her parents, Ludwig and Ginny Scherer, her loving son, Zeb Bertsch and his wife Candy of Aberdeen, also her brother John Scherer, his wife Teri and their son Joseph of Bel Air. Carole is also survived by many aunts, uncles and cousins in the United States and abroad.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Ron Spencer, an artist who twice restored the painted designs on a Linthicum church's ceiling and walls, died Wednesday of bone cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 67. Mr. Spencer, who lived in Baltimore, graduated from Baltimore City College in 1965 and from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1971. He was active in the civil rights movement and in Vietnam War protests, said a longtime friend, John Oden of Baltimore. But most of Mr. Spencer's life centered on art. Prolific and detail-oriented, his work ranged from murals to ink-and-colored-pencil drawings to posters for Baltimore's Sowebo art and music festival.
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NEWS
January 22, 2014
In response to the Jan 13th article, "Key councilman says city shouldn't zone long time liquor stores out of business" (Jan. 13) I would like to say that I strongly agree with Councilman Ed Reisinger. I am a long-time resident (over 30 years) of Charles Village, and the liquor store in question in my community has been an excellent neighbor. It has been owned and operated by the same family for 25 years and has never been the site or focus of any crime. This neighborhood has strong community organizations and much homeowner involvement, as do many of the neighborhoods in the zoning board's cross hairs.
NEWS
January 22, 2014
In response to the Jan 13th article, "Key councilman says city shouldn't zone long time liquor stores out of business" (Jan. 13) I would like to say that I strongly agree with Councilman Ed Reisinger. I am a long-time resident (over 30 years) of Charles Village, and the liquor store in question in my community has been an excellent neighbor. It has been owned and operated by the same family for 25 years and has never been the site or focus of any crime. This neighborhood has strong community organizations and much homeowner involvement, as do many of the neighborhoods in the zoning board's cross hairs.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Ron Spencer, an artist who twice restored the painted designs on a Linthicum church's ceiling and walls, died Wednesday of bone cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. He was 67. Mr. Spencer, who lived in Baltimore, graduated from Baltimore City College in 1965 and from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 1971. He was active in the civil rights movement and in Vietnam War protests, said a longtime friend, John Oden of Baltimore. But most of Mr. Spencer's life centered on art. Prolific and detail-oriented, his work ranged from murals to ink-and-colored-pencil drawings to posters for Baltimore's Sowebo art and music festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2006
Every year, musicians and artists ignite a day-long cultural explosion on a couple blocks of Hollins Street. The Sowebo Arts Festival, which turns 21 Sunday, showcases the city's art scene with more than eight hours of live music, exhibits, painting and vendors. But this year, it's also celebrating the new home of Sowebo Arts, the group that organizes the free festival. They recently moved into a permanent spot at 1111 Hollins St., a former public bathhouse. The front of the space will be a gallery (closed in August)
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,SUN FASHION EDITOR | May 23, 1996
You can be a Bohemian for a day on Sunday at the 11th annual SoWeBohemian Festival -- southwest Baltimore's way of telling the town what the neighborhood is all about. The area around Hollins Market attracts residents who are highly creative if not high-tax bracket.Artist and designer Kim Brown will have a booth where she will be selling her own jewelry, screen-printed clothes and found-fashion items. She says she makes only what she likes, so her efforts never go to waste and are just as likely to wind up in her closet.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
Betsey Waters is a Sowebohemian through and through. "I love this neighborhood," Waters said, organizing some of the potted plants she was selling at its 21st annual Sowebohemian Arts and Music Festival. "I love the diversity and its quirkiness." A 28-year resident of the Sowebo neighborhood - its name coined from Southwest Baltimore - Waters said she has lived there through the boom of the Hollins Market area, seen economic hardships devastate the neighborhood and enjoyed seeing the current renovation of abandoned buildings.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | May 26, 2008
Freedom David Colbert is prepared to die young, but not because he thinks he'll become a crime statistic in Baltimore. He says he's prepared to accept such a fate because it's the same one that has befallen so many young artists. A decade ago, he left the Baltimore School for the Arts, disillusioned with what he felt were the strictures of techniques being taught. Now that the 29-year-old is painting again, at a prolific pace, he says he understands the artistic destiny. "I would give my life for my art. That's what it means to me. It's my lifeline," said Colbert, who would only describe the style of his portraiture, landscapes and abstract work in oils and acrylics as "mine."
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
He was shielded from the afternoon sun by the awning that covered his booth, but the bright mood emanating from Larry Stevens was hard to miss. An artist who grew up in Baltimore, Stevens was so busy selling prints of his colorful cityscapes he barely had time to talk Sunday — until it came time to discuss the bustling SoWeBo Arts and Music Festival that was unfolding all around him, the 26th in a row to be held in the Hollins Market neighborhood on...
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2011
He was shielded from the afternoon sun by the awning that covered his booth, but the bright mood emanating from Larry Stevens was hard to miss. An artist who grew up in Baltimore, Stevens was so busy selling prints of his colorful cityscapes he barely had time to talk Sunday — until it came time to discuss the bustling SoWeBo Arts and Music Festival that was unfolding all around him, the 26th in a row to be held in the Hollins Market neighborhood on...
NEWS
December 10, 2009
On December 2, 2009, CAROLE JEAN BERTSCH, surrounded by family and dear friends, Carole Jean Bertsch went to be with the Lord. Carole Jean died at the age of 56 at Stella Maris Hospice after a valiant struggle with cancer. She is survived by her parents, Ludwig and Ginny Scherer, her loving son, Zeb Bertsch and his wife Candy of Aberdeen, also her brother John Scherer, his wife Teri and their son Joseph of Bel Air. Carole is also survived by many aunts, uncles and cousins in the United States and abroad.
NEWS
By John-John Williams and John-John Williams,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
When Micha Dannenberg looks out the window of his Southwest Baltimore home, he's noticing some definite changes. There are fewer vacant houses, he said. Parking has become more of a chore. And new business owners in the neighborhood are starting to move in. "There is a real new community involvement that corresponds to the redevelopment of the Hollins Market," he said. The changes seemed apparent Sunday when thousands of people flocked into Dannenberg's neighborhood for the annual Sowebohemian Arts and Music Festival.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | May 26, 2008
Freedom David Colbert is prepared to die young, but not because he thinks he'll become a crime statistic in Baltimore. He says he's prepared to accept such a fate because it's the same one that has befallen so many young artists. A decade ago, he left the Baltimore School for the Arts, disillusioned with what he felt were the strictures of techniques being taught. Now that the 29-year-old is painting again, at a prolific pace, he says he understands the artistic destiny. "I would give my life for my art. That's what it means to me. It's my lifeline," said Colbert, who would only describe the style of his portraiture, landscapes and abstract work in oils and acrylics as "mine."
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | May 28, 2007
The heavy aroma of incense, funnel cake and fresh paint permeated the streets of Southwest Baltimore yesterday for the 22nd annual Sowebohemian Arts and Music Festival. But it was mostly art that was the order of the day with an eclectic array of creators - such as a whimsical Baltimore hon with a beehive hairdo who was selling painted light switch plates. A local artist showed a collage made of old tennis shoes, and jewelers who twisted wires displayed their latest designs on the pavement.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | May 29, 2006
Betsey Waters is a Sowebohemian through and through. "I love this neighborhood," Waters said, organizing some of the potted plants she was selling at its 21st annual Sowebohemian Arts and Music Festival. "I love the diversity and its quirkiness." A 28-year resident of the Sowebo neighborhood - its name coined from Southwest Baltimore - Waters said she has lived there through the boom of the Hollins Market area, seen economic hardships devastate the neighborhood and enjoyed seeing the current renovation of abandoned buildings.
NEWS
By John-John Williams and John-John Williams,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
When Micha Dannenberg looks out the window of his Southwest Baltimore home, he's noticing some definite changes. There are fewer vacant houses, he said. Parking has become more of a chore. And new business owners in the neighborhood are starting to move in. "There is a real new community involvement that corresponds to the redevelopment of the Hollins Market," he said. The changes seemed apparent Sunday when thousands of people flocked into Dannenberg's neighborhood for the annual Sowebohemian Arts and Music Festival.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 3, 2004
Baltimore police officials have launched an internal investigation after reports of police brutality last weekend at the conclusion of the annual SoWeBo Festival. Witnesses who attended Sunday's music and arts celebration said they saw police officers use a stun gun on a man and throw a pregnant woman to the ground, an action that they said caused her to hemorrhage. They also said police dragged a middle-aged woman by her hair. "I've never experienced anything like this before," said Cindy Ringgold, 33, of Laurel, who filed a complaint with the Police Department on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | May 25, 2006
Every year, musicians and artists ignite a day-long cultural explosion on a couple blocks of Hollins Street. The Sowebo Arts Festival, which turns 21 Sunday, showcases the city's art scene with more than eight hours of live music, exhibits, painting and vendors. But this year, it's also celebrating the new home of Sowebo Arts, the group that organizes the free festival. They recently moved into a permanent spot at 1111 Hollins St., a former public bathhouse. The front of the space will be a gallery (closed in August)
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2004
About 50 people, including witnesses and self-described victims of alleged police brutality at the annual Sowebo Arts Festival, met last night to share stories and discuss possible legal action against the Baltimore Police Department. But more than anything, they said, they hoped for a culture change within the department, which they said seems to be growing more violent and insensitive. "I hope the police get the message that just because someone looks different, they shouldn't be treated this way," said Frantz Walker, 37, a Baltimore resident who told of his brother being allegedly knocked down and arrested after he told police officers to "chill out."
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