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By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The United States and the Soviet Union wil go into a third day of talks today in a strenuous effort to finish nine years of negotiations and conclude an agreement cutting ++ long-range nuclear weapons in time for Presidents Bush and Mikhail S. Gorbachev to schedule a summit for the end of this month.In an abrupt change of plans, Secretary of State James A. Baker III and his counterpart, Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, did not go into a previously scheduled session late last night, instead deciding to resume this morning, the State Department said.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
As Russia's actions in Ukraine rattle its neighbors, the Maryland National Guard is affirming its decades-long partnership with Estonia. Maryland has helped to train Estonian troops since shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Now it's preparing to send A-10 pilots and liaison officers to Saber Strike, an annual U.S.-led security exercise that focuses on Estonia and its Baltic neighbors Latvia and Lithuania. The commander of the Maryland Guard traveled to Estonia last week for meetings with Northern European defense ministers and U.S. military leaders.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 20, 1991
WASHINGTON -- His prescience may not help him be confirmed as CIA director, but yesterday's coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev does confirm Robert M. Gates' reputation: the Bush administration's in-house pessimist was right.So was Alexander Yakovlev, once Mr. Gorbachev's top aide, who quitthe Soviet Communist Party on Friday, warning that a hard-line coup was in the works.But for the legions of American Sovietologists, the record is mixed.The effort to sort out who was right and who was wrong is a classic Washington response to an international crisis, as experts scramble to demonstrate that world events prove the soundness of whatever policy position they have been advocating.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | October 19, 1991
JERUSALEM -- The United States and the Soviet Union went ahead yesterday with formal invitations to Arab states, Israel and Palestinians to a Mideast peace conference despite an unexpected delay by Israel in deciding whether to attend.The peace conference was set for Oct. 30 in Madrid.At the same time yesterday, the Soviet Union and Israel announced the resumption of full diplomatic relations after a lapse of 24 years, a gesture that Israel had insisted upon before it would agree to attend talks co-sponsored by the Soviets.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | March 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's aid package for the former Soviet Union may come too late to counter the widespread impression that his administration is following, rather than leading, the drive to cement free-market democracy there.The plan, to be unveiled tomorrow, comes only after prodding from former President Richard M. Nixon, who in a widely publicized memo derided aid efforts so far as "pathetically inadequate." The cause also has been pressed forcefully by such key senators as Sam Nunn, a Georgia Democrat, and Richard G. Lugar, an Indiana Republican, and even by Mr. Bush's ambassador to Moscow, Robert S. Strauss.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | August 21, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Losing in the Virginia Slims of Washington women's tennis tournament was simply the last straw for Natalia Zvereva."Things have not gone my way in the last few days," she said. "And then, the trouble at home . . ."The 20-year-old from Minsk, U.S.S.R., stopped to wipe away tears.Her country is in the midst of what could turn into a civil war, as the Soviet Union responds to the coup that ousted President Mikhail Gorbachev two days ago.Yesterday afternoon, Zvereva, the 16th-ranked player in the world, lost 6-4, 7-5 to Radka Zrubakova, a woman she had beaten easily in three previous meetings.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | September 3, 1991
Michail Kourepine might be expected to stand out as he lumbers down Elegant Water Street here, lugging an impossibly large bag stuffed with recent purchases, wearing tight blue jeans, no shirt and a belt marked repeatedly with the name of a famous French brand of sportswear.The towering, 28-year-old from Leningrad, U.S.S.R., might stick out, that is, were it not for the scores of other outsized Soviet and Eastern European tourists, traders and black marketers bullying through this free market's tight confines with distinctly non-Chinese brusqueness.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 18, 1991
MOSCOW -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin have agreed to bury the U.S.S.R. on New Year's Eve.Mr. Gorbachev, finally yielding in his battle to preserve the crumbling Soviet Union, declared yesterday that he would accept the new Commonwealth of Independent States as its constitutional successor and said he was now working for an orderly transition.Mr. Gorbachev later agreed with Mr. Yeltsin on dissolution of the central government's remaining ministries over the next two weeks so that the new commonwealth, which will probably include 10 of the remaining 12 Soviet republics, can come into formal existence Jan. 1."
NEWS
By Antero Pietila | June 13, 1993
LENIN'S TOMB: THE LAST DAYS OF THE SOVIET EMPIRE.David Remnick.Random House.576 pages. $24.50. During the botched-up 1991 coup attempt against Mikhail S. Gorbachev, men from the Soviet military prosecutor's office were digging up the bones of Stalin's victims near Moscow. Should they go on or stop?The prosecutors had interviewed a local man who described how, in April 1940, his secret police unit had shot Polish officers in the woods -- 250 a night, for a month.Like many another cog in Stalin's death machine, the aging secret police veteran had chosen to build his retirement home in those killing fields.
NEWS
By MARK MATTHEWS | September 8, 1991
Washington.-- Over the long term, the United States desires the death of the Soviet empire, its strategic obsession for nearly five decades.But in the short term, the United States is helping to keep the patient on life support.With its solicitude for Mikhail Gorbachev, its wish to see the Soviet nuclear arsenal under central control and its stress on orderly transformation, the Bush administration is almost unabashedly working to restrain the potentially disruptive forces that could remove the Soviet threat permanently.
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